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Why has the Fire Emblem franchise been less popular than other Nintendo titles?

While 1.8 million in unit sales is a success for the Fire Emblem series, it pales next to other Nintendo titles.

Since the initial 2012 release of Fire Emblem: Awakening, I have heard much more about the franchise from friends and family than I ever had previously. As of December 2014, the game had moved about 1.8 million units, a great success for a series that typically has sold under 1 million units per game.

But how does that compare to best sellers in Nintendo’s other video game franchises?

Nintendo’s best selling Mario game, Super Mario Bros., shipped 40.24 million units. The Legend of Zelda series’ most popular game, Ocarina of Time (N64), sold 7.6 million. Super Smash Bros. Brawl sold 12.14 million, and Pokémon Blue, Green, and Red sold a combined total of 31.38 million.

Nintendo game sales bar graph

* Game sales include bundled products and downloads from the e-shop. NES, GBC, and N64 data was last recorded December 2006. All other data was recorded December 2013, and December 2014. Data retrieved from Nintendo Everything.

The sales of Fire Emblem: Awakening pale in comparison to some of the others. Granted, since the other FE games never broke 1 million units Fire Emblem: Awakening was never expected to do this well, and was very possibly slated to be the last game in the series.

What might have made the difference, then?  

1. Games before Fire Emblem: Awakening have been brutally difficult (Radiant Dawn, I am looking at you)

FE: Awakening introduced a game mode called “casual mode” which allows characters that lose all their HP in battle to simply retreat rather than die. In previous games, this option was not available. Once a character was dead, he was gone forever (with the exception of the single use of the Aum staff in Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon).

If you are like me and tend to want to rush through turn-based strategy games, and (as a result) end up getting everyone killed off, there are many, many frustrated resets before you get anywhere. While there’s still a difficulty or two capable of causing me to want to throw the game across the room, difficulty settings are much more customizable now than they were before.

2. The relationship system was not large, nor fleshed out, until Fire Emblem: Awakening

The relationship system is probably many peoples’ favorite part of the game. In previous games, like Sacred Stones and Blazing Sword, there was a system in place, involving elemental “affinities” that helped calculate bonus stats given by supports and matching the affinity of the map.

Characters could marry, but often only after the game's end credits, and unlike in Fire Emblem: Awakening, children did not spontaneously arise due to time travel. Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon, due to its nature as a remake of the original Fire Emblem, does not have the supports and affinities that people seem to enjoy so much. Instead, little conversations and cutscenes that can be triggered by, for example, having a certain number of character units alive (the Gaiden chapters) or having two units on a specific battlefield speak to one another.  Fire Emblem: Awakening has a support system but no affinity system, which arguably made relationships a little less complicated.

Add in Awakening's pairing system and getting those interactions became significantly simpler. In previous titles, units had to be next to one another rather than on the same tile with one unit protecting the other, and that is not always a viable option, especially for squishy spellcasters.

Support conversation

A support conversation between Henry and Tharja.

3. Free and paid DLC

While paid DLC can be seen as a negative, it adds something to the series that had not been present before: the ability to grind for experience and gold. In prior installations, there could be some serious limitations on budget as far as what you could buy for your characters. Sometimes, potentially good characters would never develop into strong units because of a lack of experience points, especially if they showed up late in the game.

The random available battles can be used for grinding, and Sacred Stones introduced random encounters as well as a tower in which to grind out levels and support conversations; neither options were nearly as efficient in providing gold or experience as DLC.

4. More advertisement

I have never seen an ad for most of the Fire Emblem games published in English, and that is probably because there was not much publicity in the media for them in the first place. I had never heard of them until one of my good friends told me about them.

Fire Emblem Awakening was advertised as a demo in the e-shop by Nintendo, giving players a chance to test-run it first before buying it. There was also an exclusive Fire Emblem: Awakening 3DS with a digital copy of the game bundled with it.

Improvements and advertisement certainly mean a larger player base. But what about the popularity of other Nintendo franchises?

Overall, Fire Emblem: Awakening lends itself to more casual players than previous games in the franchise.  But for all the improvements, other games are still either much better known, or much more appreciated by the Nintendo fanbase.

Bundling and a combination of slightly different games may help explain some of the success of Super Mario Bros. and Pokémon Blue, Green, and Red, but Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Ocarina of Time are standalone games and were not bundled with systems for any significant stretch of time. 

What is it the franchise is lacking that other Nintendo games have?

1. Spontaneity

This just comes with the genre. Fire Emblem: Awakening is a game that requires a lot of planning, especially if you are playing a higher difficulty or are trying to gain support bonuses between a specific set of characters.

Not everyone is a good strategist, and I know sometimes I find frustration when I have to slow down and calculate exactly what I need to do, before I do it. Sometimes one misstep is enough to kill a character off. In some other games, like Zelda or Mario, there is a lot more spontaneity; you figure out things as you go.

Unlike a game that requires stealth, or subtlety, you can usually bumble into things and get away with it (unless you are in the Cave of Origins in Zelda, and stumble into more than two or three darknuts). There is no need to preplan every move, and it is pretty simple to go with the flow.

Fire Emblem Awakening grid

Movement in Fire Emblem is based on a grid system, and every unit has a certain amount of spaces it can move, based on class and terrain.

2. Yet again, advertisement

Despite the e-shop demo that I saw at one point or another, I have never seen an advertisement on television, or in the newspaper, for Fire Emblem: Awakening. However, I have seen such things for recent Mario and Pokémon titles.

Though Robin (the player avatar) and Lucina have made their first appearance in the most recent installation to the Super Smash Bros. series, that may not be enough to interest a gamer already too absorbed in making other characters defy the laws of physics and fly off the screen. Nintendo may have chosen to invest more in the games it makes for “general audiences” rather than the typical strategy-loving audience of Fire Emblem.

3. Introduction to the rest of the world at the same time as Japan

The original Fire Emblem game was released to the public in Japan in 1990. All games, up to Blazing Sword in 2003, were exclusive to Japan and never reached foreign shores, with the exception of the remake of Fire Emblem in the form of Shadow Dragon.

In fact, the first contact with Fire Emblem many had was with Super Smash Bros. Melee, released in 2001, which featured Marth and Roy (if not for the DLC, in Fire Emblem: Awakening a lot of people probably still would not know who Roy is). ‘Who the heck are these people? What is Fire Emblem?’ My young friends and I asked each other. Until 2009, I still had no idea who Marth was.

The fact is, there were 13 years when the Fire Emblem series did not exist in a form usable to most people outside of Japan. The franchise has had far less time than, say, The Legend of Zelda, to be taken in by the rest of the world. Ocarina of Time, considered a landmark game in the Zelda series, practically made Zelda a household name. This came out 5 years before Fire Emblem even debuted in North America.

Popularity can be fickle 

Sometimes a game with potential misses the mark and may drive newcomers away, with, for example, an unfriendly user interface or difficult controls. Fire Emblem has not suffered from user interface or control issues, but rather off-putting difficulty and lack of exposure.

Fire Emblem: Awakening brought some much-needed changes to the series, and given the large increase in sales from what units were moved with previous titles, should still be considered quite the success. Looking into the future, we can only hope that Fire Emblem If meets the same standards set by the previous game, or even tops them.

Published May. 28th 2015
  • KungFro
    Correspondent
    I'm honestly hoping that Fire Emblem IF can help turn the tides. Promising the inclusion of varying difficulties and multiple campaigns is sure to maintain, and maybe even increase, the flow of newcomers. Still, it's also important that veteran players avoid talking down to fresh faces if we want the series to thrive. I've been with the series for as long as I can remember, and even I get turned off by the elitist mentality that some of the other FE players have.

    I support there being easier difficulty options, even though I'll never use them. After all, we all lead the same armies in hopes of victory and refuse to let a character stay dead – even if I do dislike Sumia with a burning passion.
  • SwordandSorcery
    Correspondent
    Admittedly, that is true. The arenas could help out a character quite a bit but you ran the risk of getting them killed if you did not yield in time. I will agree I feel a sense of satisfaction (and relief) every time I make it through a tough battle. What do you think I played Shadow Dragon H5 for? Other than to say I did it. Though, I'm the kind of person who fails so much at strategy that I had to rely on a lucky double critical hit by Marth to kill Medeus. Sometimes I will seek out a challenge like H5 or Lunatic Mode, but most of the time I avoid it specifically because half the time I cannot figure out the brutal first 9-10 chapters alone. You need to put this character on this exact spot and hope the AI makes their characters go in a specific direction that may not always happen? Not generally for me, and probably not for most casual players.
  • Jay Ricciardi
    Contributor
    I hate being that guy, but I really loved the older GBA FE games specifically because they were so much harder and more tactical. Going through a whole game without losing a character was a point of pride and a real accomplishment. I loved theory-crafting what teams and how to optimize them.

    Granted, it was super frustrating. Going into an arena to level characters was excessively risky and each move had to be so calculated. Starting a mission over because the last enemy got a lucky crit was painful. As much as I enjoy that the series is getting more popular, it just doesn't have the same charm for me that it used to have. The series always has had such great characters, so I felt so satisfied to tough it out with them and have them claw to the end of a mission.
  • The Soapbox Lord
    Featured Contributor
    Sacred Stones was great!
    Like you said, you wanted to keep your characters alive at all costs, and the satisfaction when you pulled off a mission with your entire group intact was like no other.
    The GBA titles also had a tactical depth even some newer tactics games can't hope to achieve.

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