Metroid II: Return of Samus Articles RSS Feed | GameSkinny.com Metroid II: Return of Samus RSS Feed on GameSkinny.com https://www.gameskinny.com/ en Launch Media Network 5 Games That Need to Be On the Gameboy Mini https://www.gameskinny.com/u3mur/5-games-that-need-to-be-on-the-gameboy-mini https://www.gameskinny.com/u3mur/5-games-that-need-to-be-on-the-gameboy-mini Mon, 23 Oct 2017 17:40:01 -0400 Allison M Reilly

With the Classic SNES Mini out now and the just revealed SNES-styled New 3DS XL coming shipping on Cyber Monday, rumors are circling about the development of a Gameboy Mini. Recent news about the rumored handheld and a recently registered trademark by Nintendo suggests it is, in fact, in development.

And although I don't know if the Gameboy ought to be any smaller, I do love the idea of a Classic iteration of the handheld featuring the best Gameboy games that were ever made. If a Classic Gameboy Mini ever does see the light of day, these are the five must-have games we want included. 

Tetris

What would a Classic Gameboy Mini be without Tetris? This puzzler was the pack-in title for the original Gameboy and remains one of the most well-known block busters of all time. It's certainly the one and only video game my mother will play.

What makes Tetris spectacular is that the game hasn't needed much updating or re-imagining over the years. Sure, there've been games that try to mimick it, like Puyo Puyo, but nothing comes close to the original's panache. It was awesome in 1984 and it's still awesome in 2017.

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening

Link's Awakening originally started as a prototype for the Gameboy, one meant to demonstrate all that the handheld was capable of. But as all great stories about great video games go, it ended up being fun, too. So it was ultimately released to great fanfare.

That's why Link's Awakening has Yoshi and Chomp Chomps in it and ultimately, doesn't seem to fit in with the rest of the Legend of Zelda franchise. Nonetheless, because of the game's role in the handheld's history, this installment ought to be included in any Classic Gameboy Mini that releases.

Super Mario Land

Much like Link's Awakening, Super Mario Land is also a departure from what we know and love about the Mario universe. It doesn't take place in the Mushroom Kingdom. There's no Bowser, Luigi or Toad. And it introduced us to Princess Daisy (for anyone who wondered how she suddenly appeared in Mario Tennis).

Overall, Super Mario Land was pretty, well, super. And it quickly became a staple for Gameboy owners back in the day. All the more reason why it should be a no brainer for the Gameboy Mini.

Metroid II: Return of Samus

The true sequel to original Metroid and prequel to Super Metroid, Metroid II is the only game in the franchise to come out for the Gameboy. Some say Metroid II is the weakest game in the franchise, but when compared to other Nintendo games, the title is often highly praised.

It was also influential in the development of future games in the series, as Metroid II introduced new abilities and methods of exploration that are hallmarks of the series today. So although it doesn't quite get the hype and attention the way the NES and SNES games do, Metroid II was (and still is) an amazing game. 

Kirby's Dream Land

Kirby's Dream Land introduced players to one of the most lovable video game characters of all time -- and led to plenty of sequels across several consoles. It was also a fantastic game for both younger, less experienced players and well-seasoned gamers.

We don't learn of Kirby's signature pink color and copy ability until later games, but none of that would've happened without Kirby's Dream Land and its success. Overall, the game was well-received and something would be missing if the Classic Mini Gameboy did not have Kirby's Dream Land. The game started "it all" in so many ways.

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What are some of your favorite Gameboy games? Would you purchase a Classic Gameboy Mini if it came out? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

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Rewind Review - Metroid II: Return of Samus https://www.gameskinny.com/p9add/rewind-review-metroid-ii-return-of-samus https://www.gameskinny.com/p9add/rewind-review-metroid-ii-return-of-samus Thu, 09 Jul 2015 02:30:01 -0400 David Fisher

Today is Day 2 of my string of Rewind Reviews on the Metroid series. Last time we went back in time to 1986 and reviewed Metroid on the NES, pointing out the major flaws in-game design that would now be considered unforgivable. This time we will be looking into the franchise's second title: Metroid II: Return of Samus. As with all Rewind Reviews, this game will undergo a review process through the eyes of a 2015 critic, and so nostalgia glasses are not going to spare this game from anything that we - as modern gamers - would expect from the genre today. With that said and done, let's take a look at Metroid II: Return of Samus on the Nintendo Gameboy.

The Plot

Metroid II: Return of Samus takes place almost immediately after the original NES title. After having destroyed the Space Pirate operations on Zebes, the Galactic Federation sent two teams to SR388. Rumours spread after both teams are never heard from again. Fearing that metroids are the cause, the Galactic Federation sends Samus Aran to exterminate the species once and for all.

Samus sets off on another perilous adventure, this time on planet SR388

What the game does give us, however, is a reason for the player to complete their mission. Unlike the first game that tries to tie together several random creatures (i.e.: Ridley, Kraid, and Mother Brain) under one banner, Metroid II: Return of Samus has a simple goal for us: kill all the Metroids because they are killing people. In its simplicity Metroid II excels over its predecessor since we never are detracted from our goal. It is one that we can understand since there is not a lack of story that makes us question why we are doing what we do, and since the game keeps reminding us of our goal with a constantly updating "metroid counter" we know how close we are to achieving said goal.The story - as was the case with the original Metroid - is completely contained within the game's instruction booklet. This is not necessarily a bad thing per se since it once again makes Metroid a game about isolation, not a story driven piece that is reliant on a deep and meaningful story. Unfortunately, the game does not leave much to speculation either. While there are presentations Chozo ruins throughout SR388 that can cause players to speculate how the Chozo are involved, there are no storytelling elements that offer anything more than the booklet already gives us, especially since we don't even know who the Chozo are (even with the booklets).

Gameplay

The Good:

Metroid II has many improvements over its predecessor in terms of gameplay. For starters, players now have save points instead of relying on passwords which saves not only a lot of time, but also sets up a tradition for all future Metroid titles. Another useful feature that repeats itself from this game on is the ability to know what item you have acquired without having to look it up in the instruction manual as each power up has its name presented in the bottom third of the screen upon pickup.

Spider Ball... so that's what the glowing white circle is!

Several new weapons that reappear in future Metroid titles are also introduced in Metroid II. These items include: the spider ball, the spring ball, the spazer beam, and the plasma beam. These items are not merely for show as they greatly increase the variety of puzzles that Metroid II can offer. With the ability to crawl along walls Samus is now able to reach areas on the ceiling. A jumping morph ball also allows Samus to bomb-hop with ease while also speeding up traveling through morph ball sections which prevents pointless hang-time issues where waiting for a bomb to explode was necessary. The variety of the beams also change gameplay as players must decide which of the various beams they would like to use, each providing a single benefit over the other ones. Since players can only use one beam at a time it also prevents the player from being 'over-powered' as we see in later installments to the series.

The game also carries over many of the good features from its predecessor. One of these features is the variety of enemies. Despite being a Gameboy title, Metroid II sports a surprising 43 creature total (7 of which are metroid subspecies), effectively doubling the original number of enemies found in the NES Metroid. 

Each enemy once again sports weaknesses that must be exploited if a player expects to survive the caverns of SR388. The stellar controls of the first game are also back, and this time players can crouch (that's right, Samus finally has knees!) and fire downward while jumping, allowing players to kill those pesky knee-high enemies that were sometimes unavoidable in the first game.

The Bad:

While Return of Samus addresses many of the issues from the first game, and brings back many of the original title's good mechanics, it also brings back some of the bad ones. However, they are slightly improved upon.

One of these features is the lack of a map. While this earned Metroid (NES) an "ugly" gameplay rep, Metroid II did remedy it slightly. By adding save points, making extremely varied tile sets, as well as certain set pieces to the foreground, Metroid II creates at least some variety in the stage layouts. As such we can differentiate one hallway from another based on the number of hills, if a statue was present, or if there was a save point instead of simply counting the number of enemies present in Norfair hallway 1 vs Norfair hallway 2. However, a map is still very much necessary in a game as large as Metroid II since players could easily spend 4 hours going back and forth in the same area wondering where to go next.

The Ugly:

Only one real complaint found in this game that warrants an "ugly" section is one that carries over from the original title: reliance on the instruction booklet. Despite telling us which item we have now, we still don't know how to use the item unless we spend a good 1-5 minutes trying to figure out what the item we picked up does. Sure, we know the spider ball will help us do something like climb up walls while in morph ball form, but how do we use it? The answer: check the instruction booklet.

Samus's greatest weapon in the fight against the metroid menace is her detailed power suit instruction manual. I'm not kidding.

Presentation

Due to the restraints of the Gameboy, Metroid II relies a lot more on the details of each sprite as opposed to colour or shape. This ultimately works in its favour in the best ways imaginable.

The image above presents not only the detail on Samus and her foe, but also the Gameboy's graphical superiority over the NES's graphics processing.

One of the ways this limitation benefits the series as a whole is the redesign of Samus's armor itself. The Power Suit physically changes shape after acquiring the Varia Suit, something that has been a tradition ever since. While in Metroid (NES) the suit changed color, this is the first time the suit has changed shape. This was actually a direct result of the Gameboy's monochromatic format since a different shade of black and white did not allow players to know the difference. Since Samus has had the detail on her armor increased, all enemy sprites have strong defining silhouettes as well. In fact, all objects, tiles, and so forth have been updated to make the game look surprisingly stunning for a Gameboy title, so much so that I could have mistaken it for a 16-bit platform when I first turned on my classic Gameboy system to make notes for this review.

While there are one or two BGM tracks that hit the nail on the head, the number of misses far outweigh the hits.

Unfortunately, with such greatness in visual presentation something must take the hit due to the cartridge's storage capacity. In this case it is the sound design. While not particularly awful, Metroid II sounds like a Gameboy game. Areas such as the Choso Ruins have upbeat themes that sound like they belong in The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons or Ages instead of a Metroid title, while other areas fall silent in terms of BGM with the only sounds being slight trickles of beeps that could simply have not existed.

All that being said, the game's music and graphical presentation combined does allow for immersion, something that the previous game did not do so well with. Playing through Metroid II I did feel a sense of wonder while traveling through the Choso Ruins or diving deep into the caves of SR388. Every monochromatic tile set flows into the next without so much as a hiccup, creating a unified world that feels like an actual breathing environment, unlike the game's predecessor that completely changed the colour scheme without so much as a warning.

Conclusion

While the game is by no means perfect, Metroid II was - and still is - a solid addition to the Metroid series. The game manages to fix many issues that were present in the original Metroid (NES) title, while also adding many new features that would become staples for the games to come. While the game could use some extra features that would undoubtedly improve the gameplay further, they are not so far lacking that the game suffers without them. As such, I for one warmly welcome Samus's return in Metroid II: Return of Samus and give the game a solid 8/10.

This ends Day 2 of my Metroid Rewind Review series. Be sure to check back on this article, or GameSkinny for future reviews as we make our way from the original 1986 Metroid on the NES to the 2010 release of Metroid: Other M.

Reviews in this Series:

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The second one was better! 10 video game sequels better than the originals https://www.gameskinny.com/lpgvt/the-second-one-was-better-10-video-game-sequels-better-than-the-originals https://www.gameskinny.com/lpgvt/the-second-one-was-better-10-video-game-sequels-better-than-the-originals Tue, 19 May 2015 20:04:21 -0400 The Soapbox Lord

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Well that was not too painful right? So which sequels did I miss or make the mistake of including? Let me know in the comments!  

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Bioshock 2

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Wait, what? Am I crazy? (Yes.) Have I lost my mind? (Most assuredly). Don’t run away! Hear me out on this one.

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Yes, Bioshock is a landmark game and by all means a classic which showed what narratives in gaming could accomplish. However, the gameplay and design had some issues. Bioshock 2 added some welcome improvements over its predecessor. The silly pipe matching minigame you had to do when hacking? Gone and replaced with a real-time mechanic that made sense! Dual wielding plasmids and weapons? You betcha! More weapons? Why not?

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Sure, the game was not perfect. The role of the Big Daddy could have been fleshed out more, and there were obvious content cuts for whatever reason: it is still a remarkable game. The multiplayer is not too shabby either! It’s high time we looked back on this game and gave it a fair shake. 

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Street Fighter II

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When the original Street Fighter was released in 1987, no one could have anticipated what the sequel would do to the gaming world. With the release of Street Fighter II four years later, Capcom cemented the series’ legacy and ushered in an era of popularity for the fighting genre.

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Street Fighter II improved upon the original in every way: better graphics and sound, a larger, more varied cast, depth of combat and mechanics, stages. Everything was better. The game was immensely popular and led to many kids losing their lunch money for a chance to play one more time. Capcom is not foolish, and has ported the game to over fifteen systems and consoles. The game has also seen an HD re-release and inclusion in several compilations. If you haven’t played this game by now, please share your secrets with me!

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Star Wars Jedi Knight II: Jedi Outcast

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Before anyone objects to this not being a direct sequel, allow me to explain. The first game in the series was Star Wars: Dark Forces followed by Star Wars Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II while Jedi Outcast was the third one in the series. However, since it is named Jedi Knight II, I am considering it a sequel to 1997’s Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II. It absolutely makes sense!

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Jedi Outcast undoubtedly had a slow start and some strange puzzles, but the payoff was worth it. Once you received your lightsaber and Force powers, the game became an entirely different beast. The combat made players feel like a Jedi slashing through hapless Stormtroopers (don’t forget that dismemberment code!) and using Force powers at will. The duels with Dark Jedi and members of the Sith were among the highlights of this gem. Add in a multiplayer where you could reenact Highlander with your friends, and you have one of the best Star Wars game ever made. The Force is strong with this one. 

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Advance Wars: Dual Strike

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Again, I am cheating here, but Advance Wars 2: Black Hole Rising was more of a map pack than a true sequel; not so with Dual Strike. By releasing on the then-new Nintendo DS, Dual Strike was able to utilize two screens and advanced hardware for the series. Boy did it!

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The addition of a second screen allowed players to absorb tactical info on the fly without having to open any menus. The battles were also massive, with most stretching far beyond your screen. The addition of a tag team mechanic with your commanders (who had powerful abilities that change the tide of battle) allowed for tactics to change on the fly. The addition of multiplayer and some other modes ensured pocket generals had many reasons to return to glorious turn-based warfare. 

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Mega Man 2

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While it may come as a surprise, the original Mega Man was not a huge hit with players or critics. Nevertheless, Capcom trudged on with a sequel and released Mega Man 2 in 1988. The gaming world has never been the same since.

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With Mega Man 2, Capcom unknowingly unleashed a classic onto an unsuspecting populace. Critics and players worldwide were enamored with the Blue Bomber and made the game a critical and commercial success. To this day, the game is regarded as the best in the series, as well as one of the best games ever made, as well as having one of the best soundtracks in gaming! Not too shabby, eh?

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Super Metroid

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Note: Awesome fanart by Elemental79.

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I am cheating a little bit here. Technically, Metroid’s sequel was Metroid II: The Return of Samus for the original Gameboy, which was by no means a bad game. However, Super Metroid is a more worthy and fitting sequel. Released in 1994 for the Super Nintendo eight years after the original Metroid, Super Metroid showed the time away did wonders for Samus.

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Despite releasing at the same time at the PlayStation and Sega Saturn, Super Metroid showed what the SNES could do. With great art design, a terrific soundtrack, tons of new weapons, and a vast world to explore, players were eager to once again step into the power suit of the badass bounty hunter. Who can forget the awesome fight with Mother Brain at the end? Super Metroid is the stuff legends are made of. Now how about an HD remake or a new entry in the series, Nintendo?

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Assassin’s Creed 2

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As much as I have my issues with the series, I cannot deny the impact Assassin’s Creed 2 has had on the series and gaming as a whole. The first Assassin’s Creed was a love-it or hate-it affair. While some gamers loved exploring the world and assassinating targets, many players were annoyed by the lack of mission diversity and wonky controls and combat. Assassin’s Creed 2 changed the naysayer’s tune.

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With improved controls and combat, more mission diversity, and a better-designed world to explore, Assassin’s Creed 2 was everything the first game should have been. However, Assassin’s Creed 2 also started the yearly release cycle Ubisoft continues to foolishly follow. Opposite and equal reactions indeed. 

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Rayman 2

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The first Rayman is a challenging and legendary platformer and just so happens to be the top selling game for the original Playstation in the United Kingdom. The game was by no means a slouch.

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Rayman 2 took the limbless hero into the realms of 3D and the results were one of the best platformers one can play. The transition to the third dimension allowed for more imaginative worlds and levels for our hero to explore. Add great level design, fun abilities, and a hopping soundtrack, and you have a recipe for success! 

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Heroes of Might and Magic 2

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While Heroes of Might and Magic 3 is considered the crowning achievement of the series, you can’t overlook the second entry in the series. The first Heroes of Might and Magic was met with a fairly middling upon response back in 1995. The sequel is what the thrust the series into the limelight and into gamer’s memories and long, long nights of “Just one more turn” syndrome.

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By refining the gameplay, fleshing out the story, and creating the video game equivalent of cocaine, New World Computing ensured players would not be forgetting about this series anytime soon. You can purchase these classics for only $10 apiece; so you get the addictive nature of narcotics without the terrible effects on your health for a bargain! 

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Mass Effect 2

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Mass Effect was an ambitious and terrific game which really showed what the 360 and PS3 could do with its massive scope and gorgeous landscapes. However, the game had issues. Performance issues, technical hiccups, awful inventory management, and clunky combat weighed on the experience, but not enough to ruin it. Mass Effect 2 rectified those issues and then some.

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By streamlining and redesigning the game, the final product played smoother and was a more enjoyable experience. Add in a gripping tale where death is a real possibility and a great cast of characters, and you could forgive BioWare for eliminating a lot of the RPG mechanics from the first game. Mass Effect 2 is a terrific game with one of the best narratives in gaming. And the MAKO no longer handles like a drunken gnome riding a wild boar! A win for all!

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Who doesn't love a good sequel? Since you awesome readers responded so well to my last post on sequels, I proudly present a sequel to my sequel post!  (The irony is thick with this one.)

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As with the last one, the sequels here made improvements over the originals, and in some cases, blow the original completely out of the water. I have also tried to limit the games to direct sequels or else this would go on forever. So shall we begin the sequel to the sequel? (Seriously, I’m making my head hurt with this).

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Top 10 Nintendo Franchises https://www.gameskinny.com/9y3q4/top-10-nintendo-franchises https://www.gameskinny.com/9y3q4/top-10-nintendo-franchises Sun, 28 Sep 2014 22:18:49 -0400 Brian Spaen

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1. Super Mario

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Series highlights:

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  • Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES - 1990)
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  • Super Mario World (SNES - 1991)
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  • Super Mario Galaxy (Wii - 2007)
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What did you expect? Nintendo's favorite plumber is not only their most successful mascot, but it's the most popular. Super Mario titles have sold well and Nintendo has no problems throwing the mascot on a game that may not sell as much, but Mario will spawn title sales.

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Whatever their last names are, both Mario and Luigi deserve getting some props. They've been a part of the Nintendo franchise from the beginning, and it will never dissolve.

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2. The Legend of Zelda

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Series highlights:

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  • A Link to the Past (Super NES - 1991)
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  • Ocarina of Time (N64 - 1998)
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  • Wind Waker HD (Wii U - 2013)
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What else did you expect? We've barely talked about the top-down action adventure with a hint of RPG elements, but it's exactly what the doctor orders after a long week. The long quests featuring Link are both legendary and unique. While the series has gotten a tad stale with the same names again and again, changing things will help them in the long run.

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Ocarina of Time, the first title on N64, is regarded by some (including me) as the best game ever created. Every title's been a stellar hit, but when the games kick ass, you can easily be talked out of it.

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3. Pokemon

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Series highlights:

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  • Pokemon Red/Blue (Game Boy - 1998)
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  • Pokemon Yellow (GB Color - 2000)
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  • Pokemon Crystal (GB Color - 2001)
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You can't deny Nintendo's most infamous small mascots. It's hard to keep track of them all -- especially since they branched out and don't try to play cross-country games. The original concept of having 150 total monsters and needing to play two games and trade with others playing a different cartridge was ideal -- even though you left with no points.

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There's only one franchise -- Pokemon -- that's sold over 260 million total titles in the franchise.

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4. Mario Kart

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Series highlights:

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  • Mario Kart 64 (N64 - 1997)
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  • Mario Kart Wii (Wii - 2008)
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  • Mario Kart 7 (3DS - 2011)
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What was played before Super Smash Bros. ruled the college dorms? Nintendo 64's rendition of the Mario Kart franchise. MK64 is widely hailed as the franchise's high point, and the sequels have since kept up with its formula with the music, sounds, and familiar tracks.

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The Mario Kart franchise is the second-best selling product under the Mario umbrella with over 100 million copies, topping Madden, Assassins' Creed, and even the realistic racer, Gran Turismo.

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5. Donkey Kong Country

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Series highlights:

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  • Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super Nintendo - 1995)
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  • Donkey Kong 64 (N64 - 1999)
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  • Donkey Kong Country Returns (Wii - 2010)
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The Super Nintendo trilogy was one of the most beautiful looking games in the 16-bit era, and while some didn't love the transition to a 3D platformer, the series ultimately fell to a sudden halt after Rare bolted to Microsoft.

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It made a triumphant return nearly 10 years later on the Wii with one of the hardest remakes in the franchise. DKC Returns will give absolutely anybody fits, even the masters of the original platformer during the SNES era. Even though DK64 has its place in history, it's hard to say this franchise doesn't thrive on its 2D brilliance.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/a5cca544ff163d73ea1d04550ce89caa.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/a5cca544ff163d73ea1d04550ce89caa.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"4641","description":"

6. Mario Party

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Series highlights:

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  • Mario Party 3 (N64 - 2001)
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  • Mario Party 5 (Gamecube - 2003)
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  • Mario Party 8 (Wii - 2007)
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Agreed, there's very few Nintendo franchises as uninventive as Mario Party, but I'll be damned if it isn't one of the most fun. Any game will test the patience of any video game player that truly says they don't get pissed if things aren't going their way in a multiplayer contest.

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Despite just having numbers after the titles, each game does have their own feel and uniqueness that fans will be asking for their favorite at a party. Ever have some buddies over and trying to figure out what to do with a case of beer? It doesn't get much better than a round of Mario Party.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/b076a4be2f4fadf6ec8f48cd8a82a493.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/b076a4be2f4fadf6ec8f48cd8a82a493.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"4640","description":"

7. Metroid

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Series highlights:

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  • Super Metroid (Super Nintendo - 1994)
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  • Metroid II: Return of Samus (Game Boy - 1991)
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  • Metroid Prime (Gamecube - 2002)
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It wasn't the best selling Nintendo franchise, but it featured one of the company's most unique and great games. One of the best platformer titles of all time -- Super Metroid -- is a game that many tried to mimic but couldn't duplicate. Even the jump to a first-person shooter felt comfortable because it didn't feel forced, weird, or much different from the predecessors.

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Metroid deserves to sit next to all the other popular Nintendo franchises. It won't be the first that comes off the tongue, but it may have had some of the best games ever created under the company's umbrella.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/f4ef95f8342181dd6e6178435995e282.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/f4ef95f8342181dd6e6178435995e282.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"4639","description":"

8. Wii Sports

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Series highlights:

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  • Wii Sports (Wii - 2006)
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  • Wii Sports Resort (Wii - 2008)
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  • Wii Sports Club (Wii U - 2013)
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Not many people would immediately think about Wii Sports as a franchise, but it's one of Nintendo's most successful games in history. The packaged add-on to the Wii console generated so much conversation that the franchise itself has sold over 109 million copies. Wii Sports was essentially a demo of what the Wii could do in its early stages. Unfortunately, the revolutionary machine couldn't do much past it, and gamers preferred the traditional controller over the Wiimote and Nunchuck combination.

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Still, the original five-sport demo was a blast to pop in whenever you were bored, and the sequel was just as fun with the additional games and play modes -- regardless of how simplified they are. Don't tell me there weren't multiple playthroughs of the 3-point challenge in basketball in Wii Sports Resort!

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/88884d8a60f8c81041ba9da6be907bd0.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/88884d8a60f8c81041ba9da6be907bd0.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"4638","description":"

9. Mario Sports

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Series highlights:

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  • NES Open (NES - 1991)
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  • Mario Tennis (N64 - 2000)
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  • Mario Super Sluggers (Wii - 2008)
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Realistic sports are a blast to play, but sometimes it's fun to add a little bit of craziness to it. Midway had the infamous NBA Jam and NFL Blitz titles, but Nintendo added their own spin with their most popular mascot and his friends. From the NES to the Wii U, Nintendo has always had a wide variety of sports titles featuring the plumber.

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Just trying to narrow it down to three titles is next to impossible. Outside of a solid football title, a popular North American sport, if there's any sport that you want to enjoy on a Nintendo console, a game with the mustached mascot will generally exceed expectations.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/e2ee2a0de4ea597ffc223a087891f8e7.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/e2ee2a0de4ea597ffc223a087891f8e7.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"4637","description":"

10. Super Smash Bros.

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Series highlights:

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  • Super Smash Bros. (Nintendo 64 - 1999)
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  • Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube - 2001)
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  • Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii - 2008)
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Who knew that putting Nintendo mascots in one big four player brawlfest would have become so popular? The series kicked off with the insanely fun N64 debut, but the series hit its high point with SSB: Melee, a game that ruled dorms and parties throughout the turn of the millennium and partly why the Gamecube was as successful as it got. For a series that just has three titles, selling over 22 million copies is a true testament to how fun the game is.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/adda9b230007ac085c64d13f969f8487.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/tiny_adda9b230007ac085c64d13f969f8487.jpg","type":"slide","id":"52367","description":"

There's nothing quite like Nintendo franchises in the video game industry. It's why the Japanese giant continues to publish on their own systems -- there's a huge variety of games that simply can't be found on other consoles or the PC.

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The reason for why the rankings are as they are is a combination of popularity, sales, and the historic value of the series. Each of these franchises own a piece of history that will be stored in Nintendo's vault and be treasured for the rest of time. Generations will pass, and with each new one that comes, they'll get to admire where not only it all began, but the legendary chapters since.

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Enjoy a ranking of the best 10 Nintendo franchises of all time, and debate which you think should be higher or lower on the chart, or if you believe a franchise has been left out.

"}]]]>