Tales of Berseria Articles RSS Feed | GameSkinny.com Tales of Berseria RSS Feed on GameSkinny.com https://www.gameskinny.com/ en Launch Media Network 8 Games and Franchises with the Biggest Translation Gaffes https://www.gameskinny.com/3ja5f/8-games-and-franchises-with-the-biggest-translation-gaffes https://www.gameskinny.com/3ja5f/8-games-and-franchises-with-the-biggest-translation-gaffes Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:30:01 -0400 Joshua Broadwell

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Breath of Fire II

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Fans love to hate Capcom. Sometimes, it seems unfair. Other times, like when you remember Breath of Fire II, then it's completely understandable, and you just step back and let things go. Oh, if only the above picture had been true.

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The early BoF games had an interesting history. Squaresoft handled the first one's localization and publishing. It had some problems, sure. The dialogue and mechanics were rough around the edges but there's still enjoyment to be had with it.

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You would think of the BoF games, the first would have all the terrible issues, that Square would have taken the opportunity to sabotage a potential rival creeping in on its RPG monopoly.

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Or perhaps someone at Square could tell that left to its own devices, Capcom would do that quite nicely on its own.

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Breath of Fire II's translation and localization are full of ludicrous descriptions and sound effects and unclear dialogue. It's a showing on par with gems from the '80s like "all your base are belong to us" and Castlevania II.

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It's near Deborah Cliff...

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There are some classic signs of bad, careless translation as well, where the untranslated text is left in alongside the translated script, or even worse, the writer just added a transliteration, which isn't, y'know... actually a translation.

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Manju are Japanese buns, so this particular instance is one of those cases where you forget  where the writer forgets to delete what they chose not to use. Note the transliteration was highlighted as the key point, though.

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Other errors are less in keeping with the context. I'm not sure about you, but I see what could possibly be a boar — no bears, though.

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It's amazing how punctuation can be so significant. Some bizarre uses of periods in here, except where a period is actually needed.

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At first glance, there doesn't appear to be anything wrong with these two. It's just a nice, normal observation from a character who obviously hasn't seen Nina for a while. Except, she isn't seeing Nina now either.

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This isn't a case where the party members all fold into the leader. The girl with the wings near the table? That's Nina. This woman just told Ryu he's not a little girl anymore, and I can only imagine how surprised he must have been to learn that.

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If these things had remained a relic of the '90s BoF II, that would be a different story. But two different re-releases later — first on the Game Boy Advance and then on the Virtual Console — and Capcom still believed this translation was worth keeping.

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---

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Modern games aren't free from the plague of bad translation, sadly, but their shortcomings certainly do provide an amusing way to pass the time. Whether it's Capcom's carelessness in the '90s, Atlus's rushed schedule from a few years back, or the flood of cheap titles inundating digital platforms, it seems like bad translations are simply a universal factor of gaming life.

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Got any examples of terrible game translations? Share yours in the comments!

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Persona 5

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Including Persona 5 on this list might be controversial. However, there's no denying that good though the game undoubtedly is, it falls far short of Atlus's standards in localization and what fans have come to expect from the company. That departure from the high-quality norm is a bigger gaffe than any translation awkwardness in the game.

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Fortunately, for the most part, the game's dialogue quirks don't come anywhere near Kitty Love and Hollow Fragment levels of bad. You do have to pause for a moment and consider what's being said from time to time, though.

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Morgana is pretty quirky to begin with, so at first glance, this seems like just another manifestation of that personality. But the sentence doesn't technically make sense. "seriously trying to kill us" maybe or "serious about killing us," but serious to kill us is what you'd expect from an inexperienced translator or an early ESL student.

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Conner Kramer put together a site listing some notably egregious errors (and getting some flak for it from the fan community as well), and he added some alternatives for a few of them. Here's an example:

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His revision is a lot more like what fans got in Persona 4 and much more in keeping with the character doing the speaking as well. One would expect a high school principle to say something like "misdemeanor is not tolerated..." as opposed to "you will behave yourself," which is better suited to an elementary school setting.

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There are other signs of carelessness too.

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Image via j-entranslations

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Persona games rely heavily on good dialogue to push the story forward and keep players interested. These issues are hardly game breaking, but they do break the immersion, which makes it difficult to remain invested.

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What lies behind the issue is a mystery. It's possible some elements of localization were a rushed job, since the game was delayed to begin with. But it's equally possible it was simply oversight.

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Yu Namba, senior project manager at Atlus and responsible for a good deal of Persona games' localization processes, once said he couldn't account for everything that happened, but tried to make sure the core narrative was coherent and clear. Other things could slip through the cracks, as they apparently did for P5.

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Kitty Love

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The Switch has taken over the Vita's place as supreme host of otome games. The eShop is flooded with romance games, most of which are geared towards female audiences, and many of which have rather low production values.

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Kitty Love takes the crown for one of the worst translations, though. It's the usual quirky premise for one of these games. The protagonist works at a flower shop by day and turns into a cat by night, because why not.

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As is a growing trend with eShop games, the game's end result is less than stellar, with apparently very little in the way of quality control either by the developer or Nintendo's alleged curation process.

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The quintessential tourist activity — buttering the day

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Some of the errors here aren't quite Hollow Fragment bad, but they do range from the mild to the completely unintelligible, up to the "how could you think this was okay?"

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The protagonist is in cat form in the above, so presumably, this is just a special way of saying he held the cat

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Many of the scenarios just take a bit of figuring out to understand.

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That isn't one of them, though.

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Or that one.

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Okay, so maybe it is on par with Hollow Fragment.

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That's...not good.

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Slapdash niche games riddled with errors aren't exactly new, but there are a couple of things that make Kitty Love stand out as particularly noteworthy.

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The first is the fact that it exists at all on the Switch eShop. Nintendo claimed from the eShop's early days that it would be akin to a curated platform, and not every pitch, even from well-known developers, would be accepted. Fast forward two short years, and it seems that policy has quietly been abandoned.

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What's more, unlike some games, including Hollow Fragment, Kitty Love continues to exist in this form — no patches, no changes, no discounts. Whether the amusing dialogue is worth the price of admission is for you to decide.

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Pokemon Crystal: Vietnamese Version

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Pokemon Vietnamese Crystal has been a thing on the internet for many years, and it's practically a meme generator. The game has a strange history. It started as a Chinese translation of the Japanese script, but despite being considered a Vietnamese version, the game is pretty much entirely in English.

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Players are greeted with this.

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They do? I'm...so sorry

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For some reason, the translator was a bit free with referring to Pokemon as Elf and as Monster, depending on the context, though there didn't seem to be much of a guiding reason behind which scenario got which reference. Either way, there's not much of a link between professor or scholar and monster.

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Some of the text is comprehensible, and you can get an idea of how it went from the original meaning to the slightly garbled one.

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Friend makes sense, since Pokemon are often referred to as friend in the script. Store... eh. Center and shop are close, but that's starting to stretch it (especially when everything in there is free).

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And then you get ones like this, from the next script point.

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It's easy to pick up on the fact that "grasp" is used for catch, but basin?

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This early conversation shortly after the rival makes an appearance is unique, but not actually instructive.

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This one doesn't seem to be very clear either, until you realize he's talking about Mr. Pokemon.

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Apart from the phrasing, it makes sense. I don't know what the original script says, but I imagine it's something referring to Mr. Pokemon as an older man, hence "Grandfather."

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But then you get this again.

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And this.

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The battle system is its own set of special. The theory goes that perhaps there was an indexing error that threw descriptions and translations off, since some are correct, just out of place. Other issues involved transliterating Japanese grammatical particles that weren't intended to be spoken or read.

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But it doesn't explain everything about it or the naming conventions.

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It certainly doesn't explain the unique way of obtaining items, where the game throws the F-bomb your way every time you place an item in the bag.

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Most of the game is almost impossible to understand. If you're interested, you can check out the original Let's Play that sparked the phenomenon. 

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Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment

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Sword Art Online is a popular transmedia franchise, spanning manga, anime, and video games. In most cases, SOA in all of its forms tells a compelling story with likeable characters, and it's garnered a decent-sized following in the West. We even ranked Sword Art Online: Hollow Realization as one of 2017's best anime franchise games.

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Its sequel, Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment had a very, very rough start in the West, though. Like a handful of other Japanese games released in Asia before the West, it initially had an Asian release with an English language option.

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But that translation was bad. In fact, bad doesn't even begin to cover it.

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Japan has its share of race problems, but this wasn't an instance of blatant insensitivity. This is just referring to Kirito, the man wearing black. Though, I don't think he was sexually harassing anyone.

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This isn't exactly what you'd expect to find as a subject line in a hero's inbox.  Fear not, though — it's just monster extermination, SAO Asian translation-style.

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The translation was also just plain lazy. SAO games stray into racy territory now and again, but , this isn't a reference to one of those adult visual novel scenes. This is just bad translation of a symbol with a wide variety of meanings, most of which relate to war, exploration, and things like that.

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Fans who played the version that existed prior to the improved translation patch saw lots of references to penetration throughout the game, in some unusual contexts as well.

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Some of the (many) instances do make me wonder whether the translator had a slight idea of what they were saying and tried to just make a joke out of it.

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This wasn't the only instance of single-minded determination to stick to one translation regardless of context either.

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A standard Japanese greeting is yoroshiku, or the full version, yoroshiku onegaishimasu. It can mean a variety of things, from "nice to meet you," to "let's get along" or "let's work together," among other potential definitions.

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It's useful when you first meet someone, of course. But Asuna and other characters  would say this every time Kirito chose them to accompany him on a penetration — er, that is, an exploration trip.

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Same to you!

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There are countless other instances of unclear or ridiculous phrasing as well.

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This being one good example.

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As a matter of fact, there is.

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Bandai Namco isn't known for always making the best decisions, but it's odd how an established company ended up using a very evidently poorly trained translator for the original English version.

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One of my favorite things about being underground is seeing the sky.

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The Tales of... Games

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Bandai Namco's Tales of... series is known for its endearing characters, interesting plots, and snappy dialogue. However, not all entries are created equally.

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The most recent new Tales of game, Tales of Berseria, was lauded for its darker take on the usually chipper stories and characters, but it suffered from some very uneven dialogue and writing towards the end of the game

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Not all the errors are quite as confusing as this one, though.

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But the biggest issue with the numerous gaffes towards the end of the game is that most of them end up completely unintelligible, like these next two.

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Bandit shrooms don't even exist in the game.

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It's worth noting the voiced lines don't always match with the written dialogue, though. This fact leads some to suspect that perhaps what happened with Berseria was a sudden change in script or direction near the end of production that didn't make it to the localization department and was just crammed in at the last minute.

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Errors in Earlier Games
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Either way, these kinds of issues aren't restricted to modern titles. Clyde Mandellin with Legends of Localization noticed this interesting mistake in Tales of the Abyss that's rather easy to overlook.

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In between all the talk of fonons and fomicry in the early part of the game, it's easy to forget that the seventh fonon was known about for a long, long time. After all, how could Tear be a practicing Seventh Fonist if it was only just discovered?

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The error here comes from a loose translation of the original Japanese, which only said it was the most recently discovered, which doesn't give any kind of time reference.

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Then there was the official English translation of Tales of Phantasia, with this interesting little nugget.

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The original line was Ragnarok, but Mandelin says older versions of Microsoft Word didn't include Ragnarok in the dictionary and only offered Kangaroo with a capital K as the first recommended choice. This one was a careless spell check error that somehow managed to make it through to publication.

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Why the editors of a fantasy game script thought spell check could be relied on anyway is another matter.

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Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana

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The Ys series is one of gaming's longest-running series, with Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana being the most recent entry. While its action oriented gameplay and immersive worlds haven't changed dramatically over the decades, its publication status in the West certainly has.

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Most of the early titles after the original two ended up as fan translations, before XSeed began bringing them over as part of its partnership with developer Nihon Falcom (we won't talk about that Konami incident with Ys VI).

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And then came Nippon Ichi Software America. As part of Falcom's attempts to expand its international audience, it gave the publishing license for Ys VIII to NISA, with some initially unforeseen results.

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This character's bowel habits became a running gag in the original translation, which shouldn't be too surprising since NISA also gave us Esty Dee (STD) as a localization joke (as they did in Atelier Rorona: The Alchemist of Arland).

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It's okay Reja; most of us don't either.

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The game was riddled with untranslated text, randomly scattered here and there — a common error in badly handled games from the '90s, but not something one would expect from modern games. It's certainly not in keeping with what fans expected, which made it stand out all the more.

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Lines like this are common as well, making certain narrative segments and even dialogue a sort of guessing game. But that's not the worst thing.

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The game originally had a passable English translation, especially for most main segments and place names. Why NISA  re-translated isn't clear, particularly when the re-translation was as it was.

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Fortunately, NISA publicly recognized its errors and re-re-translated the script, providing a much better experience all 'round and apparently earning Falcom's trust enough to warrant being given its next big overseas project, The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel III

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Final Fantasy Games

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Most Final Fantasy games are high quality, well-produced works. That doesn't mean they are error-free, but for the most part, the base games are well-written with good localization.

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Unfortunately, Square Enix has gained a reputation for not really caring about how those high quality works transfer to other platforms based on their lazy ports and similarly low-effort localizations.

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No, the above isn't a screenshot from an alternate Final Fantasy IV universe where the Red Wings were Baron's premiere delivery service with Cecil as their leader. It's the first line of script in the mobile FFIV port.

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The port was supposed to use the DS version's script, but obviously, something happened along the way. It made its own mistakes, while keeping those of its predecessor.

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And then there's the mobile port of Final Fantasy VI.

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Given how many times "esper" appears in the script, it's baffling how this mistake wasn't caught before the game launched, to say nothing of the awkward phrasing that was left untouched.

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Still, the script is entirely readable, unlike some other inclusions in this list. The biggest issue is that errors like this are expected with most SE ports, causing one to wonder about the overall attitude of the port teams and the company towards its franchises.

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Errors in Original Versions
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However, the original versions are certainly not free from errors.

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Final Fantasy VII fans will already know this screenshot contains two errors The potentially less obvious one is Aeris's name. It's actually meant to be Aerith, and that's how it appears in all later mentions in the Final Fantasy universe.

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This was a common translation error in the 1990s, when localization teams were apparently not experienced in differentiating between easily misunderstood Japanese characters. Most people know about the "L" and "R" confusion, but "S" and "TH" is another one.

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There are, of course, other linguistic challenges to overcome as well.

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That above is a wyvern in Final Fantasy V.

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There's not really any reason other than just "whoops" for this one from Final Fantasy X, though to be fair, it was fixed in the HD remasters.

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Video game fans have been dealing with the highs and lows of translation and localization since the 1980s. It's a risk built into a hobby that often relies on media translated from one context-sensitive language to a very different one.

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Some of the early examples of translation gaffes have made their way into meme-dom and are among the best-known examples of games gone wrong, games such as Top Wing and Ghosts N' Goblins.

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As time progressed, one would think these issues would gradually fade away, with more experienced translators and bigger budgets.

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That, however, didn't happen. Through the 1990s and up to recent years, video games still dealt shoddy translations, rushed schedules, and bad management — even some of the bigger games and studios.

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Some of the more egregious errors in these games and franchises are what this list focuses on, examples of games that should have been better from companies that ought to know better. Along the way, we'll touch on the reasons behind the gaffes and explore what, if anything, was done to remedy the problems.

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JRPGs Aren't In Decline... It's Just Square Enix's Offerings That Are https://www.gameskinny.com/g0j1j/jrpgs-arent-in-decline-its-just-square-enixs-offerings-that-are https://www.gameskinny.com/g0j1j/jrpgs-arent-in-decline-its-just-square-enixs-offerings-that-are Tue, 28 Feb 2017 08:00:01 -0500 Kris Cornelisse (Delfeir)

The JRPG genre rose to prominence almost entirely off the backs of two notable game development companies; Squaresoft and Enix. Responsible for bringing us the Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest series respectively, a huge amount of the most notable RPGs (and a number of less notable or unlocalized games besides) were created or published by these two developers.

Prior to the release of the PlayStation, you would be hard pressed to find a JRPG released in English-speaking territories that didn’t brandish either the Squaresoft or Enix logos. There are exceptions of course, notably on Sega systems -- I’d be loathe to ignore Phantasy Star or the Shining series -- but many would be unlikely to name those at first if asked for a JRPG series title.

More companies would start to join in the JRPG market throughout the PlayStation era, such as Konami or Monolith Soft, and the market quickly saw a boom of new titles that would continue well into the late PS2 era. But all throughout, many walked in the shadow of these two giants, or owed their continued existence to Squaresoft publishing for them. Every Suikoden or Xenosaga that was released would still never be held to the general pedestal that games such as Final Fantasy VII or Chrono Trigger stood upon.

Then, in 2003, the unthinkable happened: Squaresoft and Enix joined forces, merging into Square Enix and remaining as such to the present day.

One would think such a monumental occasion would change the landscape of JRPGs forever, and Square Enix would catapult themselves even higher to the top echelons of developers unopposed.

Did that happen? Nope. Not even close.

If anything, the vast majority of offerings in the JRPG genre since then by the company have been... well, questionable. In fact, I’d argue that since the merger, there have been almost zero titles from them to match their respective high points while separate. There was even a stretch of time where the vast majority of games from Square Enix weren’t JRPGs, almost as if they’d abandoned the genre entirely.

Does that mean that the JRPG has since died out, then? Nope. Not even close.

Despite some inklings that JRPGs are lacking in innovation or have declined in quality, the genre continues to see numerous excellent titles released from a range of companies.

Innovations and developments continue to be made, yet the core of the genre remains present, and many classic elements are still revisited in new and interesting ways. Thanks to the increased size of the gaming market in recent generations, more and more games of all genres are being made by companies new and old -- and JRPGs are no exception.

No, dear readers, it is not the JRPG that has fallen into disarray -- it is merely Square Enix’s offerings to the genre that are in serious need of improvement. Let’s dive deeper.

Classical History

Since Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest are the classic series most are acquainted with, we’ll start with those. For those familiar with the respective series, I offer a question: Which of the numbered games in those series was your favorite?

(Yes, Final Fantasy Tactics and Dragon Quest Monsters were great, but humour me here and pick a number.)

Were I to survey or inquire the answers to that question, I think you’ll find that the vast majority of people offering favorite Final Fantasy titles will say somewhere between VI and IX, with occasional outliers between IV and X. Dragon Quest is most likely to be a toss up between V and VIII, though any between III and VIII could also be selected. Does this sound about right?

How many of these particular titles were released prior to the merger of Squaresoft and Enix, though? Excluding Dragon Quest VIII, all of them.

The first numbered non-MMORPG Final Fantasy game to be released under the merged banner was XII. While reasonably well received, it had a lot of mixed opinions on it, and it’s rare to find people who would hands-down consider it their favorite. Since then, we had XIII and its sequels, and while there are occasional defenders or proponents of parts of those games, the overall opinion is that they were a massive misstep.

Not convinced? How about XIV, also an MMO? Well, on release, the game was universally panned and responses were massively negative, so much so that Square Enix had to bring down the game and rebuild it entirely from the ground up with a new team. A Realm Reborn turned out to be quite good, but we cannot ignore that initial disaster; Square Enix is quite possibly the only company in gaming history to salvage a game like that, and most others would simply consider the expenditure too great and cut their investment right there.

Last chance, then... FFXV? Well... I could write many, many things about FFXV, and there’d be plenty of negatives in there to talk about. There’s decent gameplay, but the story is an utter mess and the open world is graphically pretty but largely devoid of things to do. It’s a flawed and unfinished game, regardless of whatever positives you might take away from it.

Now for Dragon Quest, almost all of which were developed prior to the merger. The first to be released under the Square Enix banner was Dragon Quest VIII, which would be the best offering but for one catch: it was actually developed by Level 5, rather than a studio within Square Enix.

Lest we think that it’s just their flagship RPG series effected, let’s try another example: Star Ocean, created by Tri-Ace and Enix before transferring to Square Enix. With five major games in the series, it’s widely regarded that the first three are considerably stronger than the latest offerings. Guess what? Star Ocean 3: Till the End of Time was released shortly before the merger. Compare most of the RPG series released by Square Enix and similar trends will be evident.

What about Kingdom Hearts, I hear some people asking? That is something I will concede as breaking the trend, but only in part. The first game was released before the merger, but Kingdom Hearts 2 was some time after, and it was received quite strongly.

But as a whole, I would say that the series is still hardly an exception to Square Enix’s declining offerings to the JRPG genre. While it does have good games, it’s also had some pretty weak ones as well. In addition, it seems like the company is doing everything in their power to hold off releasing Kingdom Hearts 3, with countless remasters adding tiny little details and padding out anything they can.

People bought PS3s under the assumption that it would be on it, after all...

So what happened? Well, if anything, the merger saw Square Enix become more of a publisher than an in-house developer. A massive number of games from a large number of companies worldwide are published under the Square Enix banner. This initially focused more on JRPGs, but has grown to include many varied genres and notable series, including Tomb Raider, Just Cause and Deus Ex.

An epic quest in the palm of your hand

If there was a decline in the number and quality of JRPGs available, it would probably fall within the previous console generation. Many are quick to highlight the number of quality RPGs available for the PS2 -- and earlier consoles -- but you’d be reaching a little further to list an equivalent number of solid PS3 or Xbox 360 titles.

But that’s not to say that they weren’t there; rather, they were to be found on handheld gaming systems. With the rising costs of quality game development, many smaller developers turned to the DS or PSP, as well as their successors, to develop their RPGs.

Square Enix was no stranger to this trend as well. Two of their most successful JRPGs released since their merger -- The World Ends With You, and Bravely Default -- were released on handheld systems. Dragon Quest made the switch to DS with the release of IX, and the upcoming DQXI is slated to arrive on 3DS and PS4.

Those who considered there to be a dearth of quality JRPGs were probably focused more on home consoles, but the genre has been alive and well in a portable form throughout.

Admittedly, many larger JRPG series fell dormant during this time period from other companies as well. While there was a spinoff Suikoden game on DS, no numbered title has been released since V on the PS2; the same can be said of Breath of Fire.

Which leads into the next point: many JRPG series are actually seeing new titles and rebirth on smartphones. Unfortunately, many of these are little more than name drops in order to attract a quick dollar, even by notable companies -- anyone who says Breath of Fire VI is worthy of that number is, I’d argue, completely delusional.

Failing that, they often are freemium Gachapon games with minimal gameplay and little more than a theme connected to the series in order to lure fans. Even Nintendo has started to fall into this trend; Fire Emblem Heroes fits this bill to a tee, though in its defence, it is of considerably higher quality and has stronger gameplay than many other alternatives.

However, despite my cynicism and the existence of some blatant cash grabs, there are admittedly more and more JRPGs being developed for smartphones that are actually worthy of attention. Are they quality enough to compare to games on other systems? Your mileage will probably vary on that, but there are certainly some that are worthy of attention, such as the recently released Dandy Dungeon.

Square Enix has been quick to jump onto this mobile bandwagon, too. The number of freemium titles they have is quite frankly excessive, but there are a whole slew of their titles available on smartphones that range from ports of classic Final Fantasy games to wholly original titles or remakes. They’re often extremely pricey compared to the wealth of cheap competitors on systems, but a handful of them are arguably quality enough to justify a purchase.

The point is that the JRPG is (and has always been) alive and well on handhelds and mobile, even if not on home consoles. But it’s not as though the consoles have been bereft of quality titles, either.

Square Enix aren’t the only JRPG developers

With all the money and attention that Square Enix receives, it’s understandable that their projects are the ones in the limelight -- that’s AAA gaming in a nutshell. They are effectively the JRPG developing and publishing equivalent of Electronic Arts or Activision Blizzard for first-person shooters.

But a big budget and high profile isn’t necessary for making quality games, as the growing indie scene can rightfully attest to. It’s not uncommon for some great JRPGs to emerge on PC from relatively unheard of developers; Zeboyd Games, the makers of Cthulhu Saves the World, are currently close to release on Cosmic Star Heroine, which is a love letter to the classic Phantasy Star games.

Failing that, there is a thriving scene of developers utilising RPG Maker or other engines to craft JRPGs by the droves, many of which are quite innovative or put interesting spins on classic concepts. Consider Undertale, or any of the games like it.

It’s not just indie companies making JRPGs, either. Square Enix may have the limelight, but perhaps you’ve heard of a series called The Legend of Heroes? My love for Trails of Cold Steel is well documented, but Nihon Falcom has been producing quality RPGs of all kinds for as long as Squaresoft was. Thanks to the hard work of companies like XSEED, these series are finally starting to see more of a resurgence in the West or on home consoles.

You can also look to the absolutely staggering number of games that are localised and published by Nippon Ichi to find a number of JRPGs that you might have otherwise overlooked. Seriously, there’s a lot, coming from a number of development companies such as Gust or Compile Heart.

There are other high-profile JRPG developers that have been constantly working on their craft, too. Bandai Namco and their Tales franchise are usually the ones held up in comparison to Square Enix’s offerings, but I’d be remiss if I didn’t bring up the work of Atlus during all of this. Anyone who stated that JRPGs were a dying breed needed only to look at the Persona and Shin Megami Tensei games to know that wasn’t the case.

Even Mistwalker Studios, formed by ex-Squaresoft veteran Hironobu Sakaguchi -- the creator of Final Fantasy -- has been going strong. Lost Odyssey and The Last Story were both very good games, though due to their exclusivity to certain consoles their audience has regrettably been smaller than deserved. Sakaguchi-san is hardly the only developer to have left Square Enix and gone on to continue making great RPGs outside of their banner.

Bored of the main quest? Start looking for side quests

The gaming landscape is only growing larger every day, with a broad library of titles available to explore across all sorts of platforms. Regardless of platform or where you look, however, the JRPG continues to thrive and expand. Whether nostalgia-laden throwbacks or cliched affairs to innovative twists on plots and mechanics, they’re there in force.

But just like for other genres, sometimes you need to look past the AAA developers of Square Enix to see it.

Think of it like the grand RPG tradition: sometimes you need to go off the beaten track and explore away from the main quest in order to find the truly valuable treasure. It’s the same in finding games to play. You might find something good to play amongst Square Enix’s offerings -- and there are some good titles from recent years, don’t get me wrong -- but the hidden gems can only be found by looking around, asking questions, and delving into the side quests of other developers in order to find something you truly love but rarely hear about.

Give it a shot. Forget the Final Fantasy series. Instead, go play Ys! Swap Dragon Quest VIII out of your 3DS in favour of Shin Megami Tensei IV: Apocalypse! Forget I Am Setsuna and try Trillion! Live a little, explore, and expand your horizons. Who knows, you might surprise yourself with what you find.

It’s not that unheard of for the main quest to be pretty bad in comparison to the side quests, anyway. Right, Final Fantasy XV?

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5 Exclusive Features We Want in Final Fantasy 15's PC Release https://www.gameskinny.com/h2gv2/5-exclusive-features-we-want-in-final-fantasy-15s-pc-release https://www.gameskinny.com/h2gv2/5-exclusive-features-we-want-in-final-fantasy-15s-pc-release Mon, 13 Feb 2017 08:00:01 -0500 Michael Llewellyn

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Shadow of the Colossus - A Boss Battle Gauntlet
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The Shadow Of The Colossus was basically a beautifully made gauntlet of giant boss battles. The boss battles in Final Fantasy XV were definitely a stand out part of the game, with the multi layered strategies needed to take them down. The fights were an epic sight to behold and even more fun to participate in. Maybe an extra hard post-game gauntlet mode where you fight the bosses in sequence a higher level for bonuses and experience points to carry over onto a new game plus.

\n

The open world nature of Final Fantasy XV can allow for quite a bit of flexibility on a machine powerful enough to run the game at full spec with extra game modes and features like mod support the possibilities are endless. Square-Enix have been playing it smart lately and a port with worthwhile features are a good way to breathe extra life into the game on a different platform without making PC players feel short changed due to a long wait for the port. There could also be some hope that some of these features would eventually make it over to the console versions too in the way of DLC which again could add more longevity there too.

\n

What features would you like to see make it on the eventual PC version? Let me know in the comments below.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/378bb9ee071c100158a124a10629b930.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/378bb9ee071c100158a124a10629b930.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"10349","description":"
Dark Souls 3 - Player VS Player Arena Mode
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The player vs player mode in Ashes of Ariandel DLC for Dark Souls 3 has proven to be a very popular addition for fans, and I think it would work especially well in Final Fantasy XV.

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It would like to see a similar mode where your characters are summoned to another plane of existence in a similar way to an Eidolon to do battle against another force of a similar nature. A mod that has proven very popular in Dark Souls 3 on the PC is the ability to do battle as one of the bosses you encounter in the game. Some of bosses in FFXV are huge so imagine the gargantuan battles of Godzilla sized proportions in an arena mode, it could be a great deal of fun.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/95211042f15bc5ee33b265b0acdbe711.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/95211042f15bc5ee33b265b0acdbe711.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"10346","description":"
Tales of Berseria - Local and Online Co-Op Battles
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The drop in and drop out local multiplayer battle system in the Tales series has always been a great addition to the series. The ability for someone other than yourself to jump in and you in your battles without needing to commit to the story is a great idea -- I found it a great way to get my kids into the series without having to worry too much about the complexities of the story.

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This idea would lend itself well in a battle system as fun and fast paced as Final Fantasy XV. Both locally with a split screen option and online. An online mode could work as a means of getting more experience points and extra items from helping others that you can take back to your own game -- A gameplay mechanic that worked so well in the Souls series.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/b2c745d3d13e7d9925bf5c0f66788137.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/b2c745d3d13e7d9925bf5c0f66788137.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"10348","description":"
Final Fantasy VIII - Triple Triad Card Game
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I would love to see an online or even an offline version of Triple Card Triad make return to the Final Fantasy universe. Or perhaps a mini game inspired by Gwent from The Witcher 3 which was so addictive and fun that it got its own game.

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I've always found the Triple Card Triad from Final Fantasy VIII to be both challenging and a fun side distraction from the main story, I remember becoming quite obsessive with it. I would love to see it implemented again in the FFXV as another way to get exclusive bonus items, recipes or weapons.

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Final Fantasy XV - Moogle Chocobo Carnival 
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This should be an easy one for Square-Enix to pull off. The Moogle Chocobo Carnival is completely wacky, tongue-in cheek and strange and that's a great thing because it's features like this that  epitomise what Final Fantasy is to a lot of fans.

\n

As a huge FInal Fantasy VII fan I loved the option to go The Golden Saucer when I felt like a break from the darkness that Sephiroth had began to unleash on the world. Which is why I think making the Moogle Chocobo Carnival a permanent edition to the PC version would be a good idea, rather than it being a timed event.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/i/n/final-fantasy-96c4d.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/i/n/final-fantasy-96c4d.jpg","type":"slide","id":"150298","description":"

Now that Final Fantasy XV director Hajime Tabata has announced plans to work on an eventual PC version of the game. The director at Square-Enix has already announced ambitions to add mod support and custom quests and given that FFXV will be made to run on a high end machine, features like higher resolution graphics and faster and more consistent frame rates should be a given. As well as a complete package that includes all the DLC for the extra wait.

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PC gamers will have a while to wait though, and at least until after all the DLC and extra content has been patched in, so in the meantime I will speculate and list off some features seen in other Japanese RPG's that could make a good addition to the PC version of FFXV.

"}]]]>
Tales of Berseria Guide: How to Solve the Door Puzzle in Palamides Temple https://www.gameskinny.com/nzdet/tales-of-berseria-guide-how-to-solve-the-door-puzzle-in-palamides-temple https://www.gameskinny.com/nzdet/tales-of-berseria-guide-how-to-solve-the-door-puzzle-in-palamides-temple Sat, 28 Jan 2017 12:39:22 -0500 Autumn Fish

Upon entering the second main area of Palamides Temple, players are greeted by a door with seven jewels embedded in a circular pattern upon its surface. There are three blue teardrop-shaped jewels and four white diamond shaped jewels.

Tales of Berseria asks you to light all seven of the jewels in order to unlock the door and proceed with the story. If you skimmed our Beginner's Guide, you know this is a sign the rest of the area is begging to be explored -- and you should do so, if you haven't already.

So you've searched the area top to bottom, broke a crumbling wall, looted chests behind a couple of waterfalls, discovered an amazingly skinny elevator thing, and returned to the door only to find the four white diamonds lit. Not even the singular blue teardrop that was glowing originally is lit anymore. What gives?

Well, as you might have guessed, the blue teardrops symbolize the water chalices that you've been messing with for some time now. The teardrops glow blue when their corresponding chalice is full. With this in mind, head out to refill the chalices you previously emptied.

Branch out into both of the side rooms and activate the chalices just at the top of the stairs. Once you return to the main doorway, you'll find that the left and right teardrops are both glowing. Just one more teardrop to go.

But it couldn't possibly be, could it? Not the chalice connected to the waterfall that lets you enter this very room. If you went out there and reactivated that chalice, there wouldn't be any possible way of getting back in, would there?

Actually, there is a hidden portal that you can use to sneak back into the central area, so you needn't worry about locking yourself out. Assuming you didn't lock the side-rooms behind waterfalls again by reactivating the wrong chalices, that is.

Head back out to the entry area and reactive the main chalice, locking you out of the door you just came through. Afterward, climb the stairway and head into the room on your right. There you'll find the portal that leads to a back corner of the western room in the central area.

Now when you head back out to the locked door you'll find all seven of the jewels glowing. Congratulations! The jeweled door has finally deemed you worthy enough to pass.

Curious about Tales of Berseria's Grade Shop? Stuck on another puzzle? Well, don't you seem the inquisitive type! Go ahead, leave us a comment -- we'll get back to you as soon as we can.

Best of luck on the rest of your adventures!

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Tales of Berseria - Grade Shop Guide https://www.gameskinny.com/tjlph/tales-of-berseria-grade-shop-guide https://www.gameskinny.com/tjlph/tales-of-berseria-grade-shop-guide Fri, 27 Jan 2017 07:58:10 -0500 Autumn Fish

The Grade Shop is back at full force in Tales of Berseria with the return of the Grading system of old. Instead of donating items like we did in Tales of Zerestria or collecting titles like Tales of XilliaBerseria returns to the series' roots of Grading the player off of their performance in battle.

For the uninitiated, the Grade Shop is where you go to purchase buffs and upgrades for your New Game Plus (NG+) playthrough. The shop becomes available after you finish the game.

Since the game doesn't entirely end after you finish it, you have the time to farm for Grade before heading into NG+. The best way to earn more Grade is to go out and battle a bunch of monsters. Going after boss monsters such as Code Red Daemons also grants a bonus to the amount of Grade you can get.

After finishing up in Palamides Temple, you receive the Marathoner's Ventite, which unlocks a Grade bonus for chaining battles together. The Grade bonus increases with successive battles. Note, however, that the chain breaks if a character dies, if you flee, or even if you save.

Additionally, playing on higher difficulties can net you more Grade per battle. However, if you perform poorly, it can also take away more Grade per battle, so be smart when choosing the difficulty you want to farm Grade on.

Grade Shop

The Grade Shop in Tales of Berseria offers a plethora of options for those wishing to get a leg-up on their NG+ playthrough. Unfortunately, we do not have access to official English names or descriptions at this time. What follows is a translated list of the Grade Shop from the Japanese version of the game.

However, rest assured knowing we'll update this list with official English names and descriptions -- alongside where to find the shop and how much total Grade you can earn -- as soon as we discover the Grade Shop for ourselves.

  • Library (0)
  • Title (50)
  • Shop Rank (100)
  • Equipment Mastery (400)
  • Artes Count (50)
  • Magic Wind Crystal (100)
  • Magic Ice / Ignis Crystal (100)
  • Magic Steel / Silver Crystal (100)
  • Cooking (50)
  • Expedition (50)
  • Katz Spirits (50)
  • Tales Coins (50)
  • Consumption Items (600)
  • Special Items (50)
  • Visual Items (50)
  • Herb Growth (1000)
  • Inventory Expansion (0)
  • Arte Acquisition Rate x2 (0)
  • Always Wandering (250)
  • Level Up Bonus (500)
  • Character Changer (500)
  • Half Experience (10)
  • Double Experience (0)
  • Triple Experience (3000)
  • Double Gald (0)
  • Build Drop (1300)
  • Strengthening Charge Half Price (0)
  • Double Grade (0)
  • HP + 1000 #1 (0)
  • HP + 1000 #2 (500)

Note: Anything that costs 0 Grade is free of charge, but you must still purchase it for the effects to carry onto NG+.

I did my best to modify the unofficial translation so it fits with what we know of the official English translation -- however, I left alone anything I was unsure on. For example, I feel like Visual Items is referencing Fashion, but I'm not 100% positive about that.

Tales of Berseria Grade Shop Guide NG+

Be sure to check back for our completed Grade Shop list once we get our hands on the official translation. How are you enjoying Tales of Berseria so far? Do you have any more tips or information to add to the Guide Shop discussion? Sound off in the comments below!

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Tales of Berseria Tips and Tricks - Beginner's Guide https://www.gameskinny.com/clmyf/tales-of-berseria-tips-and-tricks-beginners-guide https://www.gameskinny.com/clmyf/tales-of-berseria-tips-and-tricks-beginners-guide Wed, 25 Jan 2017 07:13:52 -0500 Autumn Fish

Get the most out of your first Tales of Berseria playthrough with these tips and tricks. In this beginner's guide, we cover everything from optimal equipment and arte usage to understanding the intricacies combat.

Lost? Don't know what to do?

Whether you're returning from a long break or simply lost, figuring out what your quest is couldn't be simpler. Holding R1 in the overworld displays your main objective. If you're not sure where to find it, open up the world map by first going through the Local Map (Square) and then pressing Triangle. There is a star over the zone that the main objective is found in.

Explore Every Nook and Cranny

Tales of Berseria reimburses the player who spends their time checking around every corner. You never know when the next corner is hiding that sweet new piece of equipment or Katz Box. Even when there's not a chest, you can be certain to find some sellable treasures or Katz Spirits for your trouble.

Tales of Berseria Tips and Tricks Beginner's Guide

Regularly Swap Out Your Equipment

Trust me, this isn't a reminder to always wear the best equipment you own. Rather, this is a reminder to constantly equip your characters with equipment that they haven't worn before. After a certain amount of battles with a piece of equipment on, the character masters it's main passive skill so that they benefit from it even without it equipped. Keep a constant eye on the mastery of your equipment and swap it out whenever applicable.

Regularly Rotate Your Artes

For the uninitiated, artes are the combat abilities assigned to the four face buttons on your controller. Much like equipment, Tales of Berseria rewards the player for the regular use of all of their artes. The more artes a character regularly uses, the more Blast Gauge (BG) they get at the end of every encounter. The more BG you get, the more often you can use powerful Mystic Artes.

Take the Time to Fight

This is the equivalent of saying "Don't run from Wild Pokemon battles." I shouldn't have to say it, but running from and avoiding encounters that aren't required is a sure way to dig yourself a shallow, underleveled grave. Now, you don't have to go out and destroy every enemy in a zone -- just remember to cut through your paths so you don't end up in a nasty situation later on.

Combat Tips

Tales of Berseria Combat Tips and Tricks Beginner's Guide

Enemy Weakness

Chances are, you already know all about exploiting enemy weaknesses. For example, if you start a combo out with an attack that an enemy is weak to and continue the combo with martial artes, the entire combo will hit the enemy's weakness. The only issue is figuring out enemy weaknesses in the first place.

Luckily, this isn't too much of a hassle. While in combat, hold R1 to pause the encounter and view an opponent's stats. From here you can see some basic information on weaknesses and resistances. For more information on the enemy, press the Circle button while holding R1.

Break Soul

I wouldn't blame you if you're hesitant to use Break Soul at all. After all, it reduces your Soul Gauge by one soul and passes it out amongst the enemy's team. As if that wasn't bad enough, it drains your health while active. However, if you take the time to learn how to use it, it can be a powerful tool in combat.

For starters, Velvet does more damage in Break Soul the lower her health is. If you're confident enough to not get hit, you can run around, smashing in faces with 1 HP. No matter what, the effects of Break Soul will never kill you. Alternatively, Break Soul can also be used for a quick heal. On activation, Break Soul heals about 10% of Velvet's health. If you deactivate Break Soul quickly with a Break Arte to keep the health drain from setting in, then it essentially acts as a quick and dirty heal.

Take the time to carefully explore the new Break Soul mechanic. In the right hands, Break Soul is nothing short of devastating.

And that wraps up our Tales of Berseria beginner's guide. Be on the lookout for our upcoming guides on Katz Boxes and Code Red Daemons. Have any more tips and tricks for Tales of newcomers? Leave them in the comments below!

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A Comprehensive List of 11 JRPGs Coming to the US This Year https://www.gameskinny.com/17qw8/a-comprehensive-list-of-11-jrpgs-coming-to-the-us-this-year https://www.gameskinny.com/17qw8/a-comprehensive-list-of-11-jrpgs-coming-to-the-us-this-year Tue, 07 Feb 2017 08:00:01 -0500 gbarber98

It's a good year for video games, with games like Resident Evil, Horizon Zero Dawn, and Zelda Breath of the Wild coming out. But what about those wonderful JRPGs which are finally making their way to the US, or which are releasing alongside their Japanese counterparts? Let me tell you about the JRPGs which are coming to the States this year.

1. Tales Of Berseria

Tales Of Berseria is set in a wasteland of a world, known as Glenwood, in the distant future. This is the first tales game with a lead protagonist named Velvet, who once was a kind hearted person turned to the path of revenge after a series of events which changed her life forever -- shock and horror. Now she is on a quest to destroy the balance of peace, and possibly destroy the world to quench her thirst for revenge -- which makes an interesting take on the tried and tested revenge motivation.

Tales of Berseria is available now for PS4, and PC.

2. Nioh

Nioh has been called a Samurai version of Dark Souls, due to Nioh being a dark, gritty, and mature action RPG. Player take control of Williams Adams, a real-life Western Samurai who existed in the 1600s at the end of Japan's Warring States Period. In Nioh you will hack, and slash everything in your way as you fight through the beautiful but twisted world. I love games that take the risk, reward method like that of the Souls games, and thoroughly challenge you.

Nioh was released on on February 7.

3. Persona 5

Persona 5 is one of the most stylish JRPG's coming out this year. This series has made so many fans over the years, from the PS2 era Persona games, to the animes, and even to the remake of Persona 4 on the PS Vita. The Persona series itself has always brought a unique take on JRPG's, thus making them totally traditional. What make this series special is in its relationships with in-game friends and family -- you hang with friends, and grow to become greater friends. Persona 5 really kicks it up a notch with vibrant contrasting colors, and a sleek UI -- the trailers are to be believed.

Persona 5 will be releasing on April 4 2017, for PS4.

 4. Neir Automata

Before playing the demo for Neir Automata I don't know much about the series, but after the demo I can tell you it's pretty damn good -- and so can many others. Neir Automata takes place in a time where humans have basically been wiped out, and the world has been taken over by robots. You will play though the game as a character simply named "2B." The perspective will seamlessly shift between a standard 3D, to 2D (well more 2.5D), to top down bullet hell style -- and it's not jarring at all.

Neir Automata is releasing on February 23 2017 for PS4, and PC later.

5. Summon Night 6 Lost Borders

Already out in Japan, Summon Night 6 will be coming to the States  in 2017, yet people here don't know much but the games. They are a unique blend of strategy RPG (reminiscent of Final Fantasy Tactics or Disgaea), and anime. They have also added a unique bonus of letting you choose not only your main character, but your main partner as well. This lets you customize your story the way that you want it to unfold.

Summon Night 6 is coming some time in 2017.

6. Dragon Quest XI

Dragon Quest XI is the next instalment in the Dragon Quest series. The game continues it's traditional gameplay, where player will traverse a open world full of monsters to fight. The Nintendo 3DS version of the game will show off a 3D art style, but players will be able to shift between 3D and 2D graphics on the fly.

Dragon Quest Xl will be releasing in Japan in 2017, while nothing has been said for a worldwide release. We do know that it is coming to Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo Switch, and PS4 so expect a US release date soon.

7. Final Fantasy Xll: The Zodiac Age

Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age is a remake of the original PS2 game released in 2006. The original FFXII added many systems to the Final Fantasy world that have been improved upon by future games, like the latest Final Fantasy XV. Fans will return to the world of Ivalice with a new HD look, while newcomers to the series will be able to see how it influenced FFXV.

FFXII will also feature the previously released (Japan only) Zodiac update. This features the ability to assign characters to different roles, thus giving each character unique skills and individual stat growth.

Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age will be releasing on July 11 for the PS4.

8. Xenoblade Chronicles 2

Xenoblade Chronicles 2 is a sequel to the first Xenoblade on the Wii. Xenoblade Chronicles 2 was announced at the Nintendo Switch event, and will be the first JRPG to make it to the Nintendo Switch. Despite being a sequel, it will not have the same main character as in first game, instead you will play as a new character who is searching the world for Elysium.

Xenoblade chronicle 2 will be releasing sometime in 2017.

9. Kingdom Hearts 3

Kingdom Hearts 3 is the next instalment of the Kingdom Hearts series. The game will continue the story of Kingdom Hearts 2, so to get ready, Kingdom Hearts 2.8 is available now, and it features a small piece is what is to come in the third installment.

Kingdom Hearts 3 does not yet have a release window, but the full HD collection of Kingdom Hearts series will release on March 28 2017.

10. Ni No Kuni 2

Ni No Kuni 2 is the sequel to the critically acclaimed Ni No Kuni. The game was announced at PSX 2016, with a incredible trailer showcasing the incredible world of Ni No Kuni, and it's amazing anime like look. This is a game I missed out on sadly, so hopefully they will make a remaster of the first game so people can play that before 2 releases. This game is one of the best looking games coming out in 2017, the only negative thing I have heard about the game is that they are removing familiars from the game, but other than that people are very excited.

Ni No Kuni 2 has not been given a fixed release date, but it is coming in 2017 for the PS4.

11. Final Fantasy VII

Final Fantasy VII is a remake of the original game for the PS1 made in 1997, it was was announced at E3 2015. FFVII will retell the story of ex-military Cloud Strife, as him, and eco terrorist group named AVALANCHE, fight against the Shinra megacorporation, and rouge soldier Sephiroth.

This game is still most likely a way of but we can hope to see something at E3 this year, or hopefully come out into 2017.

These games should be all coming out this year, except for any delays which can happen. If you have never played any type of JRPG's, you should start by playing Tales of Berseria which is available now, or look out for Nioh releasing on the 7th.

Have I missed out any JRPGs which are coming in 2017? Let me know in the comments below!

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5 JRPGs So Artistic They Make You Rethink the Genre https://www.gameskinny.com/lq6su/5-jrpgs-so-artistic-they-make-you-rethink-the-genre https://www.gameskinny.com/lq6su/5-jrpgs-so-artistic-they-make-you-rethink-the-genre Tue, 24 Jan 2017 06:46:28 -0500 gbarber98

JRPGs are called a lot of things, but rarely are they called "artistic". Many gamers look at their colorful and often cartoonish aesthetic, and dismiss them. But from Dragon Ball Xenoverse to the Persona series, all the way to franchises like the Ni No Kuni games, JRPGs have proven time and time again that they can look like grade-A anime.

But it's not just looks that elevate a game to artistic status. Immersive worlds and the creatures or characters you find in them add another layer of depth to a "pretty" game. Final Fantasy XV is a great example of this. Its humongous monsters were stunning to look at because of the amount of detail and care that went into their design. So even in situations where you knew you were in danger, you also found yourself in awe -- and that's what art does. 

But FFXV is just one instance of an artistic JRPG. Here are 5 others that -- either because of their design, their storytelling, their aesthetic, or any combination of the three -- can be called truly artful games. 

5. Tales of Berseria

What makes Tales Of Berseria so good is the world of Glenwood -- a wasteland set in the distant future filled with large lands and islands. The Northern and Southern hemisphere temperatures range from enduring winters to everlasting summers. As you play through this game, the world totally immerses you and has new beautiful things to see at every turn.

Playing through this game, you'll run into a lot of cutscenes. And during those scenes, it's easy to forget that you're not watching CrunchyRoll because of how smooth and anime-like they are.

Tales Of Berseria releases in North America on January 24th for the PS4.

4. Nioh

Nioh takes place in the 1600's in feudal era Japan, and showcases some amazing medieval architecture. But the real artistic feel comes from the enemies you fight in the game, known as Yokai. THese monsters are very grotesque, but weirdly beautiful at the same time. The game also has a great combat system -- strongly resembling the Souls and Ninja Gaiden series -- which is so smooth that it's almost like a dance.

Nioh will be releasing worldwide on February 9th, 2017.

3. I Am Setsuna

I Am Setsuna  has a great art style, as you can see above. It takes the aesthetic of old-school Chrono Trigger and Final Fantasy, and translates that into a beautiful, snow-blanketed setting. In the mostly white landscape, color becomes an important factor in the scenery and is even more vivid than it would be otherwise. And the magic animations are simply gorgeous, too.

I Am Setsuna is currently on PS4, but is also coming to the Nintendo Switch after the console releases in March.

2. Persona 4 Golden

Persona 4 Golden is one the best looking games on the PlayStation Vita. You play as a student who just moved to a new town, where a series of murders have been occurring. You and your new friends have to find out what's happening before things get worse.

The game looks incredible from start to finish, with its vivid characters and locations. And in some areas, the flawless bridging between the game and the anime is nothing short of artistic genius. 

1. Ni No Kuni

Ni No Kuni is a game about a boy named Oliver and his journey to another world to save his mother and stop a beckoning evil. This is another one that looks like a gorgeous anime you would watch on TV rather than a JRPG you'd play on a console. Many comparisons have been made between the aesthetic of this game and the beautiful animation of Studio Ghibli films.

This game is already available for a number of consoles and handheld systems, and its sequel -- Ni No Kuni II -- is set to release sometime in 2017.

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These are just some of the JRPGs which demonstrate the true artistry of the genre. There are many more I could have included here, and I'm sure that many of the JRPGs coming this year will also be great works of art. And I can't wait to see them.

Which JRPGs do you think have some serious artistic merit? Let us know in the comments below!

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Can't Play Tales of Berseria? Try These Tales of Games Instead https://www.gameskinny.com/hfpql/cant-play-tales-of-berseria-try-these-tales-of-games-instead https://www.gameskinny.com/hfpql/cant-play-tales-of-berseria-try-these-tales-of-games-instead Sun, 29 Jan 2017 12:55:48 -0500 BizarreAdventure

After a long (long wait), Tales of Berseria is finally out in the West. And while the jury is still out on if this newest installment of this storied franchise will, in fact, be the best game in the series, we can definitely talk about the games of the Tales of series that truly stand apart from the rest. So, if you haven't played Tales of Berseria yet (for whatever reason), here are some of the best games the franchise has to offer -- and that you can play right now. 

Tales of Zesteria

Okay so this one isn't exactly a good one that deserves your attention. I like playing a sequel game before a prequel if they were released in reverse order. Like Metal Gear Solid 1 and 2 being released before 3. That kind of stuff really tickles my fancy. The only problem is that Zesteria isn't actually a good game really. It's filled with bad mechanics, obvious cut content and a largely unlikable cast of characters. I'm only putting it here because it's the most directly related to Berseria.

So my suggestion is either just try to blaze through it, ignoring side content trying to make the experience as short as possible. Or if you have a Let's Player you enjoy who did a run of it, check that out before jumping in to Berseria. All of this is a moot point if you like chronology though and want to see the story from the beginning.

Tales of Symphonia

The first 3D Tales of game and one of the best in my opinion. This is for many people the Final Fantasy VII of Tales games. Do you like vast over worlds, action rpg combat with a slightly turn-based feel, a large cast of enjoyable and all uniquely important characters and a story just as good to go with them? This game has all of that. Plus it's on multiple consoles and was recently ported to PC. So it's easy to get hold of.

This is probably one of the best ones to play if you haven't. Many things you learn in this game will carry over to the others. That's not entirely a good thing though. It can make successive games feel a bit stale though. So take this opinion with a grain of salt.

Tales of Vesperia

Vesperia is a more "mature," Tales of game. This is the one I've put the most hours in to. This is because of the game play alone. It's easily the most solid in the series. I'm going to be completely honest though, the major aspects of the story are very disappointing. Minor stories, characters and the like are very solid. The problems is with how obvious the true villain of the story is. It kind of destroys any sense of surprise when you meet him in the second town like area and the first thing he says is something along the lines of,

"Humans are such filthy creatures."

Okay Badguy McLastBoss, chill. Oh also one of the playable characters is a wolf(?) who smokes a pipe and uses a sword. How cool is that?

Tales of Graces

I haven't actually played this one myself. I do have a friend who put about 250 hours into it though. I trust the guy so this one's probably pretty good. 

All of the others

I haven't played all of the Tales of games. Nor do I actually plan on playing all of them. Some just don't interest me, simple as that. But who am I to say you shouldn't play them? Go check out some of them yourself. Finding them is only a Google search away!

What's your favorite Tales of game? Why do you think it's the best? Let me know in the comments!

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The "Tales of" Series and Why I'm Worried for Its Future https://www.gameskinny.com/oujad/the-tales-of-series-and-why-im-worried-for-its-future https://www.gameskinny.com/oujad/the-tales-of-series-and-why-im-worried-for-its-future Tue, 17 Jan 2017 03:00:01 -0500 BizarreAdventure

Back when I was a young'n I was introduced to the JRPG genre relatively late. One of my favorites however, was Tales of Symphonia. I didn't play a Final Fantasy game until 5th or 6th grade and it wasn't until high school that I found out about the Tales of series. When I did happen upon the series, I had blasted my way through just about every mainline Final Fantasy game, and found the Tales of series provided a wonderful change of pace while still satisfying my new found JRPG itch.

The Tales of series isn't doing so hot though. Each game feels like a copy and paste of the previous one in terms of style and mechanics. Almost every game has you starting out as a swordsman protagonist each with very similar, or exactly the same move sets.

The same can be said for later characters as well. Casters have largely the same spell pool, a character will be introduced who excels in aerial combat, etc. This is repeated in each game. Beyond combat, they introduce the sorcerer's ring in almost every game as well. The sorcerer's ring being an out of combat magic blast used to give power to, or move objects from a distance. This detracts from the amount of creativity and differences in puzzles between the games. Even the games that try to fix it like Tales of Hearts R, which added multiple modes to the ring, only use them for one or two sections. Afterwards they're seemingly forgotten. 

The only things that ever feel different are the stories. Which is kind of a given, but even that aspect of the series has been feeling a bit rehashed as of late. Previous entries were self contained epics. Tales of Symphonia for instance starts as a tale about a pilgrimage to restore the planet's mana, an energy source that is needed both for magic and to support life itself.

Along the way though you find out that there is a cost that must be paid in order to do so. The more recent games however, start of with nice self contained stories about beings who control elements, stopping the destruction of the planet. Then they get largely unnecessary direct sequels. Making it seem like the creators have given up on making each game take place in it's own grand setting. Opting to reuse the previous one.

All of this recycling makes it seem like the series is desperately trying to cut costs. After Tales of Symphonia many of the games had an abundance of reused assets. Mainly when it comes to consumable items, but even some NPC's are identical. As time went on though it got worse. When they make a direct sequel, they have an excuse to use almost all of the same locations from its predecessor. 

Basically, it seems to me that the company producing the games has hit a happy equilibrium. The series has started to cut corners to turn as much of a profit as possible. Why make the effort to produce top quality content when mediocre makes more money? I understand that as a company that have to operate in ways that aren't always in the benefit of the consumer. But seeing a little more effort put into the series would be appreciated.

Many of my worries for the series as a whole hit their peak with Tales of Zestiria. Between the bland additions to combat mechanics, a majorly unlikable cast of characters and glaringly obvious cut content the game feels rushed and wholly not fun. Now Tales of Berseria is just around the corner for western release. I've done everything I can to go into it blind. Admittedly though I don't have high hopes for it due to what I do know of the game's story being a prequel to the extremely underwhelming Tales of Zesteria and the characters appearances.

Hopefully all my worries for the series and its future can be squashed after playing Tales of Berseria though. I've always loved the series for it's fast paced, sometimes strategic action RPG playstyle and world building. I would love for it to prove my cynicism wrong so I can enjoy another game in a childhood favorite series.

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Tales of Berseria Demo Now Available https://www.gameskinny.com/rmgus/tales-of-berseria-demo-now-available https://www.gameskinny.com/rmgus/tales-of-berseria-demo-now-available Tue, 10 Jan 2017 14:27:09 -0500 Michael Llewellyn

Ahead of the full game release on January 4 (PS4) and January 27 (PC/Steam),  the demo version of the upcoming Bandai-Namco RPG Tales of Berseria has been made available on PSN and Steam for PC in both North America and Europe.

Game Features
  • Fight alongside 5 comrades and unravel their secrets and skills
  • Set out and explore the stunning, ever-changing landscapes of Midgand Kingdom 
  • Feed on the strength of your enemies and strike with this evolved battle system
  • Discover even more of the world with side-quests and fun mini-games 

Pre-orders for the game will receive a 15 minute skit. While on Steam, customers who pre-order for PC will have a 10% discount on either Tales of Zesteria or Tales of Symphonia.  PSN pre-orders will gain a Tales of Berseria theme and receive three soundtracks.  

While there will be very early game spoilers, it's a good opportunity to see what improvements and changes have been made to the combat system.

Will you be picking up the demo or just waiting for the full game release?  Let us know in the comments below.

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My 5 Most Anticipated Japanese RPGs of 2017 https://www.gameskinny.com/nusb3/my-5-most-anticipated-japanese-rpgs-of-2017 https://www.gameskinny.com/nusb3/my-5-most-anticipated-japanese-rpgs-of-2017 Wed, 11 Jan 2017 07:00:02 -0500 Michael Llewellyn

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Final Fantasy VII Remake

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Playstation 4
TBA 2017
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Like many others at the time Final Fantasy VII was my introduction to the Japanese RPG and still remains my favourite game of all time. Whilst I accept its flaws, FFVII was the first game where I felt connected and invested in the story and characters of a videogame. Of course other games have come along since and before that are considered better on many levels and call it nostalgia if you will but Final Fantasy VII will always be number one in heart. So naturally a remake from the ground up on current systems will always nail my most anticipated games list.

\n

I'm not even sure the Final Fantasy VII Remake will make Western shores this year but I'm cautiously optimistic with 2017 being the 20 year anniversary of the original games release we'll at least see a demo. The remake will be split into three parts but individually be full games not unlike the original Mass Effect trilogy. Although there is some negativity toward the story being split into three episodes, I see it as positive as it not only allows Square-Enix to expand the original story and fill in some of the gaps in the story and potentially give us a bigger game but take on board any criticisms and improve with each subsequent episode.

\n

After seemingly pulling off the impossible with Final Fantasy XIV Reborn and Final Fantasy XV I have every bit of confidence they'll give us something special with the FFVII remake.

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Do you think my JRPG game is weak? Or are you equally as excited for these titles as I am? What would you have liked to see on this list? Let me know in the comments below.

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Persona 5 

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Playstation 4
March 2017
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The often delayed Persona 5 will finally see our shores this year and I have a feeling it will be well worth the wait.  Continuing the tradition of a dark tale set in a modern day Tokyo the game will feature the usual silent protagonist transferring to a new school with building social alliances being a key aspect of the gameplay.  Although not my most anticipated game on this list I do think Persona 5 will likely the best in terms of story and character development as evidenced by previous entries in the series.

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Tales of Berseria

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Playstation 4
January 2017
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The Tales series has been one of my favourite in the Japanese rpg genre since Tales of Symphonia on the Nintendo Gamecube so this was always going to be on my most anticipated radar.

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Tales of Berseria is another flagship entry in the long running Tales series.  Set in the distant past long prior to the events of Tales of Zesteria. The story now centres around Velvet a demon-pirate who is looking to be one of the most interesting protagonists in the series since Yuri from Tales of Vesperia. Fans of the series will know what to expect with the action based battle system, though it has undergone some significant changes via mapping the actions to the face buttons.

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NieR: Automata

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Playstation 4, Windows
March 2017
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One of the most surprising announcements for the me this generation currently was PS3/Xbox 360 title Nier getting any kind of sequel at all.  The original wasn't a critical or a commercial success but fans found through it's often clunky gameplay and odd design choices a true gem with an excellent story and one of the most beautiful soundtracks I've heard in a videogame composed by a returning Keiichi Okabe.

\n

One of the Niers biggest issues though was the combat system whilst functional it was at times clunky, slow and awkward. Thankfully though Square-Enix has brought in Platinum Games -- of the Bayonetta series along with Metal Gear Rising, Vanquish and Madworld -- who often hailed as some of the best action games developers around.

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Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King

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Nintendo 3DS
January 2017
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Originally a 2005 Playstation 2 title, Dragon Quest VIII was the first title in the series I played.  Originally just purchased for the Final Fantasy XII demo it came packaged with, I personally loved the game but it did have the drawback of being very long winded and grindy so I never quite got to see the post game content.  Being a grindfest is perfectly suited to the 3DS with the ability to play in smaller parts and on the go.  It's a massive game, with charming characters and a lot of fun with a timeless cell-shaded visual style so I'm very much looking forward to diving into this all over again.  If only I can prize the house 3DS away from my two young sons who are currently obsessed with Pokemon Sun.

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It's that time of the year again where, as gamers, we start preparing for the biggest releases in our favourite genres. One of my favourite genres is the Japanese RPG, and even with my lack of time through the curse of getting older and trying to be more responsible, I always try and fit a few JRPGs in -- or at the very least add to an ever growing backlog of games that I'd probably need two lifetimes to complete.

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Despite there being a slow start for JRPGs this generation -- beyond handheld titles -- 2017 looks to be a big year with a number of confirmed titles. So I have narrowed it down to my five most anticipated.

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Update: I've added an Anticipated Western RPG list too.

"}]]]>
5 JRPGs You Should Be Looking Forward to More Than Final Fantasy XV https://www.gameskinny.com/50w9r/5-jrpgs-you-should-be-looking-forward-to-more-than-final-fantasy-xv https://www.gameskinny.com/50w9r/5-jrpgs-you-should-be-looking-forward-to-more-than-final-fantasy-xv Fri, 04 Nov 2016 04:26:48 -0400 Pablo Seara

2017 promises to be one of the best years for the JRPG genre. Many will argue that this year was still very good, specially with the imminent arrival of Final Fantasy XV. However, there are many upcoming role-playing games from Japan that you should be expecting more than Square Enix's over-hyped title.

For those JRPG lovers out there, here you will find five of the most promising titles of the genre for the next year.

5. Valkyria: Azure Revolution

Developer: Media.Vision

Platform/s: PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita

Release Date: Early 2017

Valkyria: Azure Revolution is the spin-off of the excellent and highly underrated Valkyria Chronicles, one of the best JRPGS from the last generation. It is an action role-playing game with a strong emphasis in strategy. The story revolves around war in a fictional 20th Century setting -- similar to its predecessor -- and a race of demigods known as Valkyria. Characters can die permanently, like in Fire Emblem, demanding careful planning and maneuvering to achieve victory without casualties. 

Valkyria: Azure Revolution marks the return of the franchise to stationary consoles, after the last two games were released for the PSP. The game releases on January 19 in Japan and Sega has promised to bring the game to the West soon.

 4. Ni-Oh

Developer: Team Ninja

Platform/s: PlayStation 4

Release Date: Feb. 9, 2017

Ni-Oh is a PS4-exclusive action JRPG, heavily inspired by Dark Souls. It shares many similarities with FromSoftware's franchise, including its challenging gameplay, impressive bosses and dark atmosphere. However, Ni-Oh stands on its own with a world based on feudal Japan and filled with beasts, demons and supernatural entities from Japanese folklore.

Ni-Oh emphasizes ki (Dark Souls' stamina) as the main core of its gameplay, even more so than FromSoftware's games. Players can destabilize or break the defense of enemies -- but they can do the same, forcing us to keep a constant eye on our ki bar. You'll also have the ability of taking three different stances with the same weapon, adding more possibilities to the combat system.

3. Tales of Berseria

 

Developer: Bandai Namco

Platform/s: PlayStation 4, PC

Release Date: Jan. 24 (PS4), Jan. 27 (PC)

For those who are not familiar with the series, Tales of is an anime-looking JRPG series that remains constant in its quality over the years. Tales of Berseria takes place thousands of years before Tales of Zestiria, the last entry in the franchise. The combat system will be more dynamic than ever, as well as the world, which promises to be more open.

It is the first time the franchise will feature a solo female protagonist: Velvet, a 19-year-old girl that can transform her left arm into a demon claw. The story will be darker than usual, revolving around vengeance and the conflict between reason and emotion. 

2. NieR: Automata

Developer: Platinum Games

Platform/s: PlayStation 4, PC

Release Date: Early 2017

NieR: Automata is the unexpected sequel to the cult game NieR, created by the fallen development studio Cavia. This time, Platinum Games will be the ones in charge of the franchise, adding their personal touch to the title: excellent action-oriented gameplay, astonishing battle effects and original art style. 

NieR is remembered for its complex story, great characters and amazing soundtrack; and despite its mixed reviews, that's something Platinum Games will try to emulate with this new title. NieR: Automata doesn't have a concrete release date yet, but it is expected for the first months of next year.

1. Persona 5

 

Developer: Atlus

Platform/s: PlayStation 3 (only Japan), PlayStation 4, PC

Release Date: Feb. 14, 2017

Finally, one of the most awaited games of one of the best franchises, Persona 5. We will be able to play this gem on Valentine's day, exploring a game that mixes traditional role-playing with real-life simulation. Persona has managed to grow over the years and cultivate a large amount of fans, thanks to the depth and charisma of its characters, its traditional, yet modern combat system, and its original soundtrack, among many other characteristics.

Persona 5 takes place in Tokyo and, as in previous games, our main protagonist will be a transfer student. We will meet new friends and live a double life as a member of the Phantom Thieves -- a group of heroes that can use their Personas, powerful manifestations of their own psyche, which can only be activated by accepting your own self.

Which upcoming JRPGs are you most excited for? Let us know in the comments below!

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Tales Of Berseria Release Dates Announced in the West https://www.gameskinny.com/akox8/tales-of-berseria-release-dates-announced-in-the-west https://www.gameskinny.com/akox8/tales-of-berseria-release-dates-announced-in-the-west Tue, 11 Oct 2016 05:02:34 -0400 Michael Llewellyn

Bandai Namco announced yesterday via their blog the Western release dates for both the PS4 and the steam versions of Tales Of Berseria, the latest flagship title in the long-running Japanese RPG Tales series. The PS4 version will be released in the US on the 24th of January 2017, with Europe getting it three days later on the same day as the Steam version on the 27th of January 2017.  

Bandai Namco also announced a pre-order collector's edition, of which there will only be 10,000 numbered units in circulation. The blog lists the number of included collectables and are as follows:

  • Tales of Berseria game
  • The Collector’s Edition box
  • 2 Chibi Kyun characters figures (Laphicet and Velvet)
  • 3 Metal Coins
  • Exclusive Bienfu metal case (to complete your Mascots metal case collection)
  • Game soundtrack
  • Artbook
  • Starter strategy guide

Depending on which retailer you order through, pre-orders of the regular PS4 edition of Tales Of Berseria will get you either 6 pin badges or a metal keychain as pictured below.

Will you be pre-ordering the game? Let me know in the comments below!

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New Tales of Berseria Ad Released On Official Site https://www.gameskinny.com/3zh6t/new-tales-of-berseria-ad-released-on-official-site https://www.gameskinny.com/3zh6t/new-tales-of-berseria-ad-released-on-official-site Thu, 26 May 2016 08:15:36 -0400 cactusjudy

Bandai Namco Entertainment has released a new ad for Tales of Berseria on the game's official website. The short video, which is in Japanese, is centered on the game's protagonist, Velvet Crowe and also features the game's theme song, "BURN" by FLOW. 

Tales of Berseria will take place in the fictional Midgand Sacred Kingdom, which is located in the same world as a previous Tales title, Tales of Zestiria. The game will follow Velvet (voiced by Rina Satou), a 19-year-old pirate, and her spirit companion Laphicet (voiced by Azumi Asakura). Other revealed characters include Rokuro Rangetsu (voiced by Daisuke Kishio), Eleanor Hume (voiced by Ami Koshimizu), Magilou (voiced by Satomi Satou), Bienfu (voiced by Naomi Nagasawa), and Eizen, a pirate and rival to Velvet also known as the God of Death (voiced by Toshiyuki Morikawa). 

Tales of Berseria will be released in Japan for PlayStation 4 and PlayStation 3 on August 18, and in North America and Europe in early 2017. The first-print limited edition of the game will include a serial code for special video chat between the cast members of the game, called "Special Dramatic Chat ~Melon Gumi-hen~," which translates to English as "Melon Gel Chapter." The digital download edition of the game will also include a special theme illustration by ufotable. It is not yet known if these extras will be included in the North American and European releases of the game.  

 

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9 JRPGs to look forward to in 2016 https://www.gameskinny.com/sgh4a/9-jrpgs-to-look-forward-to-in-2016 https://www.gameskinny.com/sgh4a/9-jrpgs-to-look-forward-to-in-2016 Thu, 24 Mar 2016 08:59:50 -0400 Ashley Shankle

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Persona 5
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Platforms: PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4
Release date: 2016 (Summer)

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It's been how long since we've gotten a new mainline Persona game? Eight years? It's about time we finally got a new one, isn't it?

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The Shin Megami Tensei spin-off series Persona exploded with the release of Persona 3 on the PlayStation 2 and only garnered more attention and fans with the fourth entry to the series. Both the third and fourth Persona games are considered some of the best JRPG gaming on the PlayStation 2, if not ever (by some).

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Persona 5 has been added to a lot of wishlists over the years -- and it's almost time, with the game's rumored release date sitting in Summer this year. It's not far now, and with the game's overall style leaning more toward Catherine than the PS2 games and the return of Social Links, we're sure to be in for a treat on all counts.

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7th Dragon III Code: VFD
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Platform: Nintendo 3DS
Release date: July 12

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A turn-based RPG with combat akin to a dungeon crawler, a base-building feature, and.. dating? Let's have at it!

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7th Dragon III Code: VFD is the first in the previously Japan-only series 7th Dragon to make it to the West, and it promises to be more expansive than its predecessors, with loads of features and some top-notch visuals for the Nintendo 3DS.

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Rumor from Japanese fans is that this is a relatively easy game -- which is great for anyone not familiar with difficult modern dungeon crawlers like Etrian Odyssey. 7th Dragon III Code: VFD looks to make up for the lack of (supposed) combat difficulty with extra features, like being able to date your party members and build a base.

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We don't get a ton of SEGA RPGs these days, and this series is popular in Japan. Hopefully this will partially quench the dungeon crawling thirst while we wait for an Etrian Odyssey 5 localization.

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Final Fantasy 15
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Platform: PlayStation 4
Release date: TBA 2016

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It's hard not to add an upcoming Final Fantasy game to this list considering the infrequency of mainline entries to the series and how iconic it is, but I'd be lying if I said I wasn't pensive about it after Square Enix has spent so many resources on Final Fantasy 13's spin-offs and trying sell us Lightning.

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But I digress: Final Fantasy 15 is coming this year and regardless of whether you're a classic or modern Final Fantasy fan, it's something to be excited about.

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Final Fantasy 15 has been in development for the gaming industry-equivalent of an eternity and as with the past few iterations to the series it's changing up the battle system and world from its predecessors. It's bound to be full-on gorgeous and massive, two adjectives JRPG fans rarely see together these days.

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Fingers crossed to 15 being the Final Fantasy we've been waiting for, and that it signals the end of (or at least lessens) Square Enix's Lightning obsession.

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Bravely Second: End Layer
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Platform: Nintendo 3DS
Release date: April 15

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Handhelds are where it's at for more traditional turn-based RPGs these days, and Bravely Default did an astounding job of bringing a new classic Final Fantasy-style experience packed with job classes, charm, and an engaging battle system to the modern market without being too derivative of Square Enix's flagship series.

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Bravely Second: End Layer promises to bring that successful mix of old and new back, and judging by some reviews from Europe's earlier release it seems to fulfill that promise. North American Nintendo 3DS owners will be able to get their hands on this baby soon enough.

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Nights of Azure
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Platform: PlayStation 4
Release date: March 29

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Nights of Azure isn't your typical Gust-developed fare. Combat is action-oriented and smooth, the world isn't bright and cheerful, and it's not 50% "cute girls doing cute things" -- but it's Gust. It's not going to be triple-A quality.

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Regardless, Nights of Azure should be on the shopping list of most action JRPG fans, with the game primarily focused on the button-mashing action. It's a Gust game, so expect lots of same-sex implications between the two female characters.

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There really isn't much else to say here, but this is definitely a candidate to fill the action JRPG void in the first half of 2016.

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Dragon Quest VII: Fragments of the Forgotten Past
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Platform: Nintendo 3DS
Release date: Summer 2016

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The Dragon Quest doesn't sell amazingly here in North America, but that doesn't mean we can't get at least some games in the series. Square Enix apparently agrees to some extent, with Dragon Quest 7 and 8 getting localized Nintendo 3DS ports this year.

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While Dragon Quest 8 is certainly a stellar game and very much worth the purchase, Dragon Quest 7 is no release to scoff at either. The game's initial North American release on the PlayStation was met with a lukewarm reception, in large part due to its two hour introduction with no action whatsoever and dated graphics for the time.

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The long, boring introduction has been cut from the port and new content added, meaning Dragon Quest 7 will finally be more accessible to the less-than-determined crowd.

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Dragon Quest 7 one of the longest games in the series and is an absolutely touching and expansive adventure. If you've never given it a shot, it's more than worth picking up once the Nintendo 3DS version releases later this year.

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NieR: Automata
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Platform: PlayStation 4
Release date: TBA 2016

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Director Taro Yoko's NieR was the definition of a modern day "sleeper hit", with much reviewer reception being lukewarm while the game itself garnered a dedicated and obsessive fanbase, and for good reason.

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NieR was and is most certainly a spin-off of Drakengard, a little-known action RPG series known more for its ability to confuse and disgust its players than delight them. NieR itself is very unique, meshing a variety of features together one really would expect with a story that's hard to forget.

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NieR: Automata's announcement last year was a massive surprise, not only because it was unexpected but because of its developer: Platinum Games.

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If you play Japanese games, you know Platinum -- the studio absolutely knocks it out of the park when it comes to action-oriented games. With Yoko Taro and Platinum working together, it's hard to imagine NieR: Automata not being everything fans could want and more.

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Tales of Berseria
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Platforms: PlayStation 4, PC
Release date: TBA 2016

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Perhaps the release most fitting to come after Star Ocean in the list is Tales of Berseria. After all, the first entries to both series were worked on by much of the same development team and both have maintained their own action battle systems through the years.

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The Tales of Berseria looks to be a more series entry to the series compared to last year's Tales of Zestria. And once again, the battle and skill systems are changing, tossing out the SC system from Zestria and even the old TP system for something called the Soul Gauge.

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A new Tales of release is always welcome, even if the series has some serious ups and downs. There's certainly something to be said of the sense of adventure the Tales of games still give today, and we're getting more of them than ever. Let's just cross our fingers that Berseria's combat isn't disappointing.

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STAR OCEAN: Integrity and Faithlessness
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Platform: PlayStation 4
Release date: Summer 2016

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I don't think I would have bet on 2016 being the year a new Star Ocean would be released, but it's turned out to be -- over seven years after Star Ocean: The Last Hope saw its initial release on the Xbox 360.

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Integrity and Faithlessness will be the fifth mainline entry to the Star Ocean series -- and developer Tri-Ace and music composer Motoi Sakuraba are back at it again for Square Enix's sci-fi fantasy action RPG series. It just wouldn't be the same without them, right?

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Fans are hoping this fifth entry will bring Star Ocean's (sort of) glory days back, and it just very well might. The game has so far been revealed to have six simultaneous party members, a fast-paced action battle system, and the return of the Private Action, event, and item creation features fans of the series have come to expect.

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Hype for this game is so far lukewarm, which is understandable considering the polarizing opinions of the third and fourth games. Here's to hoping Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness goes above and beyond the fanbase's expectations.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/fl_lossy,q_80/c_limit,f_auto,h_360,w_640/v1/gameskinnyc/j/r/p/jrpgs-header-57781.png","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/fl_lossy,q_80/c_limit,f_auto,h_85,w_97/v1/gameskinnyc/j/r/p/jrpgs-header-57781.png","type":"slide","id":"108672","description":"

Regardless of the whispers from your circle of friends and the general gaming climate in the West, JRPGs are far from a dead sub-genre. What used to be one of the largest chunks of console gaming now makes up only a fraction of the industry's earnings, but that doesn't mean developers aren't still hammering out new titles that are worth paying attention to.

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2016 is set to be one of the larger years for Japanese-developed RPGs in recent memory, with several titles making their way West from both large and small developers. This year features a number of older series continuing to push forward and new IPs trying to make their name among one of gaming's most difficult crowds.

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All of the games we're going to feature in this list are slated for a North American release sometime this year, though some of their exact release dates are yet to be announced. Nonetheless, if you're a fan of JRPGs, you can take solace in the fact there are so many options to choose from in 2016.

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New details on Tales of Berseria https://www.gameskinny.com/s0zqs/new-details-on-tales-of-berseria https://www.gameskinny.com/s0zqs/new-details-on-tales-of-berseria Fri, 26 Jun 2015 05:21:49 -0400 Sam Yoo

Bandai Namco has released new promotional material on the Tales of Berseria website such as the concept art of Velvet, the protagonist, new screenshots, and more information about the game.

The world of Tales of Berseria

The game takes place in Midgand - the Holy Empire that spans the entire ocean. Several larger islands and an infinite number of smaller archipelagos are all unified as 'territory' under the jurisdiction of the empire.  

Even though they are part of the same kingdom, the north and the south are totally different temperatures.

The differences in climate have also influenced the native cultures.  From the style of the buildings to the people's lifestyles, culture varies from territory to territory. In recent years, however, the whole world has become colder -  especially the northern region, which is being buried in snow.

With the advances of ship building and sailing technology in the Midgand Holy Empire, trade and commerce is being actively conducted everywhere. Because the weather and ocean currents are so intense, trade ships are forced to use specific routes that are frequently targeted by pirates.

With snow-covered towns, eternal summer islands, autumn foliage, and evening suns, this game promises to have more diverse environments for the player to explore.

The Protagonist - Velvet

  • Gender:  Female
  • Age:  19
  • Height:  170cm

Velvet used to be an ordinary young girl with an openhearted personality, great sensitivity, and a love for her family.

However, an incident that took place three years ago caused a complete change in her.  She has just about lost the ability to smile.  Instead, she carries cold emotions, like fury and hatred, with her.

I won't give up.  I'll give them hell, however many times it takes.  

No matter what lies on the path ahead...         --Velvet

Now she is a woman that keeps her true gentle nature suppressed inside while she burns with cold fury.  Before long, she will become the existence that shakes the world.

Tales of Berseria will be available for both the PlayStation 3 and PS4.  The Japanese release date is still not yet determined.

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