7 Forgotten Video Games in Desperate Need of a Sequel

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While many publishers often don't have second thoughts about flooding the market with annual revisions of their most commercially viable franchise, not every publisher takes that path. Some games are forgotten and their legacy, however big or small, neglected and swept under the metaphorical rug.

However, some fans are persistent and vocal enough to bring old IPs -- or even whole series -- back to life; Shenmue I & II HD serves as an excellent example of such dedication. Other, less fortunate titles are forever ignored, without merely a hint of a potential resurrection.

These unfortunate outcasts are mostly kept alive by loyal fans who express their appreciation of a particular video game or franchise via cosplay, music, and original artworks, for example.

There is a valid argument to be made that some stories should remain singular; developing a sequel would just complicate things. However, if certain titles receive the privilege of being released annually, then even a one-off follow-up to any of these entries wouldn't hurt, especially given their prolonged absence.

This compilation is comprised of games which have to date had only one official main entry and not released for at least five years.

Click "Next" on the bottom-right to view these games in alphabetical order.

Alan Wake

One of the strongest exclusives on the Xbox 360, even though it was later released for Microsoft Windows, Alan Wake masterfully combines ideas from series like Silent Hill and the vibe of TV shows such as Twin Peaks into a terrifying whole.

It follows the story of an acclaimed writer who is going through a creative crisis and decides to take a break by going on a vacation with his loving wife. A potentially romantic getaway quickly turns south as grisly events from a mysterious book written by Alan -- unbeknown to himself -- begin to unfold.

A sequel was in development but got canceled due to the first game's slightly underwhelming commercial performance, which was partially attributed to a high rate of piracy.

That said, the game has amassed a devout following and Alan Wake 2 is not necessarily out of the question.

(Please note: Alan Wake's American Nightmare is not regarded as a sequel. It is instead a DLC.)

Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem

An unusual title released exclusively on the GameCube was made even more unusual when taking Nintendo's generally family-friendly ecosystem into context. Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem is an M-rated horror game and, more importantly, pretty darn good at that.

At its core, it's very much like any classic Resident Evil title, especially given its third-person perspective and "tank controls". The concept is kept fresh by an intriguing story, featuring multiple playable characters across numerous historical periods and a unique Sanity mechanic.

The sanity meter, upon reaching a certain threshold, would not only affect a character's composure but sometimes also simulate a lifelike failure of the console's hardware: in a very Kojima-esque manner.

A canceled sequel was in development and a spiritual successor titled Shadow of the Eternals is, allegedly, still in the works.

Nintendo owns the rights to the original name, so it's anyone's guess if it will officially return. But with the Switch seemingly embracing some aspects of the Mature genre in titles like Doom, there is hope. 

Extermination

There's more than horror games on this list, I promise.

This title went widely unnoticed by the general gaming community and was received by the critics with lukewarm fanfare. Nonetheless, it provided a more than decent survival-horror experience on the PlayStation 2.

The player controls Dennis Riley, a U.S. Marine who, together with his partner Roger, must infiltrate a secret research base in Antarctica after receiving a distress signal. Extermination plays out similarly to other games in the genre, such as Dino Crisis and Resident Evil.

The game features a predictable storyline and a glut of cheesy dialogue, but it's redeemed by great sound design and atmosphere, heavily resembling John Carpenter's movie The Thing.

It was among the first titles on PlayStation 2 and was used to showcase the console's capabilities, therefore selling reasonably well for the time. Alas, a sequel is highly unlikely, though one can dream.

God Hand

Unfortunately for God Hand, it was a game released late into the sixth console generation. This amazing brawler hit the store shelves in the U.S. during October 2006 -- a mere month before the launch of the PlayStation 3.

God Hand is all about over-the-top action and humor, mind-boggling, thumb-twitching combos, and a complete disregard for the laws of physics. It helps the game has a wide assortment of incredible boss battles -- almost all of which Western players should have the privilege of experiencing.

Its "mediocrity" was met with little critical acclaim, at least initially. Since its release, however, the game has garnered a lot of positive attention and is included in many noteworthy compilations (such as this one ^_^).

Given the poor sales, a sequel is unlikely. But perhaps Capcom will provide Gene -- the game's main protagonist -- another chance. The original is available for download on PSN.

Haunting Ground

Another great, off-the-radar title by Capcom.

Despite being a spiritual successor to Clock Tower 3, Haunting Ground can very well stand on its own. Largely thanks to its gripping plot, eerie atmosphere, and its in-your-face "Peeping Tom" nature.

It tells a story about Fiona, an 18-year-old girl who finds herself imprisoned in a castle, with barely any memories on how she got there. She is subsequently chased by various terrifying inhabitants of the castle and befriends a dog named Hewie, who aids her in the quest of a successful escape.

Much like God Hand, this title did not sell too well and was met with a diverse range of critical responses.

Nevertheless, the game's positive aspects were highly praised and it has since developed a loyal fanbase which no doubt hopes for a sequel in the not-too-distant future.

Mini Ninjas

A surprisingly great game published by Eidos Interactive in 2009, Mini Ninjas is a charming title bursting with a palette of color and animation.

Its engrossing world and complete lack of violence make it appropriate to players of any age -- including young children -- yet it's not a childish to be ignored by adults, either.

Its story focuses on five distinctly unique little ninjas who are tasked with an arduous mission of thwarting the plans of the evil Samurai Warlord. There are many exciting activities to partake in along the way, collectables to discover, and funny bosses to defeat.

There's currently zero information on a sequel, but the game has received numerous ports and spin-offs and will likely be included in Square Enix's future plans, who is now owner of this title.

Skies of Arcadia

Known in Japan as Eternal Arcadia and widely regarded as one of the best RPG's of all time, Skies of Arcadia tells a unique tale about a group of air pirates and their struggle against an oppressive empire. It's a story underlined by a strong political motif.

The game features a diverse cast of memorable characters, both heroes and villains, as well as a vast 3D world which is open to exploration in a fully customizable airship.

Engaging in ship-to-ship combat acts as one of the game's main highlights.

The game was launched exclusively on the Dreamcast and later ported to the GameCube as Skies of Arcadia: Legends which included additional exclusive content.

There are no official news on a potential sequel, but considering the recent revival of the Shenmue saga, this gem of an RPG may yet see the light of day.

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That concludes the list. Is there a game you love which has a long overdue sequel? Let us know in the comments below, and for news on sequels as and when they are released stay tuned to GameSkinny!

Published Jun. 22nd 2018

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My favorite superhero is Spider-Man and I'm arachnophobic.

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