Revelations: Persona Articles RSS Feed | GameSkinny.com Revelations: Persona RSS Feed on GameSkinny.com https://www.gameskinny.com/ en Launch Media Network Ranking the Persona Franchise From Best to Worst https://www.gameskinny.com/3el6m/ranking-the-persona-franchise-from-best-to-worst https://www.gameskinny.com/3el6m/ranking-the-persona-franchise-from-best-to-worst Thu, 13 Apr 2017 08:00:01 -0400 Ty Arthur

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Across a whole lot of genres and console generations, we just can't get enough of this oddball series that loves to fuse dating sims, monster raising, real life high school simulations, and JPRG combat.

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With all these titles, you could lose yourself in Persona for countless hours before even diving into the other spin-off series!

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What did you think of our listing, and how would you rank your favorite Persona games from best to worst?

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Worst: Persona 4 Arena

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Like the previously mentioned Ultimax, this is a fighting game spin-off, but it's not quite as polished or interesting as its sequel. It is notable for more of a heavy rock soundtrack than the other games in the series, whoever.

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Frankly, other than the bigger focus on story and the presence of Persona characters, this isn't really ground breaking as a fighting game and can probably be safely skipped.

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if you don't want to play a fighting game but want to know how this tale fits into the Persona universe, you can easily find all the story segments strung together at YouTube.

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Persona Q

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Persona goes chibi on this lone DS entry (for a look that I'm not crazy about) where the series managed to break away from Playstation to hit a Nintendo handheld for no apparent reason.

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It also fuses characters from P3 and P4 into an alternate dimension taking place between those games, offering a new take on those familiar storylines and NPCs. How much you are going to dig this one depends on how much you like the handheld RPGs, as this is very much Etrian Odyssey meets Persona

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Personally, it felt a little too familiar for me, and I'd have rather seen a completely different game with totally new characters, but if you can't get enough of the Persona 3 / 4 crews, then this may be worth it for you.

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Persona 4: Dancing All Night

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Wait, what the hell, there's a dancing rhythm game spin-off as well? Eh, after the fighting game, I guess why not just go with it?

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Like with Arena and Ultimax, the bizarre PS Vita entry Dancing All Night has way more story than you'd expect from something in the same category as Guitar Hero and Dance Dance Revolution.

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This one takes a minor character from Persona 4 and spins off in a new direction, taking the series into the world of J-Pop. Its more fun than you'd expect, but honestly I have a hard time taking this one seriously.

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Revelations: Persona

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I fully came into this list expecting to put this entry all the way at the top, having very fond memories of playing this as a kid. The totally different setting from your typical fantasy RPG set Persona drastically apart from the pack.

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This was also definitely the first game I played where negotiating with demons before fighting was an option, with violence completely avoidable in many random battles.

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Between the game starting with a bunch of kids messing around with summoning demons, and one character's fondness for explaining the flaws in Western religion's theology, I had to play this one on the down low when my religious parents were around -- which of course just increased its mystique.

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While ranking these games I went back to the original PS1 edition and a sad realization dawned on me: this game has not aged well.

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Though groundbreaking at the time, It's kind of difficult to play at this point due to the clunky controls, and some of the graphics (particularly when navigating outside or through the labyrinthine hallways of high school dungeons) are sort of spectacularly bad.

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Some of those kinks are worked out with the '09 PSP port, although going that route also loses some of the charm of the original sounds and cut scenes.

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Persona 4 Arena Ultimax

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Wait a minute, this is... a fighting game? Unlike the super ill-fated D&D fighting game spin off, this one is actually worth playing for beat 'em up fans, although maybe less so for the Persona die hards who prefer a JRPG experience.

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Oddly enough, this is actually the SECOND fighting game in the series, following the previous Persona 4 Arena. What sets Ultimax apart from anything else in the genre is that there's a whole lot more story going on here than you'd expect from a Street Fighter style game.

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That could be good or bad depending -- good for Persona fans who want to see these characters, but probably bad for fighting game fans who don't want to read screen after screen of text.

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This one's better than its predecessor, but at the end of the day anyone playing is going to have to  ask themselves: just who is the target audience here?

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Persona 2: Eternal Punishment

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This forgotten classic of the series was released at the very tail end of the PS1's life cycle as the PS2 was coming to dominance, so Eternal Punishment didn't make as big an impact as it could have were it released earlier in prime PS1 RPG time.

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Eternal Punishment was still figuring out its various systems and hadn't perfected them yet, but was a big jump up from the original game. Its also interesting to note that it wasn't actually the second Persona game -- it was the third.

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Previous game Innocent Sin didn't make it to the U.S. on the PS1 at all and in fact didn't arrive for North American audiences until 2011 on the PSP. Obviously, the story of Eternal Punishment could be confusing at times, since none of us had ever played its predecessor.

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While it may have been a bit baffling at points, it was also incredibly dark (like Rule Of Rose dark) and will always remain with those who played through as kids and had no idea what they were in for. Horror fans will particularly note elements taken from the Cthulhu mythos, like a character named Nyarlathotep.

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Persona 4

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The position this game takes is really a matter of personal preference, and I suspect may have something to do with which game you played first and where you started in the series.

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Some fans will fight to the death over their preference of Persona 4 to Persona 3 -- and vice versa. I'm more in that second camp that prefers the earlier game. Not that there's anything particularly wrong with this entry (note its high ranking in this list), but the characters, music, and style of 3 just edge this one out.

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This one had a bit of a different tone than the previous games, being more of a murder mystery. It's also notable for taking the social link system from the previous game and expanding it even further.

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While Persona 4 originally came out for the PS2 all the way back in '08, a remake titled Persona 4 Golden was released on the PS Vita in 2012, bringing the series back to the forefront in the long, long wait for Persona 5.

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Persona 3 FES

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This entry is when the North American audiences really started to take notice of the series, which had a cult following prior but really wasn't on the same level as anything like Final Fantasy.

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Persona 3 is where the series hit its stride with managing relationships to increase rankings in various abilities and in splitting your time between monster raising, battling enemies, and being a high school student in the day. While more accessible than the earlier PS1 entries, Persona 3 is also notable for being quite difficult if you were trying to do everything.

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Some of those requests from Elizabeth were incredibly hard, and there were a few boss fights that could easily wipe you out if you weren't holding a guidebook in your hands letting you know which specific Persona to be fusing ahead of time.

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What always strikes me most about this entry is the incredibly memorable music that bucked the trend of what you'd hear in a typical JPRG. From the "baby, baby, baby, baby" of the combat music to the operatic take on the Velvet Room, you won't ever forget these tunes. Even the high school hallway theme had an electronic beat you can't get out of your head.

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It wasn't all sunshine and gumdrops when Persona 3 was first released however, as the title caused some controversy. Characters point a gun at their foreheads and pull the trigger in a representation of the death of self to release a secondary inner persona. Needless to say, parents weren't stoked about imagery of teenagers repeatedly shooting themselves.

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Best: Persona 5

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The latest (and many are saying greatest) entry in the series was bestowed on Western fans a full half year after the Japanese market got ahold of it. It's been a tense six months for those of us longing for more Persona, but now that it's here, the wait was worth it.

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We've covered the game extensively, and for good reason: Persona 5 takes everything that made the earlier games memorable and fun to play and cranked that all up to the next level.

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This entry is incredibly stylized, and every single element of the game - from conversation to crafting to battles -- just constantly keeps that style front and center, with the themes of the story constantly woven into absolutely everything the protagonist does.

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Part 5 is also easily the best instance of the time management aspect of the series, where you are trying to both be a successful student with interpersonal relationships, jobs, study time, etc. and a Phantom Thief hero battling Shadows at night. Blessedly, the game also doesn't take 40 hours to give you a story like Persona 3.

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For those not familiar, Persona is a totally different beast altogether than other prominent JRPG series like Final Fantasy or Dragon Quest.

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Frequently focusing on high schoolers on Earth rather than knights in fantasy worlds, the series is known for button-pushing dark themes and stories that delve into the metaphysical and the philosophical. Throw in monster raising and some light dating sim elements, and you've got the Persona franchise.

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Here we're going to cover all the games from best to worst to let you know which titles are worth your time and which can be played later after getting to the good stuff first. "Worst" may be a bit of a misnomer however, as there really aren't any actively bad Persona games, even if some are clearly better than others.

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We're trying to be as complete as possible in this list, but a few spin offs are getting left out, like the defunct browser game or several Japanese-only mobile titles. Although they are closely connected, we're covering exclusively Persona branded games here and not any of the Shin Megami Tensei or Devil Summoner titles.

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If you go all the way back to the series beginning in the late '80s on the Famicom, there are just way, way, way too many to cover, and many of them never got English translations. For those who ever played them though, please feel free to comment with your favorites!

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Project Re Fantasy Gets New Concept Art, Video and Website https://www.gameskinny.com/ghtk7/project-re-fantasy-gets-new-concept-art-video-and-website https://www.gameskinny.com/ghtk7/project-re-fantasy-gets-new-concept-art-video-and-website Sat, 24 Dec 2016 05:12:39 -0500 Danny21_2396

After Atlus' livestream on Nico Nico Douga, we now know a little bit more about Project Re Fantasy, the studio's new medieval fantasy RPG project. For one, Studio Zero now have their own website, where gamers will able to find every bit of information about the studio and the game they'd ever want to know. There's also a message from Katsura Hashino, the game's Producer and Director, some beautiful artwork for the game and a concept video at the end.

For those of you who don't know Japanese, here's Katsura's message translated in full:

25 years ago, the Atlus RPG uttered its first cry. Speaking of RPGs in those days, the stories of morality in so-called medieval fantasies worlds were mainstream. The Shin Megami Tensei series was released as an “opposition” to such a “common” world view, and the Persona series was released as its spin-off. Both series, even today in their latest entries, have always been made with the concept that it will be a counter to the times. And now how will Atlus, which has been creating counters to such eras, approach a new RPG? That is, to challenge the norms of the genre users have already been consuming for decades in various media on a regular basis.

So, we have succeeded at contemporary drama so far, but the next RPG theme is nothing other than a return to a “true fantasy world.” We firmly believe that to make this beautiful gaming experience, going somewhere among all the games made about overflowing fantasy worlds only we can go, is a counter to the current era. As only the creators of Shin Megami Tensei and Persona can do, we’ll offer players all around the world a “true journey” based on the themes and essence at the foundation of those two titles. By all means, please come and witness this challenge.

Also, if you think you got what it takes to help Studio Zero with the game's development, Atlus is currently recruiting staff for the project. If you're near Sangenjaya in Setagayaku, Tokyo, you can apply for the position here.

As the game is still in its early stage of production, Atlus and Studio Zero can't confirm when, or on which platform, gamers will see the game. Even the concept video above doesn't show any footage of the game, but talks more about the concept and challenge of making an unorthodox game. But Atlus has stated that they will make a game that only Atlus and the Studio Zero team can make. And we can be sure they won't let us down.

Stay tuned on GameSkinny for more info about Project Re Fantasy.

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Why Can't Developers Make Classic Franchises Great Forever? https://www.gameskinny.com/u47en/why-cant-developers-make-classic-franchises-great-forever https://www.gameskinny.com/u47en/why-cant-developers-make-classic-franchises-great-forever Wed, 19 Oct 2016 10:00:01 -0400 Eliot Lefebvre

Mega Man. Sonic the Hedgehog. Final Fantasy. Resident Evil. Silent Hill. These are just a small number of franchises that helped define my personal gaming history. And they're also franchises with fans who react to new titles with less "oh, great!" and more "ugh, not again."

This is kind of an inversion from the earlier days of gaming; I remember that there was once an unofficial rule that movie sequels were always terrible while game sequels were always good. In several of the above cases, the franchises even have provided some great games along the way, but they're also games that didn't connect with the long-time fans who would have been eagerly awaiting the next installment.

So why aren't older franchises evergreen? Why do the games you loved two decades ago not lead to more games in the same style now? The answer is that there are a lot of reasons why classic franchises aren't great forever, and it's helpful to understand why that's the case.

The people responsible have left...

When people start listing the great Silent Hill games, they always include the first three, usually including the fourth with a bit of a grudging nod, and pretty much never include the later games. Incidentally, the first four games were the only ones developed by Team Silent at Konami, with each subsequent installment developed by a completely different team.

Does that surprise you? It shouldn't. The creative team behind a game can really inform a lot of what goes into the actual game, and that goes beyond just saying that the original designers are always the best at designing a franchise. Teams that work together and develop multiple games can often produce games that feel very similar to one another in a positive way, but once people move on or new people come on board, the games they produce often feel very different even if they have the same core ideas. When Inafune left Capcom, that didn't stop the publisher from making more Mega Man games... but it also meant that the original creator wasn't there any longer, and that was after several staff and platform changes.

You can't just hand off tasks to an endless series of different people who don't necessarily understand the appeal of the original games. Watching a team really nail a franchise for multiple installments is a thing of beauty; witness the past few Persona titles, for example. But it's never permanent.

...and they might not have the spark left anyway

Here's a fun fact: Hideo Kojima wanted to leave the Metal Gear franchise after every single title. Why does Metal Gear Solid 2 end with such a bizarre, nonsensical cliffhanger? Because Kojima never intended to resolve it. He didn't want any lingering cliffhangers after the first Metal Gear Solid, he wanted to make that and be done with it. But he kept getting pulled back for another one, resulting in an ongoing contest of wills in which the franchise just would not die.

It's not just a matter of spite, though; playing through Mighty No. 9 repeatedly made me think that maybe Inafune needed to hang up his hat, that he just didn't have any more Mega Man in him. The reality of that, is that it's fine. Games are art like any other form, and it's fine to hand off the reins to someone new after a while. It just means that you are going to see a different sort of game, probably one that doesn't exactly resemble the originals.

The franchise has evolved past your memory

Final Fantasy was Hironobu Sakaguchi's last game ever. That was the plan. He made a game he never expected to sell as a wild experiment, so he could leave the field happy. Instead, it wound up becoming a huge success, resulting in a long-running series that has always brought on a wide variety of different developers and storytellers to make a series of games that are not meant as direct sequels to one another.

When people complain that, say, Final Fantasy XIII feels so different from classic Final Fantasy games, it stands out simply because most of those classic games also feel so different from one another. The franchise is built on doing something new with every single installment, and while some of the conceptual walks are further than others, you'd be hard-pressed to find a single pair of games that feel like the same game with a different set of wrappers.

The bright side is that it means that each new title is something fresh and different. The down side is that if you buy Final Fantasy XIII expecting Final Fantasy VI but new, you're going to be disappointed. The exchange for a franchise never getting stale is that it doesn't maintain the same shape indefinitely.

The environment has changed too much

You could not release Resident Evil today as a brand-new game without the weight of the franchise behind it. The game's awkward controls and pre-rendered backgrounds worked in no small part because of when it was released; if it was launched today it would be panned for bad acting, bad storytelling, weak gameplay, and poor graphics.

All that is fine. But there's an attached point that's easy to overlook: every new release in a franchise is the first release for someone. Yes, you've been playing Sonic the Hedgehog since the oddly stutter-stop motion of the first game in the series, but to someone out there, the most recent game starring a blue hedgehog is the first one they've ever played. And the fact of the matter is that these franchises need to evolve, simply to continue marketing themselves against legions of other games who have been inspired and influenced by these originals.

This is particularly true of older games that marketed themselves on punishing difficulty designed to artificially extend the game by eating up quarters. (Even if you didn't actually have quarters.) No one is willing to buy a new game for $60 that you can blow through in an hour but takes you time to beat because you just keep getting killed consistently. That means that designers need to bulk out the game in some way, and in the case of franchises that traditionally work on the basis of straightforward smashing sequences, it means that the core needs to change to account for the new gaming environment.

There's no longer a market

It barely needs to be said that the gaming market and environment is very different now compared to where it was in, say, 1990. And yes, some of that is as simple as the fact that video games are no longer exclusively sold in the back reaches of department stores who might put one or two on the shoe racks if they find the box, but it goes much further than that. The availability of gaming devices, the ways we engage with games, the budgets of big titles... everything is different.

This means that even old franchises need to adapt and change, as mentioned above, but it goes beyond bulking out games. Our patience for some features has evaporated, while our patience for others has increased. When Blizzard first launched StarCraft, online play was a novelty that was essentially just a bonus; when StarCraft II came out, it was a major component of the game.

Unfortunately, it does mean that some of the stuff you loved from back in the day just doesn't stick around. But on the bright side, it means that there's a neverending stream of new things. We live in a world with such a maddening surfeit of gaming options that even if your favorite franchise goes in a direction you no longer care for, there are still so many new games out there. You can almost certainly find something that appeals specifically to you.

Or you can just play Pokémon. I mean, let's be real, that gameplay isn't changing much until the heat-death of the universe.

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Can't Wait For Persona 5? Check Out These Other Games in the Megami Tensei Franchise! https://www.gameskinny.com/2dymg/cant-wait-for-persona-5-check-out-these-other-games-in-the-megami-tensei-franchise https://www.gameskinny.com/2dymg/cant-wait-for-persona-5-check-out-these-other-games-in-the-megami-tensei-franchise Tue, 07 Jun 2016 04:52:54 -0400 cactusjudy

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Digital Devil Saga
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Although one the lesser-known titles in the franchise, Digital Devil Saga and its direct sequel Digital Devil Saga 2 are some of Megami Tensei's most critically-praised and fan-beloved games due to their deep, dark plots and morally complex and troubled characters. Digital Devil Saga follows a tribe of humans stuck in a disaster-ravaged digital world, who become infected with a demon virus that grants them demonic powers. The characters must fight (and cannibalize) competing tribes in order to escape their dying world, despite their own personal aversions to violence. The sequel follows many of the characters from the original as they explore a new world with new villains, threatening organizations, apocalyptic disasters, secrets to uncover, and intense moral dilemmas. In 2011, the series was named the "Top RPG of the Last Decade" by RPGFan, an impressive accomplishment for an older and little-known title.

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Both Digital Devil Saga and Digital Devil Saga 2 are available on the PlayStation 2

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With so many Persona-like games you can't have played them all. Now you can go back and play some of the best games in the Shin Megami Tensei franchise. The hard part is picking which you want to play while waiting for Persona 5.

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Devil Summoner: Soul Hackers
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The Devil Summoner series exists comfortably within the mystery genre, following a cast of characters who must use demonic allies in order to investigate strange occurrences in their world. In order to win over demons to their side, players must answer questions correctly, give them gifts, and not force them to perform unwanted moves. Additionally, certain demons refuse to fight side-by-side, so one's team of demons must be constructed carefully.

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Although the first Devil Summoner game has not yet made it across the ocean, the sequel, Soul Hackers, was brought over to America and Europe on the 3DS in 2013. Soul Hackers relies heavily on cyberpunk themes of the advancement of technology and the substance of the human soul, as its players navigate a virtual world alongside the real one and hack both networks and souls. Unfortunately, the port received mixed reviews in the West due to its bland dungeons and dated game mechanics, although other critics praised it as reminiscent of 1990s science fiction anime.

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The other two games in the Devil Summoner series released in America, Shin Megami Tensei: Devil Summoner: Raidou Kuzunoha vs. The Soulless Army and Shin Megami Tensei: Devil Summoner: Raidou Kuzunoha vs. King Abaddon, follow a detective agency from the Taisho period in the early 1930s. The historical setting provides a distinct flavor to these games as it explores Japanese society during one of its most controversial periods. Although criticized for their weak graphics, the games are largely celebrated, by critics and fans alike, for their dark and engrossing stories and unique battle system. Both Raidou Kuzunoha games were released on the PlayStation 2, and the first game is also available on the PlayStation Network. 

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,e_sharpen:150,f_auto,fl_lossy,h_360,q_80,w_640/v1/gameskinnyc/d/e/v/devil-survivor-a9a35.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,e_sharpen:150,f_auto,fl_lossy,h_85,q_80,w_97/v1/gameskinnyc/d/e/v/devil-survivor-a9a35.jpg","type":"slide","id":"119674","description":"
Shin Megami Tensei: Devil Survivor
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Shin Megami Tensei: Devil Survivor and its sequel, Shin Megami Tensei: Devil Survivor 2 follow a group of high school students who discover the power to summon, and fight, with demons in order to defeat other demons who are trying to invade Japan and destroy the world. In the first game, our protagonists find themselves trapped in Tokyo after the government enforces a sudden quarantine. The characters must interact with others trapped in the lockdown in order to investigate the cause of the quarantine, as well as the appearance of demons in Tokyo, and try to find a way out before their "death clock" runs out and everyone trapped in the quarantine dies. In the sequel, new protagonists join a secret demon-fighting organization after surviving a demon attack. They must fight against a group of demons, hell-bent on invading and destroying the world, while also dealing with rival organizations and saving their friends from demon attacks. Both Devil Survivor games were received well by fans and critics alike for their tense story, difficult moral choices, and multiple ending paths based on character interactions and choices.

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Devil Survivor and Devil Survivor 2 are available on the Nintendo DS. Expanded editions of both games, titled Devil Survivor: Overclocked and Devil Survivor 2: Record Breaker respectively, can be played on the 3DS.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,e_sharpen:150,f_auto,fl_lossy,h_360,q_80,w_640/v1/gameskinnyc/p/e/r/persona-a0677.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,e_sharpen:150,f_auto,fl_lossy,h_85,q_80,w_97/v1/gameskinnyc/p/e/r/persona-a0677.jpg","type":"slide","id":"119675","description":"
Persona 2
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Of course, what better games to play while waiting for Persona 5 then other Persona titles. Despite the immense popularity of and 4, the first three Persona games remain unplayed by many fans. The first game in the series, Revelations: Persona, introduces the basic plot framework of the series: a group of high school students are confronted with a series of supernatural incidents in their hometown, and discover an ability to summon reflections of themselves, called "personas," in order to fight evil forces. Persona 2: Innocent Sin and its direct sequel, Persona 2: Eternal Punishment follow a similar formula with a new setting, new characters, and new dark forces to defeat. Though critics consider these first three titles enjoyable yet inferior to the later games in the series, Persona 2 is often considered the series' best game by hardcore fans. If you love Persona 3 and 4 and want to play excellent games that follow the same formula, or prefer your high school bildungsroman tales with fewer anime tropes, then give Persona and Persona 2 a try.

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All three games can be found on the PlayStation and PlayStation Portable. Additionally, Revelations: Persona is available on Microsoft Windows. 

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,e_sharpen:150,f_auto,fl_lossy,h_360,q_80,w_640/v1/gameskinnyc/s/h/i/shin-megami-tensei-2f244.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,e_sharpen:150,f_auto,fl_lossy,h_85,q_80,w_97/v1/gameskinnyc/s/h/i/shin-megami-tensei-2f244.jpg","type":"slide","id":"119671","description":"
Shin Megami Tensei IV
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With the well-received release of Shin Megami Tensei IV in the West in July 2013, the mainline series of Megami Tensei finally made it onto the radar of mainstream Western gaming. With 600,000+ sales worldwide and an average Metacritic score of 83, the game has certainly made a splash in the gaming world, albeit without nearing the heights of Persona's fame. Still, fans of the latter would do well to check out Shin Megami Tensei IV; it retains a similar battle system that also lets you recruit and fight alongside demons (shadows in Persona), a complex cast of characters, and philosophical underpinnings. Titles in the Shin Megami Tensei series are also known for being quite a bit darker than Persona, with the Japanese high school setting swapped for a post-apocalyptic, demon-ravaged Japan. As such, in both IV and other games in the series, your character is faced with tough, and at times heartbreaking, choices between friends, political factions, and belief systems, while negotiating the balance between law and order, and chaos. If you're looking for a darker, more difficult gaming experience, then Shin Megami Tensei will be right up your alley.

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Shin Megami Tensei IV can be played on the Nintendo 3DS. Shin Megami Tensei III: Nocturne, considered by many fans to be the best and deepest game in the series, was also released in the West, and can be played on the PlayStation 2. Shin Megami Tensei: Strange Journey is available on the Nintendo DS, while the first game, Shin Megami Tensei, was ported to the States on iOS in 2014.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,e_sharpen:150,f_auto,fl_lossy,h_360,q_80,w_640/v1/gameskinnyc/p/e/r/persona-c50de.png","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,e_sharpen:150,f_auto,fl_lossy,h_85,q_80,w_97/v1/gameskinnyc/p/e/r/persona-c50de.png","type":"slide","id":"119665","description":"

Are you a fan of Persona? Have you been desperately awaiting any further news (or an American/European release date) for the latest title in the beloved series? I certainly have -- and the long wait has become more and more agonizing as the Japanese release date looms closer and closer. Yet, unbeknownst to many fans, there are already many Persona-like titles on the market waiting to be played, adored, and shared with fellow fans. 

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Persona is, after all, not a standalone series -- the games are part of a much larger franchise called Megami Tensei, commonly known as Shin Megami Tensei outside of Japan. Since 1987, more than 50 games in this series have been developed and published by Atlus, though not all have been brought to the West. The following slides list Megami Tensei titles that have made their way to American consoles following the Western release of Revelations: Persona on the PlayStation in 1997. Though varied in gameplay and story, each title features a similar demon compendium and action-packed, character-driven story that is sure to entertain and engross. 

"}]]]>
Persona 5 Livestream Clocked in For May 5 https://www.gameskinny.com/ctrpz/persona-5-livestream-clocked-in-for-may-5 https://www.gameskinny.com/ctrpz/persona-5-livestream-clocked-in-for-may-5 Wed, 04 May 2016 09:34:47 -0400 Pierre Fouquet

Big Persona 5 news may be on the horizon, as it is getting a livestream on May 5 at 8:30AM EST (21:30PM JST) -- you might want to have a early night then.

Unfortunately, the live stream isn't going to be available via YouTube or Twitch.tv but via Niconico -- which you will need to sign up for to watch. Don't fret too much, as Niconico does use an English language registration page.

There isn't much information on what will be in the livestream, but here's to hoping it will be a solid release date, and more about the gameplay intricacies and characters.

Persona 5 is -- unsurprisingly -- the 5th game in the Persona series, following the story of a 16-year-old school kid transferring to the fictional school of Shujin High School in Tokyo, and is being released on the PS3 and PS4 at some point in 2016.

What do you think they will show? On a scale of heart thumping to running around your house with spirit friends, how excited are you? Let me know in the comments below.

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9 JRPGs to look forward to in 2016 https://www.gameskinny.com/sgh4a/9-jrpgs-to-look-forward-to-in-2016 https://www.gameskinny.com/sgh4a/9-jrpgs-to-look-forward-to-in-2016 Thu, 24 Mar 2016 08:59:50 -0400 Ashley Shankle

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Persona 5
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Platforms: PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4
Release date: 2016 (Summer)

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It's been how long since we've gotten a new mainline Persona game? Eight years? It's about time we finally got a new one, isn't it?

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The Shin Megami Tensei spin-off series Persona exploded with the release of Persona 3 on the PlayStation 2 and only garnered more attention and fans with the fourth entry to the series. Both the third and fourth Persona games are considered some of the best JRPG gaming on the PlayStation 2, if not ever (by some).

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Persona 5 has been added to a lot of wishlists over the years -- and it's almost time, with the game's rumored release date sitting in Summer this year. It's not far now, and with the game's overall style leaning more toward Catherine than the PS2 games and the return of Social Links, we're sure to be in for a treat on all counts.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/fl_lossy,q_80/f_auto/v1/gameskinny/4d1f7256870eea6eda65223be4187606.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/fl_lossy,q_80/f_auto/v1/gameskinny/4d1f7256870eea6eda65223be4187606.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"7791","description":"
7th Dragon III Code: VFD
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Platform: Nintendo 3DS
Release date: July 12

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A turn-based RPG with combat akin to a dungeon crawler, a base-building feature, and.. dating? Let's have at it!

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7th Dragon III Code: VFD is the first in the previously Japan-only series 7th Dragon to make it to the West, and it promises to be more expansive than its predecessors, with loads of features and some top-notch visuals for the Nintendo 3DS.

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Rumor from Japanese fans is that this is a relatively easy game -- which is great for anyone not familiar with difficult modern dungeon crawlers like Etrian Odyssey. 7th Dragon III Code: VFD looks to make up for the lack of (supposed) combat difficulty with extra features, like being able to date your party members and build a base.

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We don't get a ton of SEGA RPGs these days, and this series is popular in Japan. Hopefully this will partially quench the dungeon crawling thirst while we wait for an Etrian Odyssey 5 localization.

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Final Fantasy 15
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Platform: PlayStation 4
Release date: TBA 2016

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It's hard not to add an upcoming Final Fantasy game to this list considering the infrequency of mainline entries to the series and how iconic it is, but I'd be lying if I said I wasn't pensive about it after Square Enix has spent so many resources on Final Fantasy 13's spin-offs and trying sell us Lightning.

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But I digress: Final Fantasy 15 is coming this year and regardless of whether you're a classic or modern Final Fantasy fan, it's something to be excited about.

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Final Fantasy 15 has been in development for the gaming industry-equivalent of an eternity and as with the past few iterations to the series it's changing up the battle system and world from its predecessors. It's bound to be full-on gorgeous and massive, two adjectives JRPG fans rarely see together these days.

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Fingers crossed to 15 being the Final Fantasy we've been waiting for, and that it signals the end of (or at least lessens) Square Enix's Lightning obsession.

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Bravely Second: End Layer
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Platform: Nintendo 3DS
Release date: April 15

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Handhelds are where it's at for more traditional turn-based RPGs these days, and Bravely Default did an astounding job of bringing a new classic Final Fantasy-style experience packed with job classes, charm, and an engaging battle system to the modern market without being too derivative of Square Enix's flagship series.

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Bravely Second: End Layer promises to bring that successful mix of old and new back, and judging by some reviews from Europe's earlier release it seems to fulfill that promise. North American Nintendo 3DS owners will be able to get their hands on this baby soon enough.

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Nights of Azure
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Platform: PlayStation 4
Release date: March 29

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Nights of Azure isn't your typical Gust-developed fare. Combat is action-oriented and smooth, the world isn't bright and cheerful, and it's not 50% "cute girls doing cute things" -- but it's Gust. It's not going to be triple-A quality.

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Regardless, Nights of Azure should be on the shopping list of most action JRPG fans, with the game primarily focused on the button-mashing action. It's a Gust game, so expect lots of same-sex implications between the two female characters.

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There really isn't much else to say here, but this is definitely a candidate to fill the action JRPG void in the first half of 2016.

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Dragon Quest VII: Fragments of the Forgotten Past
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Platform: Nintendo 3DS
Release date: Summer 2016

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The Dragon Quest doesn't sell amazingly here in North America, but that doesn't mean we can't get at least some games in the series. Square Enix apparently agrees to some extent, with Dragon Quest 7 and 8 getting localized Nintendo 3DS ports this year.

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While Dragon Quest 8 is certainly a stellar game and very much worth the purchase, Dragon Quest 7 is no release to scoff at either. The game's initial North American release on the PlayStation was met with a lukewarm reception, in large part due to its two hour introduction with no action whatsoever and dated graphics for the time.

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The long, boring introduction has been cut from the port and new content added, meaning Dragon Quest 7 will finally be more accessible to the less-than-determined crowd.

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Dragon Quest 7 one of the longest games in the series and is an absolutely touching and expansive adventure. If you've never given it a shot, it's more than worth picking up once the Nintendo 3DS version releases later this year.

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NieR: Automata
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Platform: PlayStation 4
Release date: TBA 2016

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Director Taro Yoko's NieR was the definition of a modern day "sleeper hit", with much reviewer reception being lukewarm while the game itself garnered a dedicated and obsessive fanbase, and for good reason.

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NieR was and is most certainly a spin-off of Drakengard, a little-known action RPG series known more for its ability to confuse and disgust its players than delight them. NieR itself is very unique, meshing a variety of features together one really would expect with a story that's hard to forget.

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NieR: Automata's announcement last year was a massive surprise, not only because it was unexpected but because of its developer: Platinum Games.

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If you play Japanese games, you know Platinum -- the studio absolutely knocks it out of the park when it comes to action-oriented games. With Yoko Taro and Platinum working together, it's hard to imagine NieR: Automata not being everything fans could want and more.

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Tales of Berseria
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Platforms: PlayStation 4, PC
Release date: TBA 2016

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Perhaps the release most fitting to come after Star Ocean in the list is Tales of Berseria. After all, the first entries to both series were worked on by much of the same development team and both have maintained their own action battle systems through the years.

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The Tales of Berseria looks to be a more series entry to the series compared to last year's Tales of Zestria. And once again, the battle and skill systems are changing, tossing out the SC system from Zestria and even the old TP system for something called the Soul Gauge.

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A new Tales of release is always welcome, even if the series has some serious ups and downs. There's certainly something to be said of the sense of adventure the Tales of games still give today, and we're getting more of them than ever. Let's just cross our fingers that Berseria's combat isn't disappointing.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/fl_lossy,q_80/f_auto/v1/gameskinny/09a797bc48c479c6880b5338d5c38f1c.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/fl_lossy,q_80/f_auto/v1/gameskinny/09a797bc48c479c6880b5338d5c38f1c.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"7775","description":"
STAR OCEAN: Integrity and Faithlessness
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Platform: PlayStation 4
Release date: Summer 2016

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I don't think I would have bet on 2016 being the year a new Star Ocean would be released, but it's turned out to be -- over seven years after Star Ocean: The Last Hope saw its initial release on the Xbox 360.

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Integrity and Faithlessness will be the fifth mainline entry to the Star Ocean series -- and developer Tri-Ace and music composer Motoi Sakuraba are back at it again for Square Enix's sci-fi fantasy action RPG series. It just wouldn't be the same without them, right?

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Fans are hoping this fifth entry will bring Star Ocean's (sort of) glory days back, and it just very well might. The game has so far been revealed to have six simultaneous party members, a fast-paced action battle system, and the return of the Private Action, event, and item creation features fans of the series have come to expect.

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Hype for this game is so far lukewarm, which is understandable considering the polarizing opinions of the third and fourth games. Here's to hoping Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness goes above and beyond the fanbase's expectations.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/fl_lossy,q_80/c_limit,f_auto,h_360,w_640/v1/gameskinnyc/j/r/p/jrpgs-header-57781.png","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/fl_lossy,q_80/c_limit,f_auto,h_85,w_97/v1/gameskinnyc/j/r/p/jrpgs-header-57781.png","type":"slide","id":"108672","description":"

Regardless of the whispers from your circle of friends and the general gaming climate in the West, JRPGs are far from a dead sub-genre. What used to be one of the largest chunks of console gaming now makes up only a fraction of the industry's earnings, but that doesn't mean developers aren't still hammering out new titles that are worth paying attention to.

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2016 is set to be one of the larger years for Japanese-developed RPGs in recent memory, with several titles making their way West from both large and small developers. This year features a number of older series continuing to push forward and new IPs trying to make their name among one of gaming's most difficult crowds.

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All of the games we're going to feature in this list are slated for a North American release sometime this year, though some of their exact release dates are yet to be announced. Nonetheless, if you're a fan of JRPGs, you can take solace in the fact there are so many options to choose from in 2016.

"}]]]>