Necropolis Articles RSS Feed | GameSkinny.com Necropolis RSS Feed on GameSkinny.com https://www.gameskinny.com/ en Launch Media Network Procedural generation - the future of gaming? https://www.gameskinny.com/67byn/procedural-generation-the-future-of-gaming https://www.gameskinny.com/67byn/procedural-generation-the-future-of-gaming Thu, 11 Aug 2016 06:30:01 -0400 Ty Arthur

When the concept of procedural generation of levels in a video game comes up, its probably the unlikely success of Minecraft and those horribly ugly block universes that come to mind. It's not just gigantic landscapes revolving around building and crafting that utilize the technique, though.

All the way back in 1980, we had even uglier, ASCII text-based procedural levels in Rogue, and the concept was relied on heavily in '98 with the original Diablo. There the levels and loot drops were different on each run through, with only specific bosses remaining consistent.

Fast forward to 2016, and there's a slew of newly released or upcoming games with a heavy procedural emphasis, displaying either different creatures and terrain while discovering new planets or randomizing the layout of a city while fleeing from mobs of angry, drugged-up hippies.

Where Procedural Works

Hearkening back to the classic Rogue, Harebrained Schemes' latest release Necropolis also randomizes the layout and enemy distribution of its dungeon levels, albeit with an updated graphical interface. While the end result had some kinks to work out, its a fun co-op dungeon delve that shows there's still hunger for that style even in the modern day.

With story-lite, combat-focused games, procedural makes sense

Not all games are created equal though, and what works for an action RPG or space exploration sim might not work for shooters or story-based games. Procedural generation also can't always lead to the same memorability of really well constructed levels that have been individually hand crafted by developers instead of an algorithm.

Procedural generation also can't always lead to the same memorability of really well constructed levels that have been individually hand crafted by developers instead of an algorithm.

That style of pre-built game development absolutely has its place, and there are times were procedural generation doesn't make much sense.

It might not work for investigation-based games like Murdered or Heavy Rain (although a Heavy Rain where there's a different killer and set of clues in every playthrough certainly has potential), and I probably wouldn't have wanted the areas in something like Pillars Of Eternity to be procedural, for instance.

In other RPGs it definitely could work, though. Although several of the areas were tied to the story in specific ways, on the whole games like Shadowrun Returns have a style that lend themselves to procedural generation.

While follow-ups Dragonfall and Hong Kong had bigger scope, that first game would have actually been improved if the urban street combat zones or twisting corridors in the depths of a corporate megaplex had utilized more random generation for replayability.

Procedural levels could spice up turn based games like this

Consider other turn based fantasy games from Divinity: Original Sin to Blackguards 2what would have really been lost if some or even all of the dungeons were randomly generated to some degree?

Even a game like Fallout 4 – a bit of a let down from the superior Fallout 3 and Fallout: New Vegas -- honestly wouldn't have been that different with a procedural generation rather than a meticulously placed one (although you might run into issues with quests not interacting properly in massive worlds like that).

And there's no reason why the two worlds can't collide. For instance, larger areas focused on combat or puzzle obstacles in exploration games like Tomb Raider, Uncharted, or even the story-focused The Last Of Us could easily be procedural, with specific, story-based locations appearing at pre-planned intervals.

With sprawling areas across urban locations, procedural saves some work

Procedural generation would even be a boon for existing open world games revolving around capturing locations, from Far Cry 3 to Saint's Row 4 to Homefront: The Revolution. That certainly might make it harder for people like me to write guide material, but could result in a more fun, personalized experience overall for those type of games.

The No Man's Sky Effect

Of course the biggest name right now in procedurally generated worlds is No Man's Sky, showing off just how big a game can be made with this technique. Turn out its currently 18 quintillion planets in 6 gigs of space. The reception to this make-or-break game will play a huge factor in whether the AAA developers take the route displayed by this indie experiment in the future.

Although it (and all other games this year frankly) have already lost to Pokemon: Go, there's no question that No Man's Sky was one of the most buzzed about and anticipated releases of 2016. Just take a look at the army of angry fans who came on to scream their discontent when we suggested the game might not live up to the hype.

An important distinction to keep in mind with the future of gaming is that “procedural” doesn't have to mean “random,” as the devs of No Man Sky have been quick to point out. Truly random generation would result in a large number of bizarre, unplayable, or just actively un-fun planets to explore.

Procedural can result in very exciting terrain, or more standard styles

If the worlds on display end up being consistently interesting and the hype is actually warranted, that's a huge boon for the future of procedural generation. If it's a big empty mass of repetitive or uninteresting garbage...well, that's a different story.

The massive Star Citizen could of course play a role in whether procedural generation works on a large scale and is repeated in the future -- but that game's never going to be finished, so it's essentially a non-entity in this case.

Unexpected Genre Usage

Horror games have the potential to be terrifying for significantly longer stretches before gamers move on.

Beyond role-playing games and space sims, procedural elements are working their way into some unexpected genres, like the surprise (and for some unwelcome) announcement that We Happy Few doesn't utilize a pre-built map connected to the overarching story.

The biggest positive to procedural games is in the replayability, and that's why I'm hoping We Happy Few's approach actually catches on, especially for the horde of VR horror games coming soon.

If the layout of Outlast's asylum had changed up each time after dying, that would have led to less frustration while trying to figure out the narrow, constrained path the developers wanted me to take. Now add in the all-consuming nature of VR and horror games have the potential to be terrifying for significantly longer stretches before gamers move on.

An unlikely combination of styles is on display with We Happy Few

The Future Of Procedural Gaming

While procedural generation currently works best on games that are focused on either exploration or constant combat, there could be more applications for clever developers.

Imagine if those big worlds like Fallout or Grand Theft Auto could procedurally generate the inside of every building, rather than only having specific doors that lead to interior locations. A term like “open world” could actually apply to future games in that scenario.

Pre-made levels are never going to completely go away, and the success of procedural generation relies on developers implementing it well, rather than haphazardly throwing together random creations where levels don't make sense or detract from the story elements.

If those hurdles can be overcome by the increasingly important indie development scene, expect to see the big names following and a horde of randomized games to be cresting the horizon – whether that horizon is galactic or terrestrial in nature.

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Complete necropolis weapon guide https://www.gameskinny.com/6emxt/complete-necropolis-weapon-guide https://www.gameskinny.com/6emxt/complete-necropolis-weapon-guide Sat, 16 Jul 2016 08:27:42 -0400 Ty Arthur

The 4 player arcade experience collides with Dark Souls in Harebrained Schemes' multiplayer dungeon delve Necropolis, pitting you and three doomed friends against a horde of monstrous creatures.

Along the way you'll come across dozens of different weapons to ineffectually use (or accidentally kill your allies with) that all have amusingly useless descriptions and offer no stats or info of any kind other than listing a tier of 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4.

While you could go the long grind route and figure out which weapon type has the most interesting features on your own, you could also instead just briefly peruse our full break down of Necropolis weapons below.

While many of the deadly implements dropped by slain enemies are very similar, the main differences between the weapons are in their animations, speed, and attack arcs, which are determined by type: Shortsword, Longsword, Greatsword, Hammer, Rapier, Axe, and Staff.

For instance, any weapon that is a “shortword” type will essentially have the same basic attack patterns, even if some offer slightly different abilities than others, like fire resistance or increased speed. These differences have all been noted below.

Looking for more Necropolis info? Be sure to also check out our:

Necropolis Tier 0 Weapons

Pariah Blade

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Ultralight

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: A crooked blade. Looks best between the third and fourth rib.

 

Screamer Blade

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Light

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Kind of a "undead warrrior shortsword" sort of thing.

 

Slow Hooked Blade

Type: Light

Heft: Shortsword

Special Abilities: Reduces Speed

Amazingly Useless Description: It's a slow hooked blade.

 

Old Longsword

Type: Longsword

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: A hefty and slightly rusted blade. Weak handle and dull edge. It does the job, just not very well.

 

Hooked Blade

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Light

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Blades given to the Blackguard upon recruitment into the House of the Crooked Street. Um. Forget I said that.

 

Grine Hooked Blade

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Light

Special Abilities: Grine

Amazingly Useless Description: A hooked blade infected by the Grine. Not good.

 

Grine Pariah Blade

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Ultralight

Special Abilities: Grine

Amazingly Useless Description: A Pariah Blade, only Grine-ier.

 

Frozen Pyramid Shortsword

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Light

Special Abilities: Ice Damage, Ice Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: For best use let thaw for 3 hours. Or rest gently in the chest cavity of a warm blooded enemy.

 

Pyramid Shortsword

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Light

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: A bronze shortsword imbibed with mystical energy.

 

Cracked Longsword

Type: Longsword

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: When choosing between this "weapon" and let's say a rabbit; a rabbit's more useful in combat...

You probably want a better weapon than this...

Necropolis Tier 1 Weapons

Thak's Party Starter

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Light

Special Abilities: Pierce Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: Thak quickly found the hoarding business had low margins, he found greater success with this ready made bar fight implement.

 

Blackforest Ham

Type: Hammer

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: It's a Blackforest Ham.

 

Johnys Mallet

Type: Hammer

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: It's Johnys Mallet.

 

Ilarnek Longsword

Type: Longsword

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Ice Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: Every living thing in Ilarnek carried a Longsword. Yes, even the chickens.

 

Pyramid Longsword

Type: Longsword

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: A mystical gold sword alight with unearthly energy.

 

Bopha's Sickblade

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Acid Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: After the flaying and upholstering of Bopha, his soul imprisoned in his weapon. He's serving 231 afterlife sentences in there.

 

Thran Battle Hammer

Type: Hammer

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: Bash

Amazingly Useless Description: Setwa was the greatest weaponsmith in Thran. One day he started on a new hammer, got about half way through, and said “Eh, good enough.”

 

Bopha's Cutter

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Bash, Bash Resitance

Amazingly Useless Description: Bopha solved the Riddle of Ephestrus by cutting his crown in half. I mean, Ephestrus was WEARING the crown, but hey, problem solved.

 

Sword of Cassus

Type: Rapier

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Pierce Damage, Grine Resitance

Amazingly Useless Description: Cassus the unstoppable carried this sword every day of his long life. Except one.

 

That Bastard's Sword

Type: Longsword

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: Bash

Amazingly Useless Description: Not to be confused with a bastard sword. This one just belonged to an awful, awful person.

 

Bob's Fire Sword

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: Fire Damage, Fire Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: Bob arose like a dream from the west. His fire sword is legendary, landing him no end of endorsement deals.

 

Axe

Type: Axe

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: It is an axe. When you hit things with it, they tend to die

 

Hewn Hatchet

Type: Axe

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: A noble warrior inherited a mighty hatchet, he used that one to make this one.

 

Hoardman Axe

Type: Axe

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: A hoardman is only as good as his hoard. This is the primary instrument for gathering a hoard and keeping it.

 

Obisdian Quickblade

Type: Axe

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Forged in the land of Palas, whose people are renowned for the use of slow killing poison. They are not renowned for naming things well.

 

Song of the Night

Type: Axe

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: A tune so soft and sweet, it will put you to sleep.

 

The Master Axe

Type: Axe

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Made by a master, who was a master of making, and not fighting. He would still be alive if he had been.

 

Twilight's Flame

Type: Axe

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: Fire Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: Not as bright as midday's sun, not as dark as the night. That stuff costs extra you know.

 

Pyramid Hand Axe

Type: Axe

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: A golden axe imbibed with arcane power, and a fresh, minty scent.

 

Mister Night Night

Type: Hammer

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Pierce Damage, Reduced Speed

Amazingly Useless Description: First in a series of weapons as centerpieces of children's books—GOODNIGHT VICTIM.

 

Hoardman Hatchet

Type: Axe

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: Fire Damage, Fire Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: Issued at Darat, when the Hoard fell, to the madmen who fought for the Father of Knives (in a freelance capacity).

 

Fist of the Flayed God

Type: Hammer

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Bash, Reduced Speed

Amazingly Useless Description: It is said the Flayed God's skin was ripped off to make the world. As you might imagine, this was a tad upsetting.

 

Sandakar Bastard Sword

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Sandakar was a man of ambition. Always had plans for unrivaled greatness, this is prototype for greatness.

 

Staff of the Unpronounceable

Type: Staff

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Increases Poise

Amazingly Useless Description: The staff that stands between light and darkness—between excitement and boredom—between your hand and the...um...ground.

 

Dun's Bashing Stick

Type: Hammer

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: Bash, Bash Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: If at first you don't succeed, smash and smash again. So said Dun. Every other word was smash, honestly.

 

Pyramid Greatsword

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Twenty-one feet of death.

 

Pyramid Pike

Type: Hammer

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: A golden spear imprinted with mystical energy.

 

Grine Greatsword

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Grine, Grine Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: Oh, you know, only a sword made of the soul-essence of a million damned adventurers.

 

King's Bane

Type: Hammer

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Zar the Great ruled all weapons made must carry his portrait. His men made one, killed him with it, and threw out the rule.

 

Grine Longsword

Type: Longsword

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Grine Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: The grim curse of the Grine infection is sort of like interdimensional cooties.

Not the best, but we're at least getting somewhere now!

Necropolis Tier 2 Weapons

 

Thermias

Type: Longsword

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Fire Damage, Reduced Speed

Amazingly Useless Description: Everyone's favorite sword: Now with more FIRE!

 

Plague Bearer

Type: Hammer

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: Acid Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: Why kill an enemy with blunt force when deadly fungus is just as effective? Why not both?

 

Spectral Shiv

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Light

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage, Increased Speed

Amazingly Useless Description: The blade on this weapon feels cold and almost immaterial. Makes swinging it faster, too.

 

Raven's Wing

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Light

Special Abilities: Acid Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: Successfully marketed on it's dark color and matte finish, which are merely a result of substandard building materials.

 

The Moon Blade

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage, Arcane Resistance, Increased Speed

Amazingly Useless Description: Used by Agar the Terrible in the atrocities of Khar-Gamont, the raid of Ulik, and then as a coat hook for the Demon Ulixsteracktus.

 

Shadowborn Scimitar

Type: Longsword

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Hooked? Check. Giant? Check. Bug? Check. Wait, who made this list?

 

Hand Axe

Type: Axe

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Pierce Damage, Pierce Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: Oota would sing while using this axe (which, if it were embedded in you, would be extremely disconcerting).

 

Hammer of Time

Type: Hammer

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Ice Damage, Ice Resistance, Reduced Speed

Amazingly Useless Description: And they said unto the Monsignor Calamas, Hammer.

 

The Sword of Off-White Skull

Type: Longsword

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Some guy with a pageboy cut wearing fur pants came in swinging this like an idiot.

 

Pyramid Pick

Type: Hammer

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: It's a Pyramid Pick.

 

Shadowborn Bolt Staff

Type: Staff

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Arcane Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: Psst. Hey, want a staff that uh...shoots smashes...thingies?

 

Lightning Hammer

Type: Hammer

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: Capable of generating huge electrical arcs on impact, as well as broiling a steak in seconds.

 

Death's Eye Greatsword

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: So popular, now you can have your own.

 

The Staff of Inscrutable

Type: Staff

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Bash

Amazingly Useless Description: Let's just say, if you had to describe it, it would be...round? That can't be right... Orange?

 

Blackheart

Type: Rapier

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: It's namesake is the man who it comprises it. Black's heart was burned to a cinder and the remains used to color this blade. Gross.

 

Cephil's Tooth

Type: Rapier

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: A life drinker

 

Cleaver

Type: Rapier

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Clever? That's a terrible name for a weapon. Oh... CLEAVER. Sorry, the stains make it hard to read sometimes.

 

Dawn Blade

Type: Rapier

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: With enough volts to put that pep in your morning step!

 

Rage Fang

Type: Rapier

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: This sword is wild. It has a mind of it's own. No, actually a mind of its own. Her name is Tammy, she's a bit rude.

 

Sentinel Blade

Type: Rapier

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: Weilded by Berelaine Sentinels, strange that it's so simply designed. The Berelaine are usually so gaudy.

 

The Lost Blade

Type: Rapier

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Can't seem to find anything written about this one, but I'm sure it's famous or something.

 

Typhal's Point

Type: Rapier

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Typhal was a famed orator, known for arguing long hours before delivering his point and defeating his enemies. This was his point.

 

Stone Cutter

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Increased Poise

Amazingly Useless Description: Once, on the windswept plains of Jandis, a man wandered, dispensing justice. Then some guy with this sword killed him and took his stuff.

 

Frozen Pyramid Pike

Type: Hammer

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Ice Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: Death is as cold as they say.

 

Grine Greatsword

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Grine, Grine Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: A greatsword infected by the Grine. Gross.

 

Sword of Aescapulus

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Like steel justice swooping across a vast...uh...lost my place in the metaphor. Big. Magic sword. Aescapulus was neat too.

 

The Sculptor

Type: Hammer

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Bash, Bash Resistance, Increased Poise

Amazingly Useless Description: Artists work in many mediums. Stone. Metal. ...Viscera? Whatever you say, mister.

 

Rock of the Sky

Type: Hammer

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: When a rock falls from the sky, why not throw some spikes on it and make a weapon?

 

Shell Mace

Type: Hammer

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: Fresh from a local Shell Mage. Try to ignore the sticky parts.

 

Fire Scythe

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Fire Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: A curved and deadly weapon, hot enough to scorch, even you. Gloves optional, but recommended.

 

Sandakar Greatsword

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Fire Damage, Fire Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: Sandakar the weaponsmith loved the sound of children's laughter, but he loved gold even more. It was close.

 You might not die using this. No, you will still die using this.

Necropolis Tier 3 Weapons

Spiked Mace

Type: Hammer

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage, Reduced Speed

Amazingly Useless Description: Legends of Hombur tell that being struck with this weapon is the worst pain someone can feel. People from Hombur are weak.

 

Fenyx's Tines

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Light

Special Abilities: Pierce Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: Fenyx answered the question: "What is better than a blade that pokes a hole in someone?" with "One that pokes 2 holes." Fenyx was smarmy.

 

Blood Sickle

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Light

Special Abilities: Arcance Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: Berelaine war campaigns were intermittable. This was by choice they cut foes with weapons such as these: exsanguination en masse.

 

Shadowborn Longsword

Type: Longsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Pierce Damage, Pierce Resistance, Arcane Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: Does anyone ask about the Shadowborn's hats? No. Their swords get all the attention.

 

Kopeshi Can Opener

Type: Rapier

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: Was used to open cans until it killed 74 people and they repurposed it.

 

Macuahuitl

Type: Longsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Arcane Resistance, Pierce Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: Life ends in strange, often unpronouncable forms.

 

Pronged Hilt

Type: Rapier

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description: It's a pronged hilt .

 

Adder's Tooth

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Medium

Special Abilities: Acid Damage, Acide Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: Seven people died cleaning this blade. Imagine if you hit something with it.

 

Cassilda's Estoc

Type: Rapier

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Pierce Damage.

Amazingly Useless Description:Men would fall at Cassilda's feet. Most with this sword through them.

 

The Wings of Winter

Type: Shortsword

Heft: Light

Special Abilities: Ice Damage

Amazingly Useless Description:If you hold it closely you can hear the wind whistling through the blades.

 

Shadowborn Scatterbomb Staff

Type: Staff

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Fire Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description:Wouldn't it be nice if all work tools could double as terrifying weapons of destruction?

 

Bell Ringer

Type: Hammer

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Increases Poise

Amazingly Useless Description: Have you heard the phrase "cleaning their clock"?

 

Longsword of Expensiveness

Type: Longsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Increases jump height/length

Amazingly Useless Description: Bling with a deathcount.

 

Frozen Pyramid Pick

Type: Hammer

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Ice Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: It's a Frozen Pyramid Pick

 

Staff of Bewilderment

Type: Staff

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description:WHAT?! What is this? My god...a staff. INCREDIBLE.

 

The Subtractor

Type: Axe

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Bash

Amazingly Useless Description: Some tools fix things, others...not...so much.

 

Emerald Knight's Greatsword

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description:Most screams per square foot of any sword ever produced.

 

Crusher Skull Smasher

Type: Hammer

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Can't Be Knocked Back

Amazingly Useless Description: It's almost like no one thought what it would be like to walk around carrying this thing.

 

Sword of Pain

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description:The best part of a sword like this are all the conversations you no longer need to have.

 

Pyramid Greatscythe

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: None

Amazingly Useless Description:Clearly not for farming...food.

 

Spirit Scythe

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: A hooked nightmare of a thing which, strangely, also has a cupholder.

You might actually get somewhere with this one, plus, a cup holder!

Necropolis Tier 4 Weapons

The Sword of Personality

Type: Rapier

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Pierce Damage, Pierce Resistance, Arcane Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: A sword that talks, for some reason which I'm certain will come to mind...any time now.

 

Staff of WTF?

Type: Staff

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: That sure is a staff. Yes indeed. I am ALMOST certain.

 

Axe of the Hunt

Type: Axe

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Acid Damage, Bash Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: It's all whining and screaming until you get to hold the axe. Then it's all OOOHHH nice.

 

Grine Primal Greatsword

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Grine, Grine Resistance

Amazingly Useless Description: Oh boy, now THAT is a Grine infection.

 

Staff of the Rich and Famous

Type: Staff

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Arcane Damage, Can't Be Knocked Back

Amazingly Useless Description: Holding this staff makes you feel like the king of Dalus (before the whole burned alive thing).

 

Soul Morningstar

Type: Hammer

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Acid Damage, Can't Be Knocked Back

Amazingly Useless Description: An ugly thing made for a singular purpose, to um...hit things. Very hard. Sorry. Was that not clear?

 

King's Justice

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Increased Speed

Amazingly Useless Description: Interestingly, King's Justice can be used to answer any question. What's for breakfast? King's Justice. See?

 

The Greatsword of Opulence

Type: Greatsword

Heft: Ultra Heavy

Special Abilities: Increases Poise

Amazingly Useless Description: Every time you swing it, it rains diamonds.

 

Serpent Staff

Type: Staff

Heft: Heavy

Special Abilities: Acid Damage

Amazingly Useless Description: It's the Serpent Staff!

 Get on finding that rare loot so you can look this epic!

These are all the weapons we've come across so far - let us know if you find any other in the procedurally generated levels of the maze!

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Necropolis codex guide https://www.gameskinny.com/mpztd/necropolis-codex-guide https://www.gameskinny.com/mpztd/necropolis-codex-guide Thu, 14 Jul 2016 11:37:21 -0400 Ty Arthur

After delays to work on console versions along with the PC release, Necropolis (reviewed here) is now finally ready to be delved into by foolish blackguards willing to risk their lives for loot.

Pulling from exceedingly difficult series like Darkest Dungeon and Dark Souls, while throwing in the random generation of Rogue style games, you should know ahead of time that your party is going to get wiped out – frequently.

Absolutely any advantage you can come across should be seized immediately -- and there aren't many in this game, as most objects and abilities don't transfer across between different matches.

Screens like these will become very familiar

One of the very, very few permanent effects available in Necropolis are the boons granted by unlocking a Codex. While you can actually only have one single Codex attached to your character at a time, don't overlook the benefits available here, as they can mean the difference between making it another level lower and starting over at the top of the maze again.

The Codices are purchased with Tokens of Favor in the Scriptorium (the small section filled with books that's directly across from the Brazen Head).

Tokens are earned by completing missions, smashing objects, crafting objects, getting more kills, and making it to lower levels before you inevitably die, but they aren't actually handed out until death (or you reach the end of the maze).

Sometimes dying is a good thing!

In addition to offering a boon, equipping your first Codex unlocks the Librarian achievement as well. So what does each Codex actually do? That's a mystery that's being uncovered through trial and error.

Since so much of this game is frustratingly cryptic and poorly defined on purpose, some of the info below may be subject to update. If you've found you got a different response form a Codex, please let us know so we can update the entry!

Looking for more tips on how to stay alive in this crushingly difficult dungeon crawl? Check out our guide to not dying (for slightly longer than normal) here.

Welcome to the Scriptorium!

Codex: Eating is Overrated

Cost: 3 Tokens
  • Effect: Reduces stamina cost of attacking so you have to eat less frequently
  • Useless Description: Man, I ain't hungry, I already ate three weeks ago.

 

Codex: The "I Never Thought I'd Finish" Guide to Recipes

Cost: 3 Tokens
  • Effect: Identifies all potions / scrolls in your inventory automatically
  • Useless Description: Malozapan has done many things. This book is most of them.

 

Codex: Rotten Is Just Another Word for Delicious

Cost: 4 Tokens
  • Effect: Rotten Food benefits increase
  • Useless Description: Throwing up is amateur hour. Eat it, and make it stay down. Show the food who's in charge.

 

Codex: The Shield Goes in Front of You

Cost: 4 Tokens
  • Effect: Reduces the stamina cost of blocking
  • Useless Description: Ok. Shields. Right. Well, the thing about shields is they are really pretty good at... Lost my chain of thought. Huh.

 

Codex: Combat Got You Down? Regenercise!

Cost: 5 Tokens
  • Effect: Greatly increases stamina regeneration
  • Useless Description: Centering oneself without looking like a total dip is kind of difficult, and for God's sake, don't get your nose pierced.

 

Codex: Berzerking - Get That Party Started

Cost: 5 Tokens
  • Effect: Slightly increases attack power and defense 
  • Extraordinarily Useless Description: Is hit. Is other hit. Soon, all hit. Much good.

 

Codex: YOU'RE IT

Cost: 5 Tokens
  • Effect: Increases ranged accuracy and damage
  • Useless Description: There's this place. Different on every monster, but if you can hit that place, they stop dead in their tracks like a statue. Pretty useful.

 

Codex: Half the Fun of Falling Is Missing the Ground

Cost: 5 Tokens
  • Effect: Falling damage is halved
  • Useless Description: In section one, we look at the fall. Where are you falling (an abyss, a fiery chasm, into some beast)? In this, you find the key.

 

Codex: The Burly Ogre's Guide to No Fall Down

Cost: 6 Tokens
  • Effect: Increases poise stat
  • Useless Description: KAMAF NO FALL. YOU NO FALL. NO FALL IS GOOD.

 

Codex: Gud's Necropolis Survival Guide

Cost: 6 Tokens
  • Effect: Reveals all potion recipes 
  • Useless Description:  You beat it, you eat it. A survivor's guide to cooking and crafting in the Necropolis.

 

Codex: The Burly Ogre's Guide to Smashing Stuff

Cost: 7 Tokens
  • Effect: Increases knockback with heavy hits
  • Useless Description: KAMAF HIT GOOD. THING GO FAR. YOU HIT GOOD. THING GO FAR. GOOD.

 

Codex: 50? 40 Is a Lot of Money. What Do You Need 30 For?

Cost: 7 Tokens
  • Effect: Shop prices (other than Codices) reduced 
  • Useless Description: You don't want to part with it and I don't want to pay for it. Let's meet in the middle.

 

Codex: You Can't Hit What Isn't There

Cost: 9 Tokens
  • Effect: Lowers the stamina cost of walking / jumping / dodging
  • Useless Description: Don't think of it as dodging. Think of it as not agreeing to be hit.

 

Codex: Mr. Monk's Most Excellent Pamphlet on Avoiding Exhaustion

Cost: 10 Tokens
  • Effect: Reduces overall stamina loss
  • Useless Description: The key to not getting exhausted is to realize all motion is illusion; the world is that which spins about the mind. Now wasn't that easy?

 

Codex: That's Not so Far

Cost: 10 Tokens
  • Effect: Increases jump length / height
  • Useless Description: I can totally make that jump. Totally. Now you can too!

 

Codex: Carpe Per Diem

Cost: 12 Tokens
  • Effect: Each gem picked up instead gives you two gems
  • Useless Description: The feel of a gem in the pocket is second only to the feel of two gems in the pocket

 

Codex: Keeping Your Blood on the Inside (And Other Tips)

Cost: 12 Tokens
  • Effect: Regenerate small amount of health every 15 seconds
  • Useless Description: Once, in one-on-one combat, I just stood there and the guy stood there, and eventually, he died from heat exhaustion. True story.

 

Codex: The Key to a Good Defense, Is a Good Defense (Stupid)

Cost: 12 Tokens
  • Effect: Immune to knockdown attacks
  • Useless Description:  Ok. So there's something that wants to stick you, yeah? Well, here's what you do: First - wait, are you wearing armor?

 

Codex: Unlock Your Inner Power Potential

Cost: 14 Tokens
  • Effect: Halves the exhaustion of power attacks
  • Useless Description: Mantaining personal power is a matter of simply looking reality in the face and saying, in effect, "Nope."

 

Vampirism is your friend

Cost: 17 Tokens
  • Effect: Player heals 5% of damage dealt to enemies
  • Useless Description: Drink your way to a 'healthier' you. Blood is the answer you are looking for!

 

Enjoy your reading time!

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How to stay alive (slightly longer) in Necropolis https://www.gameskinny.com/su7fl/how-to-stay-alive-slightly-longer-in-necropolis https://www.gameskinny.com/su7fl/how-to-stay-alive-slightly-longer-in-necropolis Wed, 13 Jul 2016 05:55:32 -0400 Ty Arthur

It's time for some lo-fi dungeon delving shenanigans!

Whether solo or with a full complement of four players hooked up via Steam/GOG, there are 10 levels of the Necropolis' inverted pyramid layout to plunder (or more likely die repeatedly while sadly attempting to plunder).

If you're just getting started in this Roguelike / Souls mashup, the layout and play style will be quite unfamiliar and require some adjustment on your part, and that's why we are walking you through all the basics of staying alive for a few minutes longer than your friends.

Necropolis Character Options And Mechanics

First off, it's important to note that despite what the PAX footage might have indicated prior to launch, there aren't actually character classes in Necropolis, so there's no difference between the various options chosen when you start a match.

The Daughter of Erewo has absolutely no mechanical play difference from the Son of The Seas Of Glass, for instance. The color differences are solely cosmetic so you don't all look the same while getting slaughtered by the denizens of the maze.

He's as good as any other soon-to-be corpse.

After choosing your certain-to-fail adventurer, be sure to stop and study the control scheme on the wall at the pyramid's first room. There's a reason it's boldly displayed in a way you can't possibly miss -- there's no key binding of any kind in this game. What you see is what you have to play.

There's also one other mechanical issue that may get in the way of your survival. Having trouble with the utterly spastic and insane camera that swings a thousand yards when you barely tick the mouse a millimeter? Be sure to turn the mouse sensitivity down (as in all the way down) in the settings to reach a manageable level, as even the 50% setting is likely to induce motion sickness.

You want to learn this before delving any further.

Exploring The Necropolis

Since the game's levels are generated differently every time, there are no maps to help you or walkthroughs that will explain where to get specific objects or find certain enemies. Though despite the randomized nature, there are specific boons and hazards to look out for on your short journey.

Always run up and check the writings on the walls, even if you've already gotten sick of reading the silly text. Most of the time its gibberish, but sometimes the wall writing triggers a segment to recess and reveal a secret loot stash, and you don't want to miss those.

Sometimes these are actually useful. Sometimes.

While running through the maze-like corridors of Necropolis, keep an eye out for anything that looks remotely different from the normal floor pattern. These areas are generally traps waiting to spring.

While a square segment on the ground filled with holes is obviously a spike trap (and you wouldn't walk over that, now would you?) others are a little more devious. The growing red lines, for instance, are only dangerous for short periods when they begin to flash, with vines reaching up to hold you in place while lowering your health.

Did you seriously run over this while it was flashing a dangerous red?

Necropolis Combat Basics

Combat is very basic in Necropolis, but there are a few different ways to approach any given enemy. You have two different types of swings with whatever weapon is equipped, as well as the ability to charge your swing for an area effect strike.

Charging for a whirlwind circular swing is very handy when there are loads of enemies nearby, but it greatly drains your stamina, and even reduces your max stamina until you eat, making you less effective in combat in the long run.

Each weapon also has a different arc, width, and damage level when you perform this charged attack, so try it out with different types of swords and axes!

Surrounded? Charge a swing!

While charging up those area swings, be sure to keep in mind that deadly friendly fire is always turned on, so don't hit your friends! On the flip side of that coin, enemies can also hit each other, so luring them together into a clump and then dodging backwards is often a better strategy than swinging your sword at all.

Don't forget that attacking, jumping, and dodging back all use stamina (the bar situated below your health indicator), so don't swing rapidly without thinking, as you won't be able to dodge when you need to avoid a blow.

Dodging isn't your only method of avoid damage though, so be sure to raise your shield, as it does deflect most basic attacks, although only directly in front of you.

When putting all these various combat tactics together, survival in Necropolis requires learning the attack patterns of each type of enemy so you know when to block or dodge and then quickly strike when the creature is overextended and gearing up for the next attack.

By learning the patterns even groups of enemies become easier to face.

Necropolis Progression

When first starting the game you will probably be wondering at the odd lack of numbers anywhere on the screen. By design, there are no visible stats other than your health and stamina – you have to figure out which weapons do more damage through trial and error.

Even the descriptive text of each dropped sword or bow is no help, as that's frequently more focused on humor than telling you anything useful. The only visible difference is the item's tier of 0 – 4, with higher tiers obviously being more desirable.

Is a cracked longsword worse than anything else? Pick it up and find out!

Not much in the game is persistent, but codexes do remain attached to your character. Bought with tokens of favor, these codexes available on the top floor offer various (ill-defined) boosts that remain with you across different playthroughs even after you die.

You can only have a single codex equipped at a time, so there's no danger of them making one blackguard an unstoppable powerhouse above the other three players.

If you want more gems and tokens of favor at the end of a playthrough, be sure to go after the randomized missions handed out by the Brazen Head, like collecting X food, killing X vermin, plundering X chests, and so on.

Perusing the codex pile!

With these basic Necropolis strategies in mind you should be able to survive a whole level or two before getting ganked by a horde of killer crabs or animated suits of armor. Good luck making it to the bottom of the maze!

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Delve into the Necropolis and have fun dying with friends https://www.gameskinny.com/4qo7b/delve-into-the-necropolis-and-have-fun-dying-with-friends https://www.gameskinny.com/4qo7b/delve-into-the-necropolis-and-have-fun-dying-with-friends Wed, 13 Jul 2016 06:11:43 -0400 Ty Arthur

Yours truly approached the much-hyped Necropolis with a serious mixture of excitement and trepidation.

I was expecting to either hate this game with a fiery passion or perhaps unexpectedly fall in absolute love.

Mixing Different Genres

How could it be so, you ask? Well, for starters, I absolutely adore Harebrained Schemes and have been following the developer closely since the Kickstarter for Shadowrun Returns way back in 2012.

Without being graphical powerhouses, those games still managed to overtake my life for extended periods, so it seemed like Necropolis would be more than capable of doing the same. On the other end, I wasn't excited about early descriptions of the gameplay, citing Darks Souls meeting the Roguelike genre.

Although I dig Darkest Dungeon despite its insane difficulty, my feelings towards the Souls series of “games” is probably best described as “active dislike” (frustration simulators aren't actually games, folks – they are work that you don't get paid for).

...and I'm dead again.

Add in the procedural Roguelike elements and offbeat art style and it was a total tossup whether this game would be worth playing.

Knowing What To Expect

After having spent a good amount of time playing both solo and multiplayer, I can now say that Necropolis is a lot of fun – even for people like me who don't enjoy Dark Souls - but definitely not a perfect game.

Unlike either of the previously mentioned devastatingly difficult games, Necropolis doesn't shy away from the humor at all, adding in a darkly comedic element as the game's all-seeing god called the Brazen Head openly mocks you (or entirely forgets what's going on).

Hey, me too!

The graphical presentation is also much different than one might expect for the gameplay, with the visuals somehow meeting at the intersection of Minimalist Boulevard and Hyper Stylized Avenue.

While some don't care for them or feel they aren't advanced enough, those people seem to be missing the point. The minimalist lines and empty spaces are meant to evoke a graphical rendition of those old ASCII text Roguelike games, and viewed in that light Necropolis is a good mix of nostaglic wonder and modern gaming.

Challenging Gameplay

Although the game can be played solo, Necropolis is clearly meant for groups of 2 – 4 friends to get together and play online, and the experience does radically change in that format.

Sadly, there doesn't seem to be matchmaking at this point, and you must play solely with Steam friends. If you manage to have a group of buddies to help revive you though, unlike with Dark Souls, you aren't going to see the “You Have Died” screen every 90 seconds.

It's a lonely road to walk alone...

That's not to say there isn't a steep difficulty here to keep fans glued to the screen, though. At first the mobs of monsters will roll right over you, but after a few tries its not tough to learn the attack patterns and figure out when to block or dodge and counterattack.

The real challenge here is staying out of your companions' way! That's right – friendly fire is always on, and it's a killer.

Using a super charged spin attack for instance is incredibly effective -- although highly stamina draining -- when getting swarmed, but you are pretty well guaranteed to hit somebody else who is also trying to deal with that same mob of enemies.

When you get into a groove with your party though, there's a serious sense of accomplishment when grabbing nifty new equipment and making it alive through an area.

There's a fellow GameSkinny writer, wisely fleeing the mob I ran right into

There is one challenge that seems a bit unintentional, however, and that's the spastic camera that moves at blazing light speed. Seriously, the camera man has apparently acquired quite a meth habit and can't seem to stop twitching and overreacting.

When trying to slightly shift my view point to face an enemy coming from the side I repeatedly ended up doing a near 360, facing away from the enemy and swinging at empty air while they pummeled my exposed back. It's a system that takes getting used to while dying repeatedly.

Yes, I know. Mock me some more why don't you?

No Hand Holding

Much of the game is purposefully shrouded in mystery, sometimes to an infuriating degree, which could be a pro or a con depending on how you like to play games.

On the one hand, it's fun to learn by trial and error what each weapon does and how many hits they generally take to destroy each type of enemy -- while on the other, it seems inevitable RPG fans will get frustrated by having no idea what items do or what a weapon's stats look like.

Is that potion going to help me right now when I need it or kill me dead? No idea, just drink it. Will this sword be useless? Could be, better pick it up and start swinging anyway. What the heck do these codexes do that I unlocked after hours of playing? Couldn't tell ya, but I'm sure gonna equip 'em.

A crafting system is present that's much more clear, however, so there's some solid RPG ground to find your footing on that front.

Mix fungus and torn flesh and put the results in my mouth? Why not!

The Bottom Line

As a procedurally-generated entry, your group of dungeon delvers does start over at the top of the maze each time there's a total party wipe, but thankfully the layout and creatures significantly change on each successive trip, so there's less repetition than you might imagine.

With the lack of level progression (outside of finding higher tier equipment), skill trees, or any sort of stat building, Necropolis is essentially some good old mindless fun for hacking and slashing with friends, rather than something to sink hundreds of hours into.

Now that this game is finally finished, the devs from Harebrained can get on wrapping up that amazing looking Battletech reboot they've got going...

Note: GameSkinny was provided a copy of this game to review. 

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