Pokemon Crystal Articles RSS Feed | GameSkinny.com Pokemon Crystal RSS Feed on GameSkinny.com https://www.gameskinny.com/ en Launch Media Network 8 Games and Franchises with the Biggest Translation Gaffes https://www.gameskinny.com/3ja5f/8-games-and-franchises-with-the-biggest-translation-gaffes https://www.gameskinny.com/3ja5f/8-games-and-franchises-with-the-biggest-translation-gaffes Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:30:01 -0400 Josh Broadwell

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Breath of Fire II

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Fans love to hate Capcom. Sometimes, it seems unfair. Other times, like when you remember Breath of Fire II, then it's completely understandable, and you just step back and let things go. Oh, if only the above picture had been true.

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The early BoF games had an interesting history. Squaresoft handled the first one's localization and publishing. It had some problems, sure. The dialogue and mechanics were rough around the edges but there's still enjoyment to be had with it.

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You would think of the BoF games, the first would have all the terrible issues, that Square would have taken the opportunity to sabotage a potential rival creeping in on its RPG monopoly.

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Or perhaps someone at Square could tell that left to its own devices, Capcom would do that quite nicely on its own.

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Breath of Fire II's translation and localization are full of ludicrous descriptions and sound effects and unclear dialogue. It's a showing on par with gems from the '80s like "all your base are belong to us" and Castlevania II.

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It's near Deborah Cliff...

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There are some classic signs of bad, careless translation as well, where the untranslated text is left in alongside the translated script, or even worse, the writer just added a transliteration, which isn't, y'know... actually a translation.

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Manju are Japanese buns, so this particular instance is one of those cases where you forget  where the writer forgets to delete what they chose not to use. Note the transliteration was highlighted as the key point, though.

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Other errors are less in keeping with the context. I'm not sure about you, but I see what could possibly be a boar — no bears, though.

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It's amazing how punctuation can be so significant. Some bizarre uses of periods in here, except where a period is actually needed.

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At first glance, there doesn't appear to be anything wrong with these two. It's just a nice, normal observation from a character who obviously hasn't seen Nina for a while. Except, she isn't seeing Nina now either.

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This isn't a case where the party members all fold into the leader. The girl with the wings near the table? That's Nina. This woman just told Ryu he's not a little girl anymore, and I can only imagine how surprised he must have been to learn that.

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If these things had remained a relic of the '90s BoF II, that would be a different story. But two different re-releases later — first on the Game Boy Advance and then on the Virtual Console — and Capcom still believed this translation was worth keeping.

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Modern games aren't free from the plague of bad translation, sadly, but their shortcomings certainly do provide an amusing way to pass the time. Whether it's Capcom's carelessness in the '90s, Atlus's rushed schedule from a few years back, or the flood of cheap titles inundating digital platforms, it seems like bad translations are simply a universal factor of gaming life.

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Got any examples of terrible game translations? Share yours in the comments!

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Persona 5

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Including Persona 5 on this list might be controversial. However, there's no denying that good though the game undoubtedly is, it falls far short of Atlus's standards in localization and what fans have come to expect from the company. That departure from the high-quality norm is a bigger gaffe than any translation awkwardness in the game.

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Fortunately, for the most part, the game's dialogue quirks don't come anywhere near Kitty Love and Hollow Fragment levels of bad. You do have to pause for a moment and consider what's being said from time to time, though.

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Morgana is pretty quirky to begin with, so at first glance, this seems like just another manifestation of that personality. But the sentence doesn't technically make sense. "seriously trying to kill us" maybe or "serious about killing us," but serious to kill us is what you'd expect from an inexperienced translator or an early ESL student.

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Conner Kramer put together a site listing some notably egregious errors (and getting some flak for it from the fan community as well), and he added some alternatives for a few of them. Here's an example:

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His revision is a lot more like what fans got in Persona 4 and much more in keeping with the character doing the speaking as well. One would expect a high school principle to say something like "misdemeanor is not tolerated..." as opposed to "you will behave yourself," which is better suited to an elementary school setting.

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There are other signs of carelessness too.

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Image via j-entranslations

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Persona games rely heavily on good dialogue to push the story forward and keep players interested. These issues are hardly game breaking, but they do break the immersion, which makes it difficult to remain invested.

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What lies behind the issue is a mystery. It's possible some elements of localization were a rushed job, since the game was delayed to begin with. But it's equally possible it was simply oversight.

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Yu Namba, senior project manager at Atlus and responsible for a good deal of Persona games' localization processes, once said he couldn't account for everything that happened, but tried to make sure the core narrative was coherent and clear. Other things could slip through the cracks, as they apparently did for P5.

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Kitty Love

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The Switch has taken over the Vita's place as supreme host of otome games. The eShop is flooded with romance games, most of which are geared towards female audiences, and many of which have rather low production values.

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Kitty Love takes the crown for one of the worst translations, though. It's the usual quirky premise for one of these games. The protagonist works at a flower shop by day and turns into a cat by night, because why not.

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As is a growing trend with eShop games, the game's end result is less than stellar, with apparently very little in the way of quality control either by the developer or Nintendo's alleged curation process.

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The quintessential tourist activity — buttering the day

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Some of the errors here aren't quite Hollow Fragment bad, but they do range from the mild to the completely unintelligible, up to the "how could you think this was okay?"

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The protagonist is in cat form in the above, so presumably, this is just a special way of saying he held the cat

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Many of the scenarios just take a bit of figuring out to understand.

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That isn't one of them, though.

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Or that one.

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Okay, so maybe it is on par with Hollow Fragment.

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That's...not good.

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Slapdash niche games riddled with errors aren't exactly new, but there are a couple of things that make Kitty Love stand out as particularly noteworthy.

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The first is the fact that it exists at all on the Switch eShop. Nintendo claimed from the eShop's early days that it would be akin to a curated platform, and not every pitch, even from well-known developers, would be accepted. Fast forward two short years, and it seems that policy has quietly been abandoned.

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What's more, unlike some games, including Hollow Fragment, Kitty Love continues to exist in this form — no patches, no changes, no discounts. Whether the amusing dialogue is worth the price of admission is for you to decide.

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Pokemon Crystal: Vietnamese Version

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Pokemon Vietnamese Crystal has been a thing on the internet for many years, and it's practically a meme generator. The game has a strange history. It started as a Chinese translation of the Japanese script, but despite being considered a Vietnamese version, the game is pretty much entirely in English.

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Players are greeted with this.

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They do? I'm...so sorry

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For some reason, the translator was a bit free with referring to Pokemon as Elf and as Monster, depending on the context, though there didn't seem to be much of a guiding reason behind which scenario got which reference. Either way, there's not much of a link between professor or scholar and monster.

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Some of the text is comprehensible, and you can get an idea of how it went from the original meaning to the slightly garbled one.

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Friend makes sense, since Pokemon are often referred to as friend in the script. Store... eh. Center and shop are close, but that's starting to stretch it (especially when everything in there is free).

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And then you get ones like this, from the next script point.

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It's easy to pick up on the fact that "grasp" is used for catch, but basin?

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This early conversation shortly after the rival makes an appearance is unique, but not actually instructive.

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This one doesn't seem to be very clear either, until you realize he's talking about Mr. Pokemon.

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Apart from the phrasing, it makes sense. I don't know what the original script says, but I imagine it's something referring to Mr. Pokemon as an older man, hence "Grandfather."

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But then you get this again.

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And this.

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The battle system is its own set of special. The theory goes that perhaps there was an indexing error that threw descriptions and translations off, since some are correct, just out of place. Other issues involved transliterating Japanese grammatical particles that weren't intended to be spoken or read.

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But it doesn't explain everything about it or the naming conventions.

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It certainly doesn't explain the unique way of obtaining items, where the game throws the F-bomb your way every time you place an item in the bag.

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Most of the game is almost impossible to understand. If you're interested, you can check out the original Let's Play that sparked the phenomenon. 

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Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment

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Sword Art Online is a popular transmedia franchise, spanning manga, anime, and video games. In most cases, SOA in all of its forms tells a compelling story with likeable characters, and it's garnered a decent-sized following in the West. We even ranked Sword Art Online: Hollow Realization as one of 2017's best anime franchise games.

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Its sequel, Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment had a very, very rough start in the West, though. Like a handful of other Japanese games released in Asia before the West, it initially had an Asian release with an English language option.

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But that translation was bad. In fact, bad doesn't even begin to cover it.

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Japan has its share of race problems, but this wasn't an instance of blatant insensitivity. This is just referring to Kirito, the man wearing black. Though, I don't think he was sexually harassing anyone.

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This isn't exactly what you'd expect to find as a subject line in a hero's inbox.  Fear not, though — it's just monster extermination, SAO Asian translation-style.

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The translation was also just plain lazy. SAO games stray into racy territory now and again, but , this isn't a reference to one of those adult visual novel scenes. This is just bad translation of a symbol with a wide variety of meanings, most of which relate to war, exploration, and things like that.

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Fans who played the version that existed prior to the improved translation patch saw lots of references to penetration throughout the game, in some unusual contexts as well.

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Some of the (many) instances do make me wonder whether the translator had a slight idea of what they were saying and tried to just make a joke out of it.

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This wasn't the only instance of single-minded determination to stick to one translation regardless of context either.

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A standard Japanese greeting is yoroshiku, or the full version, yoroshiku onegaishimasu. It can mean a variety of things, from "nice to meet you," to "let's get along" or "let's work together," among other potential definitions.

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It's useful when you first meet someone, of course. But Asuna and other characters  would say this every time Kirito chose them to accompany him on a penetration — er, that is, an exploration trip.

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Same to you!

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There are countless other instances of unclear or ridiculous phrasing as well.

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This being one good example.

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As a matter of fact, there is.

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Bandai Namco isn't known for always making the best decisions, but it's odd how an established company ended up using a very evidently poorly trained translator for the original English version.

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One of my favorite things about being underground is seeing the sky.

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The Tales of... Games

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Bandai Namco's Tales of... series is known for its endearing characters, interesting plots, and snappy dialogue. However, not all entries are created equally.

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The most recent new Tales of game, Tales of Berseria, was lauded for its darker take on the usually chipper stories and characters, but it suffered from some very uneven dialogue and writing towards the end of the game

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Not all the errors are quite as confusing as this one, though.

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But the biggest issue with the numerous gaffes towards the end of the game is that most of them end up completely unintelligible, like these next two.

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Bandit shrooms don't even exist in the game.

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It's worth noting the voiced lines don't always match with the written dialogue, though. This fact leads some to suspect that perhaps what happened with Berseria was a sudden change in script or direction near the end of production that didn't make it to the localization department and was just crammed in at the last minute.

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Errors in Earlier Games
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Either way, these kinds of issues aren't restricted to modern titles. Clyde Mandellin with Legends of Localization noticed this interesting mistake in Tales of the Abyss that's rather easy to overlook.

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In between all the talk of fonons and fomicry in the early part of the game, it's easy to forget that the seventh fonon was known about for a long, long time. After all, how could Tear be a practicing Seventh Fonist if it was only just discovered?

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The error here comes from a loose translation of the original Japanese, which only said it was the most recently discovered, which doesn't give any kind of time reference.

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Then there was the official English translation of Tales of Phantasia, with this interesting little nugget.

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The original line was Ragnarok, but Mandelin says older versions of Microsoft Word didn't include Ragnarok in the dictionary and only offered Kangaroo with a capital K as the first recommended choice. This one was a careless spell check error that somehow managed to make it through to publication.

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Why the editors of a fantasy game script thought spell check could be relied on anyway is another matter.

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Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana

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The Ys series is one of gaming's longest-running series, with Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana being the most recent entry. While its action oriented gameplay and immersive worlds haven't changed dramatically over the decades, its publication status in the West certainly has.

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Most of the early titles after the original two ended up as fan translations, before XSeed began bringing them over as part of its partnership with developer Nihon Falcom (we won't talk about that Konami incident with Ys VI).

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And then came Nippon Ichi Software America. As part of Falcom's attempts to expand its international audience, it gave the publishing license for Ys VIII to NISA, with some initially unforeseen results.

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This character's bowel habits became a running gag in the original translation, which shouldn't be too surprising since NISA also gave us Esty Dee (STD) as a localization joke (as they did in Atelier Rorona: The Alchemist of Arland).

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It's okay Reja; most of us don't either.

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The game was riddled with untranslated text, randomly scattered here and there — a common error in badly handled games from the '90s, but not something one would expect from modern games. It's certainly not in keeping with what fans expected, which made it stand out all the more.

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Lines like this are common as well, making certain narrative segments and even dialogue a sort of guessing game. But that's not the worst thing.

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The game originally had a passable English translation, especially for most main segments and place names. Why NISA  re-translated isn't clear, particularly when the re-translation was as it was.

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Fortunately, NISA publicly recognized its errors and re-re-translated the script, providing a much better experience all 'round and apparently earning Falcom's trust enough to warrant being given its next big overseas project, The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel III

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Final Fantasy Games

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Most Final Fantasy games are high quality, well-produced works. That doesn't mean they are error-free, but for the most part, the base games are well-written with good localization.

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Unfortunately, Square Enix has gained a reputation for not really caring about how those high quality works transfer to other platforms based on their lazy ports and similarly low-effort localizations.

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No, the above isn't a screenshot from an alternate Final Fantasy IV universe where the Red Wings were Baron's premiere delivery service with Cecil as their leader. It's the first line of script in the mobile FFIV port.

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The port was supposed to use the DS version's script, but obviously, something happened along the way. It made its own mistakes, while keeping those of its predecessor.

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And then there's the mobile port of Final Fantasy VI.

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Given how many times "esper" appears in the script, it's baffling how this mistake wasn't caught before the game launched, to say nothing of the awkward phrasing that was left untouched.

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Still, the script is entirely readable, unlike some other inclusions in this list. The biggest issue is that errors like this are expected with most SE ports, causing one to wonder about the overall attitude of the port teams and the company towards its franchises.

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Errors in Original Versions
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However, the original versions are certainly not free from errors.

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Final Fantasy VII fans will already know this screenshot contains two errors The potentially less obvious one is Aeris's name. It's actually meant to be Aerith, and that's how it appears in all later mentions in the Final Fantasy universe.

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This was a common translation error in the 1990s, when localization teams were apparently not experienced in differentiating between easily misunderstood Japanese characters. Most people know about the "L" and "R" confusion, but "S" and "TH" is another one.

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There are, of course, other linguistic challenges to overcome as well.

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That above is a wyvern in Final Fantasy V.

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There's not really any reason other than just "whoops" for this one from Final Fantasy X, though to be fair, it was fixed in the HD remasters.

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Video game fans have been dealing with the highs and lows of translation and localization since the 1980s. It's a risk built into a hobby that often relies on media translated from one context-sensitive language to a very different one.

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Some of the early examples of translation gaffes have made their way into meme-dom and are among the best-known examples of games gone wrong, games such as Top Wing and Ghosts N' Goblins.

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As time progressed, one would think these issues would gradually fade away, with more experienced translators and bigger budgets.

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That, however, didn't happen. Through the 1990s and up to recent years, video games still dealt shoddy translations, rushed schedules, and bad management — even some of the bigger games and studios.

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Some of the more egregious errors in these games and franchises are what this list focuses on, examples of games that should have been better from companies that ought to know better. Along the way, we'll touch on the reasons behind the gaffes and explore what, if anything, was done to remedy the problems.

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Pokemon Crystal Will Be Available on 3DS Next Year https://www.gameskinny.com/fcwmv/pokemon-crystal-will-be-available-on-3ds-next-year https://www.gameskinny.com/fcwmv/pokemon-crystal-will-be-available-on-3ds-next-year Sun, 17 Dec 2017 11:29:53 -0500 Lee Forgione

Like every version preceding it, Pokemon Crystal Version will soon be available to purchase on the Nintendo 3DS eShop. 

Nintendo announced that Crystal Version will be coming to 3DS on January 26, 2017, and will be priced at $9.99. Additional features will be added to the game as well. 

Specifically, Crystal will be compatible with the Pokemon Bank, allowing players to carry over whatever they catch into the newer titles such as Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon. It will also allow for cross battle and trading with older versions, like Red, Blue, and Yellow, through a feature called Time Capsule.

Upon completing the game, players will have a chance to capture Celebi through an in-game event. This is in contrast to the original Pokemon Crystal, which required a special accessory called the Game Shark to cheat your way to obtaining this rare Pokemon. 

Nintendo also states that with the release of Pokemon Crystal, it will now be possible to carry Pokemon from all 29 core games in the series over to Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon.

 

 

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Why Does Game Freak Keep Making Mid-Gen Expansions? https://www.gameskinny.com/qbns3/why-does-game-freak-keep-making-mid-gen-expansions https://www.gameskinny.com/qbns3/why-does-game-freak-keep-making-mid-gen-expansions Fri, 17 Nov 2017 15:14:41 -0500 Josh Broadwell

Pokemon is one of the most recognizable franchises in gaming and pop culture. The series rocketed to fame almost instantly upon release in Japan and in the West, taking developers and consumers by surprise, and it's still going strong 20 years later. With all that success, one might be forgiven for thinking that Game Freak is tempted to abuse the franchise, and many often point to the mid-gen expansions like Pokemon Crystal and Pokemon Platinum as proof of that. These expansions don't always offer drastic changes to the formula, it's true. However, they serve several important purposes, from being a testing ground for developers to giving fans what they want, while offering the definitive version of that generation for newcomers as well.

In the Beginning...

The first three generations saw expansions that didn't add much in the way of content, but provided just enough to help encourage players to dip back into the franchise.

Of all the expansions, Pokemon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition is the easiest one to point at and say "cash grab." Its main purpose for existing was for the developers to tie the game franchise more closely with the anime series that was blossoming nicely at the time. Your first Pokemon had to be Pikachu, Jessie and James (and Meowth) took the place of a few key Team Rocket battles, and you could obtain all three starters over the course of the game. Otherwise, apart from being colorized, there wasn't much difference between it and its predecessors.

But Game Freak made it difficult to easily pass off the game by making it so good. It was the perfect way to capture new fans who had seen the show but not played the games, and the fanservice was moderate enough to keep from harming the overall package and just enough to make it worthwhile. The challenge of having to use Pikachu required players to develop new strategies, and it introduced an important mechanic that still plays a role in the series as well, the friendship mechanic. Despite not offering a whole lot of new content, Yellow is almost always at the top of the 3DS eShop sales list.

Pokemon Crystal was a bit more conservative, though it did introduce battle animations for sprites and the option to choose gender. It experimented with story additions and laid the foundations for the Battle Frontier later too. There wasn't quite as much to justify returning to Johto, yet fans hold it in high regard as the definitive Gen II experience. Like Yellow, it offers just enough to entice owners of the original two and makes for an even smoother entry for newcomers, even if it's a bit sparing as far as expansions go.

Changes Afoot

Pokemon Emerald was the true gem of the first three expansions, though. It was the first to add significant changes to the story and tweak the gameworld enough to make returning interesting, switching around some key character roles and adding a wealth of new features, including the fan-favorite Battle Frontier. The story changes were the most significant, though, combining the plots from Ruby and Sapphire and giving you an actual reason to catch all three of Hoenn's legendary Pokemon, while refining the overall experience.

Despite being widely criticized for not radically changing the series, these seemingly minor alterations fit in with the studio's vision for the series. For example, the developers wanted to add more unique challenges, but the Frontier was deemed too difficult for Ruby and Sapphire, so it was left out. Like the others, the level of investment on the player's part depends entirely on how much they enjoyed the originals, but also like the others, most fans consider Emerald the pinnacle of its generation.

Expanding the Expansions

From the 4th generation onward, the series brought with it a wide variety of changes as it gained a more secure footing in the industry. The expansions were no different, as Game Freak added a number of changes to entice players back for more.

Generation IV's expansion brought with it more significant changes. Pokemon Platinum followed Emerald's footsteps and revamped the story, giving both legendary Pokemon new roles and making them central to the plot. It wasn't a gripping plot like you'd expect from a Final Fantasy game, of course, but it went a long way in creating a more coherent world and giving concrete motivations to the villains therein. Here is where Game Freak started using expansions to fit their overall goals for the series as well. They improved and expanded the role of Wi-Fi, which served the dual purpose of making the games perfect for the competitive scene and making it easier for people to connect over their shared interest in the series.

Sinnoh itself was changed a fair bit, more so than in previous expansions, with aesthetic changes throughout, redesigned gyms and updated gym rosters, and, even more importantly, a streamlined battle system. Gone was the lag between actions and their effects from Diamond and Pearl, with everything functioning much more smoothly overall. The Battle Frontier was greatly expanded too, providing even more incentive to play after finishing the main campaign, along with the ability to face off against major figures again in tournaments. Little wonder, then, that Generation IV was the best-selling generation in the series.

New Territory

The series stumbled a bit with Generation V. Black and White divided some with its too-linear progression through Unova, unique design choices, and stilted storyline (ethics are good, but a series where you imprison innocent creatures and force them to fight isn't really the best platform for an ethical message). Black 2 and White 2 aimed to fix those issues and add even more. Game Freak's chief goal with these was twofold: to defy players' expectations by not making a Grey version and to expand the world of Unova in ways they didn't have a chance to for the previous entries, hence the choice for a direct sequel. Junichi Masuda, the games' director, said he wanted to create a world that had changed in the two years since the original games to help give players a sense of that progression and make it seem new again.

Unova received a completely new makeover, and the way players moved about it changed a good bit as well, along with alterations to gym rosters and the ability to create a varied lineup early on in the story. The story received a good bit of flak for returning to the old gangsters-versus-child line but managed to still add something unique to the plot with the divisions in Team Plasma. One of the biggest changes Masuda was excited about was Pokewood, since it gave players an opportunity to engage in something similar to a puzzle challenge the more they progressed with their films. None of it was the huge shakeup of the franchise many called for, but the developers listened to their fans and gave them what they wanted.

The Red-Headed Stepchild

Then there was Generation VI with Pokemon X and Pokemon Y. Both received high praise in reviews and disappeared from shelves much faster than other installments for a variety of reasons, not least of which was the jump to full 3D models. They built on some of what made the Black and White sequels successful, but a cursory look through fan communities is enough to tell you that people wanted more. "Kalos was underdeveloped, the plot needed more to it, and the constant presence of the player's posse stole the thrill of adventure and exploration" is how the most common complaints usually go.

And it's true. For such a major milestone in the series in terms of presentation, the gameworld, and the sheer number of available Pokemon, there should have been follow-ups to help tie it all together in a definitive package. For example, as goofy as Team Flare is, and Y took the series' storytelling in a more serious direction. There's plenty of material for an expansion or alternate timeline to help make that story more potent. As intrusive as Shauna and the gang could be, expansions would have provided the chance to give them more of a real place in the game, either through battles or significance to the plot. But fans wanted remakes of Ruby and Sapphire. So that's what they got, with some minor tie-ins to X and Y, leaving Kalos a slightly odd, lonely addition to the Pokemon world.

Critical Reception

Critical reception of these expansions tends to be mixed. They always receive high scores, with the exception of a couple here and there for the Black and White sequels, but the primary complaint remains the same: there isn't anything new to make playing them worthwhile. Some argue that the expansions come too soon on the heels of the originals, as with Black 2 and White 2, not giving players enough time to really want to come back. Even those that rate highly will sometimes deride the expansions for not really adding anything drastic to the overall experience.

But these criticisms miss a few important points. After Gold and Silver, it was widely believed that the "Pokemon fad" was dead, making the development of Ruby and Sapphire a very stressful experience. Preserving what made the series successful to begin with became very important, to keep from alienating fans and creating a sharp divide between those who played older Pokemon games and newcomers. (And given what happened with what I call the Sonic Effect, where Sega strayed from the series' foundations with each new entry, that surely wasn't a bad decision.)

Game Freak used expansions as a way to add in extra ideas that might not have gone over well for the base installments -- either by adding too much content or straying from the core experience -- and it's a way for Game Freak to train newer members of the development team while veteran developers work on projects with higher stakes attached. Most importantly, though, it's a bit unfair to judge expansions for not radically altering the franchise when that isn't their goal to begin with. It's like complaining that vanilla ice cream isn't chocolate when it never tried to be anyway.

The New Kids on the Block

Fast forward to 2017, and there's another set of proper expansions contending for players' time and money: Pokemon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon. After the major changes that were the original Sun and Moon, these seem set to be more in line with Black 2 and White 2, providing some alterations in world structure, different Pokemon, and a much meatier plot. Many fans complained about how restricted Alola seemed, and like with Kalos, it's not hard to see why.

Sun and Moon made big promises with story and the world itself, and despite the finished products being worthwhile themselves, they leave the player wanting more -- more to do with these new Pokemon, more to see and explore other than just another quest to catch some additional legendary Pokemon. Many of these complaints addressed problems Game Freak believed existed anyway but just didn't have the time to address.

Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon are set to provide fans everything they wanted, but most think it's too much, too soon. Fan communities are echoing the critics of yesteryear and saying there isn't enough to justify purchasing new games only a year after Sun and Moon released. In all fairness, The Pokemon Company hasn't done much to help market the games either. Sun and Moon were almost over-marketed, being featured at the 2016 E3 show and with countless little info drops that practically spoiled the games anyway. It's a shame, really. The new entries are set to strike a perfect balance between the major changes of Sun and Moon and the more conservative alterations of the previous expansions, with a heaping helping of new content on top.

The Verdict

Even though they don't always add loads of new content, there's more than enough to draw fans back in, and the fact that the expansions are always as well made as the originals makes them worthy as standalone entries anyway. Yet it's easier for those who miss a generation to value the mid-gen expansions, since money isn't as much of a question and almost everyone recommends Emerald or Black 2 over their respective predecessors. In the end, however useful and practical they are, it's down to the individual consumer to make the choice.

What do you think about Game Freak's mid-gen expansions? Love 'em? Hate 'em? Let us know in the comments.

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8 Pokemon That Look Kind of Edible https://www.gameskinny.com/a37d4/8-pokemon-that-look-kind-of-edible https://www.gameskinny.com/a37d4/8-pokemon-that-look-kind-of-edible Sun, 04 Dec 2016 17:29:34 -0500 Unclepulky

Unless you're a competitive player, your opinion on whether or not you like a pokemon most likely comes down to what you think of its design. While some pokemon look cool or are absolutely adorable, others are panned for ugly or unoriginal designs.

However, something most people likely don't think of when rating a Pokemon is: "How edible does this pokemon look?"

Pokemon may be our friends, but sometimes, they really do look tasty. For one reason or another, we just really want to eat them. So here we'll be looking at eight of the most edible looking pokemon. And, for the sake of simplicity, these will be ordered by Pokedex number.

#079.Slowpoke- The Dopey Pokemon

 

The sole representative of Gen 1 on this list, Slowpoke is one of the few Pokemon we actually know to be tasty.

In Pokemon Gold, Silver and Crystal, a major part of the game is stopping the newly revamped Team Rocket from cutting off the tails of Slowpokes. And the reason they're doing this isn't because they're sadists, but because the rarity and deliciousness of slowpoke tails fetch a high price. 

Five generations later, Game Freak has given us even more information about this delicacy. Here is Slowpoke's entry in the Pokemon Moon Pokedex: "Alolan home cooking involves drying slowpoke tails and then simmering them into a salty stew."

#420. Cherubi: The Cherry Pokemon

Despite the fact that they've existed since the first Pokemon games, some players seem to hate the fact that the newer games also include Pokemon based on real world objects.

However, this Gen 4 Pokemon is a cherry. And cherries are delicious. Thus, your argument is invalid.

As for its Pokedex entries, I am not exaggerating at all when I say that literally all of them either bring up how it's tasty, how it's filled with nutrients or both. Considering real cherries are basically just small, red balls of sugar, then the fact that this Pokemon is both delicious and nutritious makes it more appealing than the real fruit.

#493. Arceus: The Alpha Pokemon

 

Yes, I want to eat God.

Blasphemy, I know, but hear me out. First, Arceus is based on a goat. I'm not sure if you've ever had goat meat, but when prepared well, it can work well in a lot of dishes, especially gyros.

I sadly don't have any Pokedex entries talking about how tasty this Pokemon is, but what I do have is an old idiom: "You are what you eat."

That's right. I want to eat God so I can gain his power and use it for the most important purpose of all. I will make a miracle happen: I WILL FORCE GAME FREAK TO MAKE AN OFFICIAL POKEMON MMO!                                     

#550. Basculin: The Hostile Pokemon 
 

In real life, bass, the fish Basculin is obviously based on, don't have much flavor on their own -- but they can be seasoned to great effect.

Other than the possibility of making a good meal out of it, part of the reason Basculin appears on this list is because it's one of the few Pokemon I genuinely don't like. As such, I'd have little to no trouble chopping off its head and then removing its bones and cleaning it.

For the two of you out there who call Basculin your favorite Pokemon, I apologize for that mental image.

Oh, and once again, I have my lovely friend the Pokedex to turn to. Several entries, including the ones from Black and White 2, Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire refer to Basculin as "Remarkably Tasty."

#580. Ducklett: The Water Bird Pokemon

Now, I could have easily included Psyduck on this list, but I like that little guy too much to ever eat him. So sorry Ducklett, nothing against you, but that leaves you as my main ingredient for roast duck with oyster dressing.

Honestly, my taste for duck is really all that places Ducklett here. Its Pokedex entry doesn't make it out to be tasty, I have nothing against it personally and eating it wouldn't give me God like power. 

I just...really like duck.

Sorry, Bro.

 #584. Vanilluxe: The Snowstorm Pokemon

Completely unintentionally, this list ended up comprised of 50% Gen 5 Pokemon and 50% Pokemon from other generations. As such, Vanilluxe isn't even the last Gen 5 Pokemon to appear on this list. 

It is, however, perhaps the Pokemon I want to eat the most. 

Vanilluxe is a Pokemon a lot of people point to as an example of "how stupid" modern Pokemon designs are, but, while it's not one of my favorites, I'm rather fond of it. 

You may think the reason I want to eat it so much is because it's based on an ice cream cone -- but that's not it at all. In fact, the reason I want to eat Vanilluxe is because it's based off a dessert very similar to an ice cream cone: The 99 Flake, which is basically a vanilla ice cream cone with a Cadbury flake inside.

Tis very delectable.

#604. Elektross: The EleFish                                                                

 

Though unappealing to some based purely on the idea of eating it, when used correctly, eel can be used to make some spectacular food. And, since Elektross is the closest thing we have to an eel in the world of Pokemon, it warrants a spot on the list.

Like with Ducklett, I don't have much else to go on besides the real life animal is resembles. As such, I'll just round out this Elektross entry with a real life recommendation for those who've never eaten eel.

The dish I speak of is Unadon. Literally translating to English as "Eel Bowl," Unadon consists of a large bowl of steamed white rice topped with strips of grilled eel. 

It's nothing fancy, but I believe it to be a good introduction to the ingredient.

#684. Swirlix: The Cotton Candy Pokemon

 

 

Closing out the list, we have one of the cutest and silliest Pokemon to hail from the Kalos Region.

Personally, I find cotton candy just a bit disgusting, but there's no denying that this thing is straight up cotton candy with eyeballs. I've even seen little kids playing Pokemon X and Y on a train asking their parents if Swirlix tasted like real cotton candy.

And now, one last time, lets look at the place where dreams go to die: The Pokedex.

So far, all of Swirlix's entries have described it as being sweet and sticky. I guarantee you. If Swirlix was real, and you put one in front of a toddler, that Swirlix wouldn't survive for a minute.

So there you have it, eight pokemon that we'd love to get a little taste of. And can you blame us? They all look so darn delectable!

Which Pokemon do you think looks the most edible? Are there any Pokemon from Alola you feel deserve a spot on this list? Let us know in the Comments! 

 

 

 

 

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Top 5 Saddest Pokedex Entries https://www.gameskinny.com/avtl1/top-5-saddest-pokedex-entries https://www.gameskinny.com/avtl1/top-5-saddest-pokedex-entries Sat, 20 Aug 2016 10:37:21 -0400 Alex Anderson_0905

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Cubone

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“Wears the skull of its deceased mother. Its cries echo inside the skull and come out as a sad melody.” – Pokemon Yellow

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“It pines for the mother it will never see again. Seeing a likeness of its mother in the full moon, it cries. The stains on the skull it wears are from its tears.” – Pokemon Emerald

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You’ll be hard pressed to find a first generation Pokemon fan that doesn’t know about Cubone’s backstory. Aptly called the Lonely Pokemon, Cubone is known for wearing its dead mother’s skull to hide its face and staining it with its tears. Its mother died when it was young and it howls at the moon at night because it misses her. According to Bulbapedia, its original name in the Pokemon Red and Blue beta was going to be Ophon, a play on the word orphan.

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If you look for them, you can find some pretty interesting Pokedex entries. Some are sad, some are happy, and some are just straight up disturbing. Go look for more Pokedex entries for yourself because they’re tons out there to enjoy!

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Banette

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“An abandoned plush doll became this Pokémon. They are said to live in garbage dumps and wander about in search of the children that threw them away.” – Pokemon Emerald

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“A cursed energy permeated the stuffing of a discarded and forgotten plush doll, giving it new life as Banette. The Pokémon's energy would escape if it were to ever open its mouth.” – Pokemon Sapphire

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How many toys do you remember throwing away as a kid? Because some of them probably remember you throwing them away. Banette’s Pokedex entry is pretty sad, especially when coupled with the fact that you can find this Pokemon in garbage cans in the game and it’s mentioned in some entries that if it opens its mouth, it’s energy will escape, effectively killing it. But, there’s a different twist to this Pokemon’s entry because it seeks revenge on the children that threw it away.

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Spoink

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“Spoinkbounces around on its tail. The shock of its bouncing makes its heart pump. As a result, this Pokémon cannot afford to stop bouncing - if it stops, its heart will stop.” – Pokemon Ruby

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Spoink is another cute Pokemon with a sad Pokedex entry. While the Pokemon Sapphire entry is a lot more tame, commenting on Spoink’s quest to find a bigger pearl, the Pokemon Ruby entry tells us that if it stops bouncing, this cute little pig will die. It almost makes you forget its evolved form Grumpig uses its psychic powers to control its foe's minds.

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Yamask

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“Each of them carries a mask that used to be its face when it was human. Sometimes they look at it and cry.” – Pokemon Black

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Yamask is a cute little Ghost-type, that carries around its own face. Not only is this entry sad because Yamask cries over its face and the memories it holds, but it also reminds us that Ghost-type Pokemon used to be alive and they’re stuck fighting for their trainers while dealing with their own confusing existence.

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Parasect

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“A host-parasite pair in which the parasite mushroom has taken over the host bug. Prefers damp places.” – Pokemon Red/Blue

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“When nothing's left to extract from the bug, the mushrooms on its back leave spores on the bug's egg.” – Pokemon Crystal

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Parasect, the evolved form of Paras, has a dead look in its eyes. That’s because it’s actually dead. In almost all of Parasect’s Pokedex entries the game mentions it scattering spores around the forest. This is normal since it has a huge mushroom on its back, but in Pokemon Red and Blue, and later in Crystal, the entries allude to the mushroom being a parasite that has completely taken over the host bug.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,e_sharpen:150,f_auto,fl_lossy,h_360,q_80,w_640/v1/gameskinnyc/1/9/6/1960894-xzc-72696.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,e_sharpen:150,f_auto,fl_lossy,h_85,q_80,w_97/v1/gameskinnyc/1/9/6/1960894-xzc-72696.jpg","type":"slide","id":"130768","description":"

If you’ve been playing Pokemon for while, you’re probably no stranger to Pokedex entries. They give players more information about the lure of the world and how Pokemon interact with it. Pokedex entries are a great way of worldbuilding in the Pokemon games, but they can get really sad, really fast. Here is a list of the top 5 saddest Pokedex entries.

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Watch this player beat Pokemon Trainer Red with a level 5 team! https://www.gameskinny.com/23yqo/watch-this-player-beat-pokemon-trainer-red-with-a-level-5-team https://www.gameskinny.com/23yqo/watch-this-player-beat-pokemon-trainer-red-with-a-level-5-team Wed, 08 Jun 2016 08:37:59 -0400 David Fisher

In the second generation of Pokemon games, Pokemon Trainer Red was the ultimate battle. Not only did Red have the most balanced team in the entire game in terms of type advantages, his Pokemon ranged from level 73 to level 81. He was the champion of all champions, and in the endgame of Pokemon Gold, Silver, and Crystal he was the greatest single-player challenge in the game.

While most players come to face Red with a team upwards of level 80, YouTube user DemonicWarden had other plans. Equipped with a 6 member team consisting of nothing but level 5 Pokemon, DemonicWarden shows us how even the weakest Pokemon can take down the world's greatest Pokemon trainer!

The player's team which consists of Cubone, Gastly, Miltank, Mr. Mime, Rattata, and Scyther may not seem like much. However, there is method to the madness.

How DemonicWarden wins the battle is actually quite interesting. In early Pokemon games - and arguably still to this day - the AI always aims to do the most damage in the least moves. This means that type advantages will always be used first. By switching out to Pokemon that aren't affected by the opponent's moves, DemonicWarden manages to avoid Red's attacks until he quite literally orders his Pokemon to their own demise.

This is of course mixed in with various other ways of burning Red's Pokemon's power points and health, but the end result is the same: victory.

It's a neat trick, but I think I'll stick to building a stronger team.

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15 Pokemon rock and metal covers you need to listen to https://www.gameskinny.com/stpgn/15-pokemon-rock-and-metal-covers-you-need-to-listen-to https://www.gameskinny.com/stpgn/15-pokemon-rock-and-metal-covers-you-need-to-listen-to Wed, 17 Jun 2015 02:30:02 -0400 SwordandSorcery

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When not delving into the world of remixes or orchestrations, it can be pretty hard to find cover versions of Junichi Masuda's work that are not metal or rock based. That does not, however, mean they are undeserving of praise or attention. These artists add something new to the music already in existence with their covers.

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So take a moment to appreciate not only these covers, but also other Pokémon music covers out there. You will not regret it.

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Pokémon X/Y Guitar Medley by FamilyJules7X

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I got to a point where I could only pick 1 song covered by this artist, FamilyJules7X. The choice was difficult so I picked the one that packed the most into one medley. This medley includes a number of different cities from Pokémon X and Y, Lysandre's theme, and the theme from the Pokéball factory, and a few others I will leave as a surprise (or you could just follow the link to the YouTube page and look there).

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The themes in this medley are very, very different in some ways but somehow FamilyJules7X has made them fit together excellently.

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FamilyJules7X is an American musician who makes video game music covers and has written an album specifically for Crypt of the Necrodancer called Aria's Ascent.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/f61d0dcb2dc80133257221e67016c17e.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/f61d0dcb2dc80133257221e67016c17e.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"6105","description":"

Pokemon B/W (Rock Remix) - Nimbasa City by Shady Cicada

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From what I recall of Nimbasa city in Pokémon Black and White versions, it is a pretty large place, with a few sports stadiums, the Musical Theater, a Ferris wheel, and a gym. Nimbasa is not as large or intimidating as Castelia city, of course. But I always enjoyed the generally upbeat theme. This cover is certainly less so but anyone who liked music that played in Nimbasa will probably like this version as well.

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Shady Cicada is a composer who covers and remixes already existing music as well as writes his own, incorporating many different genres into his work.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/5eb97644ca0333769b77b223f513787f.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/5eb97644ca0333769b77b223f513787f.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"6107","description":"

Pokémon X&Y Bicycle Theme Metal Cover by Arathrum

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For those of you who breed Pokémon (as the artist, Arathrum, noted), you will probably know this song all too well and perhaps even be sick of listening to it because you have spent hours of your time riding back and forth in front of the day care center, waiting for your Pokémon to lay that 6 IV egg. Even if you are tired of it, give this version a spin. Though Arathrum tries to stay as close to the original as possible, the guitars give it a different feel.

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Arathrum does mostly metal video game covers, and from time to time his own compositions. He is from The Netherlands.

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Pokemon Omega Ruby / Alpha Sapphire - Wally Battle Theme Guitar Cover by RawkHawkRockin

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In the remake versions of Ruby and Sapphire, Wally, one of your rivals, gets his own theme. He is pretty frail and delicate at first so the theme is a little more fitting later on in the game. Due to the fact that this cover and the original are so similar it becomes an effort to replicate the original as closely as possible, and RawkHawkRockin does this brilliantly.

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There is not much information about RawkHawkRockin out there, besides that he does video game music covers and that he is Greek. Hopefully we will see more of him in the future!

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Pokemon Colosseum - Cipher Peon Full Band Metal Cover by Dr. Pez - VGM 

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Pokémon Colosseum is one of those games that not many people know about. The game is a GameCube game, in which the only Pokémon you can catch you actually have to snatch from other trainers. But before you freak out, these Pokémon have been corrupted to be fighting machines, unafraid of attacking humans. In this game it is your job to purify these creatures, returning them to their normal, uncorrupted states, as well as figure out who is responsible for all these "shadow Pokémon."

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More importantly, the musical cover is one of several battle themes, this one of a battle with a Cipher peon. Dr. Pez and his fellow musicians, HatTrax and Ashikodrum, handle this one with ease, though the original song was made for such instruments. In some ways, it is better that they do not deviate from the original's composition.

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Dr. Pez and Ashikodrum both do video game covers, and while HatTrax also covers these sorts of songs he also does some classic and progressive rock songs.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/c2d7d7a4282ccea888553498bddefdc6.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/c2d7d7a4282ccea888553498bddefdc6.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"6103","description":"

Pokémon R/S/E: Victory Road - Metal Cover || RichaadEB by RichaadEB

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Generation 3's Victory Road music is probably one of my favorite Victory Road themes. After Ever Grande city's encouraging theme this one seems more harsh and challenging.

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Ruby and Sapphire are full of synthesized trumpets and I am surprised how well the guitars fit. Nevertheless, metal is full of harsher sounds and thus such a style is fitting for the theme.

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RichaadEB, or Rich, is a YouTube guitarist who does (metal) covers of video game music, and otherwise is a big nerd.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/67a1a7cd688da2685945b9fec8aaf4b3.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/67a1a7cd688da2685945b9fec8aaf4b3.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"6102","description":"

Pokémon Theme Cover (feat. Dookieshed, MunchingOrange, NintendoFanFTW, and more!) by NateWantsToBattle

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I admit, I cheated a bit here. The Pokémon anime theme is not strictly game related, but it is not entirely unrelated either, so I decided to throw it in. A lot of us, now adults, remember this as part of our childhood, an accompaniment to the games.

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NateWantsToBattle, one of the many featured in this cover, is pretty talented on his own. I almost decided to go with his Lysandre's Theme cover. But then I found this and the nostalgia waves pummeled me into submission. Admit it, you like it too.

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NateWantsToBattle roped dookieshed, Munchingorange, NintendoFanFTW, RandomEncountersEnt, TheKingNappy, ReallyFreakinClever, and TheShueTube all into this video cover.

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NateWantsToBattle covers anime and video game songs. Dookieshed, Munchingorange and NintendoFanFTW all make their own videos about video games (walkthroughs, Top 10s, and other amusing things). RandomEncountersEnt and TheShueTube make their own parody music videos. TheKingNappy posts daily Pokémon content, and ReallyFreakinClever looks at and discusses game design choices.

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All in all, quite a crew!

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/0c4f5e8454b526e3ebf9c68075da172f.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/0c4f5e8454b526e3ebf9c68075da172f.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"6100","description":"

Champion Battle (Pokémon G/S/C) Guitar Cover by DSC

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This cover is based on one of the most intimidating themes in the Pokémon universe. In Gold, Silver and Crystal, as well as HeartGold and SoulSilver, it plays during the Champion battle with Lance, and during the final battle with Red. I remember my seven year old self finally reaching the Champion with my under-leveled team (I was at the age when I did not understand battling trainers was necessary and viewed them as an annoyance). The sense of foreboding, and the anxiety the theme music seemed to generate in me was practically tangible. And yet I felt so ready for the challenge.

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On guitars I have to admit while the song loses none of its awesomeness. But the parts with falling notes, for me, lose some of the feelings I remember watching my Pokémon's HP plummet after a nasty hit. That does not mean, however, that it is not a good cover, and it is worth a listen.

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DSC, or Dominic Choi, an Australian and the artist in question, posts game music covers every two weeks on Fridays on his YouTube channel.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/c06d94e848b183ac066b52e71425860c.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/c06d94e848b183ac066b52e71425860c.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"6099","description":"

Pokemon GSC - Game Corner [Guitar Cover] by BrodysGameMusic

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In the end, I picked this theme because the game corner, once a feature in the first 3-4 generations of games, was ultimately removed from the series. Players used to be able to trade coins they won by betting for Pokémon, items, TMs and in later installments, decorations for secret bases.

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Are the games worse off for their removal? Probably not, but the tune that played in the old Gold, Silver and Crystal game corner reminds me of a relatively carefree time of my life I sometimes wish I could go back to.

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BrodysGameMusic brings back this theme without most of the previously staccato notes, but I certainly do not mind because he keeps the original intent and spirit of the piece alive.

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BrodysGameMusic, or Brody, plays music as a hobby, covering mostly game music and occasionally writing some original tracks.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/68a1648d9fbaf0c2e8a6ac11091f7658.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/68a1648d9fbaf0c2e8a6ac11091f7658.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"6098","description":"

Pokemon (2nd gen) - "Team Rocket Battle" [Metal Guitar Cover] by Ferdk

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Ok, admittedly Team Rocket is a bit wimpy. But this song has always gotten me feeling ready for a fight, one way or another. Though Team Rocket may be undeserving of such an awesome metal cover and theme in the first place, I still love what Ferdk did with the battle theme. Turning the tune into a metal composition gave it an even more sinister feel.

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Ferdk is from Argentina and does metal video game covers in his spare time. He also writes his own original music.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/3c9128efa6b43456bc0796c91f83b130.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/3c9128efa6b43456bc0796c91f83b130.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"6097","description":"

Pokemon City Rock Medley (RBY/GSC) by Swiggles1987

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Since I found a load of Gold, Silver and Crystal covers as well, why not have a piece that combines Red, Blue and Yellow pieces with Gold Silver and Crystal pieces to transition between the two?

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Anyways, this is a pretty cool combination and takes on a number of city themes from the first two generations, including Vermillion, Viridian, and Saffron cities, as well as Olivine and Blackthorn cities. The S.S. Anne theme is also thrown in there for good measure.

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The medley changes up the tempos of a few of the songs a little and adds some embellishments here and there, but they ultimately are all excellent choices and I love what the artist did with it.

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Swiggles1987 covers video game music on YouTube (and takes requests), as well as composes music for smaller video games.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/3d2f396806e3fd83607e099c8cbdac10.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/3d2f396806e3fd83607e099c8cbdac10.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"6096","description":"

Pokémon R/B/Y Route 11 Guitar Cover Feat Paul Farrer by KawlumPlaysGuitar

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If I had to pick one route in the original Pokémon games with the best music, it would be route 11. There is something about the whole song that makes me feel like I really am on an epic journey. I was completely bummed, then, when I felt FireRed and LeafGreen butchered the theme.

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But this cover nails it.

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There are a few frills here and there, but they add to the cover rather than take away from it.

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KawlumPlaysGuitar and Paul Farrer had little information on each of them other than what was on their YouTube profiles. KawlumPlaysGuitar is "slowly 'Metalifying' the world" and Paul Farrer does metal covers and original songs. Well, I certainly hope to hear more from the both of them.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/b28dabc896550dd40d611704f7f8493b.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/b28dabc896550dd40d611704f7f8493b.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"6095","description":"

Pokemon RBY Gym Leader Guitar Cover by Galiasocial

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Another Red, Blue and Yellow cover! There are actually two versions of the cover in this video, one with drums and one without.

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Like the previous cover, this cover of the Red, Blue and Yellow Gym Leader and Elite Four theme brings new life to the tune. Due to the fact that guitars are pretty capable of emulating the sounds of other instruments (or even Gameboys) it sounds more than appropriate. Feeling nostalgic yet? I sure am.

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Galiasocial (or, Galia Social) is actually a trio of musicians: Colby Peters, Ed Rizo, and Christian Logaglio. They typically play pop and rock music in Florida though they may be branching out further to other regions.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/c5f68da842532094c423ac544c3aeb12.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/c5f68da842532094c423ac544c3aeb12.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"6093","description":"

Pokémon Battle Theme (Blue/Red/Yellow) Guitar Cover by Carlos Malanche

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Having played Blue, Red, Yellow, and FireRed and LeafGreen an absurd number of times, I have heard a couple of versions of this theme many times over. That being said, the tune is not one that gets old or annoying fast, which is a good thing because if you play the original games or the remakes you will be hearing it a lot.

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And while this cover sounds pretty similar to the original, it lends something to the theme that the Gameboy version perhaps did not have. Simply put, actual instruments sound way better than electronic beeps...unless that is the kind of sound you enjoy.

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Unfortunately there seem to be a lot of "Carlos Malanches" out there. This particular artist only has a few YouTube videos out there and no description on his account, so I was reduced to looking around Google, through many possible matches, none of which seemed likely. Whoever you are, dude, we appreciate your work.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/fad8116b590f5c5b670626e402dfeae4.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/fad8116b590f5c5b670626e402dfeae4.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"6092","description":"

Pokémon Route 1 on Guitar by CSGuitar89

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Ok, this one does not look like a rock cover in the first few seconds, but it gets there. There are a few covers in here that are a bit deceptive like that.  This tune brings back memories of my second journey in the Pokémon world. Unfortunately this also brings back memories of a failed randomizer Nuzlocke. I met a legendary in the wild. Amusingly (or perhaps frustratingly) it spontaneously combusted with Self-Destruct and eliminated my only Pokémon. Curse you, Registeel!

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However, I have to admit I like CSGuitar89's take on the theme. This cover is a bit more upbeat than even the original.

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CSGuitar89, or Casper, is from the Netherlands and does video game guitar covers. Some day he hopes to record his own original music.

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/7/3/8/738842c35cdd20fe1a7f46990de6567f.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/7/3/8/tiny_738842c35cdd20fe1a7f46990de6567f.jpg","type":"slide","id":"69581","description":"

Pokémon games, are, for the most part, not known best for their music. However, that does not mean the games are not filled with catchy, uplifting, and dramatic themes! Many are deserving of appreciation.

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I attempted to find as many different artists covering different tunes as I could, and what resulted was, to some extent, a bias towards the original games and Gold, Silver and Crystal, though almost every generation has something in here.

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Here are the 15 I picked out:

"}]]]>
Top 5 Pokemon Games (Main Series and Spin-off) https://www.gameskinny.com/5bkuv/top-5-pokemon-games-main-series-and-spin-off https://www.gameskinny.com/5bkuv/top-5-pokemon-games-main-series-and-spin-off Sun, 12 Apr 2015 08:36:55 -0400 Featured Contributor

The Pokémon franchise has been up and running for the past 17 years, adding more and more to the series as the time has rolled on. First starting out with just two games, Pokémon now has twelve main series games, six remake games, and a number of spin-off games - as well as a manga, anime, and movie series. Nintendo and Game Freak have obviously made some great games - everyone can agree on that - but in the scope of everything, there are some stand outs as the best games in the whole franchise.

1. Pokémon X & Y

Generation VI titles are a lot of people's favorite games in the series, even though they were released barely two years ago. X & Y introduced a lot things that were missing in the series while improving on the standard formula.

The game's 3D graphics were a big jump from the previous pixelation, but it was definitely a good thing. Full 3D characters, Pokémon, and cities showed more change and advancement for the series.

The long-awaited character customization was a definite plus, as well. Finally, after 15 years, players could make their character in the game look like them! (Though, if someone was Black, they'd just have to settle with a light tan as their skin color.) They could finally change their hair color and style, their skin and eye color, and even their outfits on a day-to-day basis. The fashion of the French-inspired Kalos made it all the more difficult to save money for actual Pokémon adventuring and not for the high-priced clothes in Lumiose City's Boutique Couture.

Pokémon-Amie was also one of the most fun and cutest additions to the series as a whole. Who doesn't want to play games and feed macaroons to their Pokémon? Especially if that Pokémon is Mewtwo, or Lugia, or Giratina, or some other Legendary no one would even think to play with.

All the other additions to the series and game (Mega-Evolution, character videos, the different types of trading, super-training, Fairy Type, and finally an attractive Professor) increased the fun and enjoyment of the series. It's not that hard to see why a lot of people like this game the most out of the whole series.

2. Pokémon Gold & Silver (And Crystal)

The second generation of Pokémon is (in my opinion) the most fun and the longest generation of the series. The journey in this generation is also much longer and more fun than in any of the other games. The player has to beat the eight Johto Gyms and bring down the newly resurrected Team Rocket.

Once they've beaten the Elite Four and become the Pokémon League Champion, they can now go back to Kanto to fight the original eight Gym Leaders! And if the player was strong enough, they got to battle Red at the summit of Mt. Silver. No other game in the series has allowed the player to do that, and that makes every other games' post-game seem kind of lackluster.

Not only that, but Game Freak made some significant improvements to these games after Red & Blue. They added a night/day, day/week system (perfect for getting Espeon and Umbreon), an improved Happiness and Friendship system, dual types, brand new types (Steel and Dark), and the option of playing another gender (though this only came in Crystal). Finally, the girls had some representation in a Pokémon game - and every one since then.

3. Pokémon Colosseum

Colosseum wasn't the first spin-off Pokémon game, but it's definitely the first one to do something different compared to the main series. Colosseum was vastly different to what the games were in 2003 when it was released. It didn't follow the standard formula of the main series titles. 

For one thing, players weren't able to normally catch Pokémon. In the game's story, Team Snagem wishes to rule the world with Shadow Pokémon, Pokémon that have turned into soulless fighting machines. You play as Wes, a former member of Team Snagem who tries to reverse their plans. Instead of normally catching these Shadow Pokémon, the players have to battle trainers and essentially steal them from their trainers in battle!


The fact that the game and its story is fully fleshed out on the Nintendo GameCube, and not a handheld, is also what makes this game so different. There are other Pokémon spin-offs that aren't on handhelds (like Stadium and Snap), but their stories couldn't compare to Colosseum or its sequel XD: Gale of Darkness. It showed players what the series could look like on a completely different system, as well as a different way of going about the series' main point: catching Pokémon. 

4. Pokémon Black & White


Generation V was the generation that brought some shock to the Pokémon community, as well as the video game community in general, with its surprising story.

The story of Black & White was a shocker because of how different it was, as compared to the other games'. Before, there was simply a crime syndicate that wanted to take over their region or the world (or universe, as in Team Galatic's plans).

Team Plasma was focused on liberating Pokémon from trainers and the so-called cruel fighting they were forced into. It's a very PETA-like stance and mission, but it brought up a real ethical issue for the series. Was it moral/ethical to participate in Pokémon battling? That in itself is an issue in real life as much as it is in the games.

The game's story was the basis for the introduction of the new 151 Pokémon, as well as more improvements and new mechanics. The other, original Pokémon are kept tucked away until the player beats the main game. As said by othersBlack & White treats the player like Ash. It places them in a brand new region without the chance or the familiarity of the original 500-some Pokémon and lets them go free. 

5. Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness 

The Mystery Dungeon series got a boost in recognition when it worked together with Pokémon to create one of the more interesting spin-offs in the franchise.

The Pokémon Mystery Dungeon series is different from the other spin-offs in how it completely focuses on Pokémon and only Pokémon. There are no trainers, no filling out the PokéDex, no battling the Elite Four. (At least in Colosseum and XD: Gale of Darkness they still retained some of the main points of the series.) These games follow the journeys of the Pokémon themselves, their individual characteristics and quirks, and whatever they do as they explore the randomized dungeons and world. 

The series' stories are also very interesting and entertaining. The fully fleshed-out journey is a joy to be immersed in and to follow. A story that seems to be typical of a Pokémon game gets darker and darker the further the player gets. The darker and more entertaining sides of the game emerge at the same time as a difficulty spike challenges the players more than before.

And that's the completed ranking of the top five Pokémon games. 

]]>
Top 10 Nintendo Franchises https://www.gameskinny.com/9y3q4/top-10-nintendo-franchises https://www.gameskinny.com/9y3q4/top-10-nintendo-franchises Sun, 28 Sep 2014 22:18:49 -0400 Brian Spaen

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1. Super Mario

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Series highlights:

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  • Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES - 1990)
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  • Super Mario World (SNES - 1991)
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  • Super Mario Galaxy (Wii - 2007)
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What did you expect? Nintendo's favorite plumber is not only their most successful mascot, but it's the most popular. Super Mario titles have sold well and Nintendo has no problems throwing the mascot on a game that may not sell as much, but Mario will spawn title sales.

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Whatever their last names are, both Mario and Luigi deserve getting some props. They've been a part of the Nintendo franchise from the beginning, and it will never dissolve.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/20bfe76b041bd6d6cee3d9768ee8844a.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/20bfe76b041bd6d6cee3d9768ee8844a.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"4645","description":"

2. The Legend of Zelda

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Series highlights:

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  • A Link to the Past (Super NES - 1991)
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  • Ocarina of Time (N64 - 1998)
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  • Wind Waker HD (Wii U - 2013)
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What else did you expect? We've barely talked about the top-down action adventure with a hint of RPG elements, but it's exactly what the doctor orders after a long week. The long quests featuring Link are both legendary and unique. While the series has gotten a tad stale with the same names again and again, changing things will help them in the long run.

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Ocarina of Time, the first title on N64, is regarded by some (including me) as the best game ever created. Every title's been a stellar hit, but when the games kick ass, you can easily be talked out of it.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/a8211a57e1db42a8344363dc47710e44.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/a8211a57e1db42a8344363dc47710e44.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"4644","description":"

3. Pokemon

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Series highlights:

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  • Pokemon Red/Blue (Game Boy - 1998)
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  • Pokemon Yellow (GB Color - 2000)
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  • Pokemon Crystal (GB Color - 2001)
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You can't deny Nintendo's most infamous small mascots. It's hard to keep track of them all -- especially since they branched out and don't try to play cross-country games. The original concept of having 150 total monsters and needing to play two games and trade with others playing a different cartridge was ideal -- even though you left with no points.

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There's only one franchise -- Pokemon -- that's sold over 260 million total titles in the franchise.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/7524259d576b87943f597d6d65ea0632.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/7524259d576b87943f597d6d65ea0632.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"4643","description":"

4. Mario Kart

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Series highlights:

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  • Mario Kart 64 (N64 - 1997)
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  • Mario Kart Wii (Wii - 2008)
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  • Mario Kart 7 (3DS - 2011)
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What was played before Super Smash Bros. ruled the college dorms? Nintendo 64's rendition of the Mario Kart franchise. MK64 is widely hailed as the franchise's high point, and the sequels have since kept up with its formula with the music, sounds, and familiar tracks.

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The Mario Kart franchise is the second-best selling product under the Mario umbrella with over 100 million copies, topping Madden, Assassins' Creed, and even the realistic racer, Gran Turismo.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/3013b21993d29b01c68c944ecf20e6e9.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/3013b21993d29b01c68c944ecf20e6e9.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"4642","description":"

5. Donkey Kong Country

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Series highlights:

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  • Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super Nintendo - 1995)
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  • Donkey Kong 64 (N64 - 1999)
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  • Donkey Kong Country Returns (Wii - 2010)
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The Super Nintendo trilogy was one of the most beautiful looking games in the 16-bit era, and while some didn't love the transition to a 3D platformer, the series ultimately fell to a sudden halt after Rare bolted to Microsoft.

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It made a triumphant return nearly 10 years later on the Wii with one of the hardest remakes in the franchise. DKC Returns will give absolutely anybody fits, even the masters of the original platformer during the SNES era. Even though DK64 has its place in history, it's hard to say this franchise doesn't thrive on its 2D brilliance.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/a5cca544ff163d73ea1d04550ce89caa.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/a5cca544ff163d73ea1d04550ce89caa.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"4641","description":"

6. Mario Party

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Series highlights:

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  • Mario Party 3 (N64 - 2001)
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  • Mario Party 5 (Gamecube - 2003)
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  • Mario Party 8 (Wii - 2007)
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Agreed, there's very few Nintendo franchises as uninventive as Mario Party, but I'll be damned if it isn't one of the most fun. Any game will test the patience of any video game player that truly says they don't get pissed if things aren't going their way in a multiplayer contest.

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Despite just having numbers after the titles, each game does have their own feel and uniqueness that fans will be asking for their favorite at a party. Ever have some buddies over and trying to figure out what to do with a case of beer? It doesn't get much better than a round of Mario Party.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/b076a4be2f4fadf6ec8f48cd8a82a493.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/b076a4be2f4fadf6ec8f48cd8a82a493.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"4640","description":"

7. Metroid

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Series highlights:

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  • Super Metroid (Super Nintendo - 1994)
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  • Metroid II: Return of Samus (Game Boy - 1991)
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  • Metroid Prime (Gamecube - 2002)
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It wasn't the best selling Nintendo franchise, but it featured one of the company's most unique and great games. One of the best platformer titles of all time -- Super Metroid -- is a game that many tried to mimic but couldn't duplicate. Even the jump to a first-person shooter felt comfortable because it didn't feel forced, weird, or much different from the predecessors.

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Metroid deserves to sit next to all the other popular Nintendo franchises. It won't be the first that comes off the tongue, but it may have had some of the best games ever created under the company's umbrella.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/f4ef95f8342181dd6e6178435995e282.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/f4ef95f8342181dd6e6178435995e282.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"4639","description":"

8. Wii Sports

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Series highlights:

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  • Wii Sports (Wii - 2006)
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  • Wii Sports Resort (Wii - 2008)
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  • Wii Sports Club (Wii U - 2013)
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Not many people would immediately think about Wii Sports as a franchise, but it's one of Nintendo's most successful games in history. The packaged add-on to the Wii console generated so much conversation that the franchise itself has sold over 109 million copies. Wii Sports was essentially a demo of what the Wii could do in its early stages. Unfortunately, the revolutionary machine couldn't do much past it, and gamers preferred the traditional controller over the Wiimote and Nunchuck combination.

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Still, the original five-sport demo was a blast to pop in whenever you were bored, and the sequel was just as fun with the additional games and play modes -- regardless of how simplified they are. Don't tell me there weren't multiple playthroughs of the 3-point challenge in basketball in Wii Sports Resort!

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9. Mario Sports

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Series highlights:

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  • NES Open (NES - 1991)
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  • Mario Tennis (N64 - 2000)
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  • Mario Super Sluggers (Wii - 2008)
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Realistic sports are a blast to play, but sometimes it's fun to add a little bit of craziness to it. Midway had the infamous NBA Jam and NFL Blitz titles, but Nintendo added their own spin with their most popular mascot and his friends. From the NES to the Wii U, Nintendo has always had a wide variety of sports titles featuring the plumber.

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Just trying to narrow it down to three titles is next to impossible. Outside of a solid football title, a popular North American sport, if there's any sport that you want to enjoy on a Nintendo console, a game with the mustached mascot will generally exceed expectations.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/e2ee2a0de4ea597ffc223a087891f8e7.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/e2ee2a0de4ea597ffc223a087891f8e7.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"4637","description":"

10. Super Smash Bros.

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Series highlights:

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  • Super Smash Bros. (Nintendo 64 - 1999)
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  • Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube - 2001)
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  • Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii - 2008)
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Who knew that putting Nintendo mascots in one big four player brawlfest would have become so popular? The series kicked off with the insanely fun N64 debut, but the series hit its high point with SSB: Melee, a game that ruled dorms and parties throughout the turn of the millennium and partly why the Gamecube was as successful as it got. For a series that just has three titles, selling over 22 million copies is a true testament to how fun the game is.

"},{"image":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/adda9b230007ac085c64d13f969f8487.jpg","thumb":"http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/tiny_adda9b230007ac085c64d13f969f8487.jpg","type":"slide","id":"52367","description":"

There's nothing quite like Nintendo franchises in the video game industry. It's why the Japanese giant continues to publish on their own systems -- there's a huge variety of games that simply can't be found on other consoles or the PC.

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The reason for why the rankings are as they are is a combination of popularity, sales, and the historic value of the series. Each of these franchises own a piece of history that will be stored in Nintendo's vault and be treasured for the rest of time. Generations will pass, and with each new one that comes, they'll get to admire where not only it all began, but the legendary chapters since.

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Enjoy a ranking of the best 10 Nintendo franchises of all time, and debate which you think should be higher or lower on the chart, or if you believe a franchise has been left out.

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10 Things You May Not Know About Pokemon https://www.gameskinny.com/crptm/10-things-you-may-not-know-about-pokemon https://www.gameskinny.com/crptm/10-things-you-may-not-know-about-pokemon Fri, 08 Aug 2014 16:26:55 -0400 poliwagg

The Pokémon World is filled with mystery. Since the 90's, Pokémon Trainers have travelled "across the lands, searching far and wide" to uncover the secrets of this world inhabited by strange, beautiful, and captivating creatures. The Pokémon games have changed tremendously since the release of Pokémon Red and Blue (and Green in Japan). We're going to take a look back through the games and reveal some facts you may have not known about your favorite Pocket Monsters:

1. In Generation I (Red, Blue, and YellowBite and Gust were normal-type moves.

Starting with the very first games, this fact is very weird for those of us who have gotten used to these attacks now. Imagine picking up a Game-boy with Pokémon Red, and furiously tapping A yelling "Pidgey why isn't your Gust sweeping all these grass-type Pokémon!" Sounds terrible, doesn't it? Even worse, dark-type Pokémon didn't exist! These attacks were changed in Generation II and onward. Bite became a dark-type move, and Gust became a flying-type move. There you go Pidgey, now you can defeat those Oddish.

2. In Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue there's an invisible PC in the Celadon Hotel

Most likely an overlooked detail, the Celadon Hotel contains a fully functional PC that you cannot see. In fact, you can even walk through it. The hotel's design is based on that of a Pokémon Center, thus if you walk to the area where you would normally find a PC inside a Pokémon Center you can access this ghost machine.

3. Dragonair (13'01") is bigger than Dragonite (7'03").

I admit this may not be that interesting, but I bet you didn't know! Dragonair is almost twice the height of Dragonite. Evolving may make it shorter, but at least it gains some curves.

4. Pokémon Crystal is the first Pokémon game where you could play as a Female.

This was a huge deal for girl Pokémon fans. Before this game, one always had pretend to be a boy. Girls wanted to feel identified in the world of Pokémon as well. Clearly, the demand was heard. Since Crystal, female protagonists have always been offered. In fact, starting in Generation III, a female can even be your rival. 

5. A level 100 Shuckle can potentially deal the most damage in a single attack.

Honestly, this is just something for fun. It's legitimate, but I can't see it actually working out in battle. I can't even begin to rephrase this so:

A level 100 Shuckle can potentially deal the most damage in one single attack through the use of numerous stat boosters; by using Helping Hand by two different Pokémon in a Triple battle, holding a Metronome, Power Trick, a Skill Swap to Pure Power or Huge Power, 6 Attack boosts, and a Mimicked Me First used on a slower Pokémon using the Defense Curl/Rollout combo. Also, Shuckle's partner must have the ability Flower Gift and the weather must be sunny. On the 5th turn of using Rollout consecutively without any misses, if used against a level 1 Ledyba, Yanma or Combee with minimum Defense stats, that have been hit with negative Defense modifiers (such as Screech), it can deal 481,266,036 damage with a critical hit.

Wow. Who would have guessed?

6. Brendan, from Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire, does not have white hair. His hair is actually black, and only looks white due to his hat. 

In the upcoming remakes of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire (Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire) this detail is more apparent. However in the previous game versions, most people thought Brendan's hair was actually white and that he wore a bandana. What a strange hat, Brendan. Oh well, look at you now. All tan and showing us all that your hair is, indeed, beneath that white cap.

7. Heatran (Generation IV) is the first, and so far only, Legendary Pokemon that can be Male or Female.

There are some Pokémon that just change the rules of the game. Legendary Pokémon have rarely even had genders. Heatran is a special exemption: it can be Male or Female. Don't get too excited though, this doesn't mean you can make little baby Heatran. This legendary Pokémon is still unavailable for mating, but this fact is pretty interesting considering the rules of breeding.

8. Cryogonal (Generation V) can learn the move Attract, despite lacking a Gender.

Attract does not affect genderless Pokémon. In fact, the only other genderless Pokémon that can learn Attract is Mew for the reason that it can learn ANY attack. For both, however, the attack is useless. So much love to give, yet no love on the receiving end... What a tragic tale.

9. Pokémon Black 2 and White 2 are the only core series games in which the Pokémon Day Care is inaccessible before entering the Hall of Fame

You usually encounter a Pokémon Daycare around the beginning of your adventure. You've been breeding two Pokes since Generation II, and listening to how "no one knows where the eggs came from". But Pokémon Black 2 and White 2 take that comfort away from you. You must first beat the Elite 4, and then you'll get some breeding time.

10. Pokémon X and Y are the first core series games that give Running Shoes at the start of the game.

This was, personally, the nicest surprise in the most recent Pokémon game. If you've ever played Generation I, you had to deal with walking speed until you got the bike. Thank god things have changed. Not only do you move fast in Pokémon X and Y, you skate. This results in actually having to take a break from the speed and appreciate the walking feature as well.

 I hope these facts were new to most of you. There are still many facts hidden within the regions of Pokémon, it's our job to find 'em all. Are there any strange Pokémon facts you know that weren't mentioned?

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A Crystal Clear look at Twitch Plays Pokémon 2.0 https://www.gameskinny.com/65pcz/a-crystal-clear-look-at-twitch-plays-pokemon-20 https://www.gameskinny.com/65pcz/a-crystal-clear-look-at-twitch-plays-pokemon-20 Mon, 03 Mar 2014 09:49:12 -0500 MANGO SENTINEL

After the 16-day marathon that was Twitch Plays Pokémon Red, there was a 24 hour period on the stream with a timer leading to "a new adventure." Yesterday at 7am EST, the cycle began anew with the dawn of Twitch Plays Pokémon Crystal. The 3rd version of the Generation II games, Pokémon Crystal, is sure to have plenty of interesting moments on stream, including the inevitable reunion with Red at the top of Mount Silver.

But can the new play through captivate us with the same delightful disorganized dysfunction that the first one ascended into legend with?

So far, I think the answer is a huge YES. Maintaining nearly the same consistent 50,000+ viewer count for most of its existence, Twitch Plays Pokémon is not a flash in the pan by any means. With a new format for Democracy and Anarchy that helps to clear the chat of the warfare between the two camps and a fresh new protagonist in "AJ Downs," Twitch Plays Pokémon--to the dismay of some and the delight of others--does not seem to be going anywhere anytime soon.

Two of our new pals: "Lazor Gator" the Totodile and "Prince Omelette" the Togepi

Making surprising progress by 30 hours in, AJ Downs and friends have already powered through 3 Badges in the Johto region! I'm not sure if collectively we've gotten better at Twitch Plays Pokémon or if it's just a streak of some dumb luck, but you can't deny the results, and more importantly you can't deny that the phenomenon that is Twitch Plays Pokémon is still alive and well!

So if you were late to the party on the run of Pokémon Red and want to experience what all the fuss was about, head on over to the stream and don't miss out again!

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Twitch Plays Pokemon Crystal https://www.gameskinny.com/06kn1/twitch-plays-pokemon-crystal https://www.gameskinny.com/06kn1/twitch-plays-pokemon-crystal Sun, 02 Mar 2014 06:38:09 -0500 Corey Kirk

After many battles, constant wondering, and religious uprisings consisting of Lord Helix and Bird Jesus worship, participants in the grand Twitch Plays Pokémon experiment finally beat Pokémon Red. Does that mean the popular Twitch channel, which regularly pulls in over 70k viewers a day, just up and quits broadcasting?

NEVER!

http://i.imgur.com/81F5O26l.jpg

After a break of 24 hours, a new challenge awaits for those willing to take another adventure. This time, aspiring trainers are taking on Pokémon Crystal which first released in Japan in 2000 and North America in 2001. Unlike Pokémon Red, which is a generation one game featuring the original 150 Pokémon, Crystal features 251 Pokémon for a complete pokedex. The game also has improved visuals so we won’t have to stare at a black and white screen the whole time.

It took over two weeks of play time to beat Pokémon Red, so we can expect that Pokémon Crystal will take about the same time or longer. At the time of this writing, we are only 4 hours into what promises to be a fun time.

So fellow trainers, grab your secret keys, fossils, and TM 17s and prepare for battle while Twitch Plays Pokémon!

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