SNES Platform RSS Feed | GameSkinny.com SNES RSS Feed on GameSkinny.com https://www.gameskinny.com/ en Launch Media Network 7 Big Ways Nintendo Has Innovated Over the Decades https://www.gameskinny.com/f3lxd/7-big-ways-nintendo-has-innovated-over-the-decades https://www.gameskinny.com/f3lxd/7-big-ways-nintendo-has-innovated-over-the-decades Tue, 24 Dec 2019 10:00:01 -0500 Josh Broadwell

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The DS and Touch Control

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What do you do when you own the handheld gaming market and have brought handheld systems to new heights of efficiency and convenience? You create a chunky device from a 1980s dream of the future, try and market it with would-be sexy touching games and ads, then say screw it, dump a ton of games on it, and sell it to millions upon millions (upon millions) of people.

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In case you didn't know, that's what Nintendo did with the original DS.

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The DS' big draw was, of course, the revolutionary touch screen on the system's lower half. It threw open the doors of creative possibility and led to what was easily one of the best libraries of handheld gaming — and Nintendo's biggest marketing successes.

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The reason was simple. Touch screen use could be as complicated as drawing your own map to get around in a labyrinth or just streamlining menus for RPGs like Pokemon. It pre-dated the Wii U gamepad as the ideal form of inventory management and even offered some truly fun — and sometimes truly hideous — methods of making characters move around.

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For the first time since the D-pad, the simple act of moving characters was once again exciting and immersive, like the Wii, capable of re-igniting old gaming passions and sparking new ones.

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Sony and Microsoft didn't jump on the touch screen bandwagon quite the same as they had the motion control wagon, just because it's harder to make as an add-on like Kinect, let alone to make it work right (look at the Vita's rear touch screen, for example).

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Nintendo itself was iffy with its touch screen support after a while, especially moving into the Wii U era when it basically was just inventory management. Now with the Switch, we see a touch screen that gets very little use indeed. And that's a shame given its potential for creative game design.

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These are just a few of the major ways Nintendo innovated over the years. There are countless others, and not just from Nintendo, so tell us your favorite gaming innovation in the comments below!

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Motion Control

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Motion control has technically been around much longer than Nintendo. Arcade cabinets used variations of it, from the boxing glove of Heavyweight Champ to those motion-controlled vehicle games in movie theater lobbies that let us take control of a jet ski or X-Wing. Nintendo and Sega both tried early forms of motion control with home consoles, with the NES' Light Zapper and Sega's Activator, neither of which was really all that successful.

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From there, motion control became a gimmick of sorts. Nintendo spin-offs like Kirby Tilt 'N Tumble and Yoshi Topsy Turvy, along with Dreamcast classics Sega Bass Fishing and Samba De Amigo used variations of motion control. But it's telling that these were limited to spin-offs and experimental games. The market wasn't ready for motion control, and neither were developers.

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Fast forward to 2005. Nintendo unveils the codename for its newest system, the Nintendo Revolution that would later be dubbed the Wii. Conceived as a way to carve a new place for Nintendo in a market dominated by expensive, powerful consoles, the Revolution was exactly what it sounded like, a huge shake-up for the games industry all thanks to the "revolutionary" input device that relied on motion control.

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How the Wii's motion control was revolutionary depends on perspective. It certainly re-invigorated gaming, drawing in hordes of people who'd never before touched a game in their lives while at the same time offering new ways to experience gaming for long-time gamers.

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The Wii's brand of motion control inspired Sony and Microsoft versions as well, and though it can't be said for certain, the widespread acceptance of motion control could have had a hand in pushing VR gaming forward as well.

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Admittedly, most of these motion control games devolved into gimmicks themselves, with precious few examples that really made good use of motion control. Its real legacy is in bringing people together and pushing gaming further into the mainstream.

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Save Batteries

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I could just leave the heading here, and that would suffice. Really, save batteries were probably the best things for gaming alongside the NES, and we still benefit from their beneficence today.

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“Beneficence” isn’t just used there for snazzy word choice either, as most parents would probably agree, because there is a kind of obligation developers have to make their games actually playable long-term without completely imploding.

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Prior to The Legend of Zelda, almost every game had no way of letting you continue your fun. Some arcade cabinets had a kind of suspend feature that let you pop more coins in for additional fuel or whatever to continue going, but there wasn’t any real way to actually back up your progress.

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The lines blur a bit as far as who actually innovated with the idea of battery-powered save files. Pop and Chips, a 1985 game on the Super Cassette Vision utilized a literal battery save, where the feature used two AA batteries to power the save file.

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Why Pop and Chips used this feature is a little less clear. It’s essentially the same kind of game as Bubble Bobble, not exactly requiring suspended or saved data for progression purposes. However, Nintendo’s Family Basic programming tool for Famicom games used a similar AA battery-powered feature a year prior to Pop and Chips, though of course, a programming tool and an actual game are two different things. 

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Regardless, fast forward to 1987’s release of The Legend of Zelda, and Nintendo offers something in that cartridge that would stick around for a long time: a CR2032 battery that lets you record your progress. Games like Zelda would have been nigh-on impossible without this feature, though Nintendo didn’t adopt it full force for a while yet.

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Many — too many — SNES-era games relied on password systems that half the time never worked, much to the chagrin of players and parents the world over. However, as the era progressed and transitioned into the next generation of gaming, the save battery sparked changes. Some games used the little CR2032, while others such as Neo-Geo and Sony looked to memory cards for saving salvation.

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The Xbox was the first system to use built in memory, and that pretty much takes us where we are today, with systems packing various degrees of internal storage and almost completely removing the need for any kind of external backup — except Nintendo, ironically. The Switch absolutely needs an SD card for storage thanks to its teeny 32GB internal storage system.

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Still, the save battery led to these developments and made possible all manner of gaming experiences we never would have had otherwise.

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Blurring Console Boundaries

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That blurring actually began long, long before the Switch. One could reasonably say it started with the handheld Game & Watch, where Nintendo tried replicating the arcade experience in handheld form, and the Game Boy carved a separate niche for handheld games.

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Then came the NES era, when Nintendo Japan released the Wide Boy adapter. It unfortunately never came West.

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In the SNES era, though, Nintendo released the Super Game Boy peripheral, which did exactly what the name says: it let you play Game Boy games, and some Game Boy Color games, on your Super Nintendo.

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That meant, well, that you could play Game Boy games on your TV. They were blown up to whatever size your screen was, and you could choose several different color palettes and background frames to make the space between the game border and the edge of your screen more interesting.

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Fancy it might not have been — the JP-only Super Game Boy 2 had more bells and whistles technically — but looking back, you can see it was a step towards the philosophy that led to the Switch.

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The Nintendo 64’s peripheral was for dev-use only, so then we skip ahead to the Game Boy Player. It’s basically a gussied-up version of the Super Game Boy that lets you play Game Boy Advance games on your big screen, and then the console divide widened again after the DS and Wii came on the scene.

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It’s not surprising. Both offered their own unique gimmicks that increased sales and solidified Nintendo’s two main audience segments. Why experiment from there and risk alienating either segment when both are so happy to give you money?

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Apparently, it’s because Nintendo just couldn’t stay away from the idea of blending console and handheld experiences. We all know the Wii U wasn’t quite what it could have been, thanks to some iffy marketing, lack of third-party support, and, frankly, somewhat confusing main feature.

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Still, it was basically the Switch 0.5, offering players the chance to play their console-quality games on a portable device without losing much in quality except some pixels.

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That concept blew up enormously in 2017 when the Switch launched, offering games like The Witcher 3, Doom, and Breath of the Wild on a portable device.

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With the 3DS basically on Palpatine-levels of life support at this point and the VIta well and truly buried, it’s safe to say Nintendo’s first innovations with the Wide Boy and Super Game Boy paid off big time in creating something completely unprecedented in the games industry.

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It’s even more interesting considering Nintendo basically created the handheld gaming market to begin with. Nintendo giveth handheld gaming and Nintendo sort of taketh it away, I guess.

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Handheld Gaming

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Handheld gaming started long before Gunpei Yokoi’s Game Boy system launched. The first handheld video games can be traced back back to Milton Bradley’s Microvision, that clunky retro gem of a system with the tiny screen. It was innovative on its own and launched with a variety of titles, but it was also highly impractical. The screen broke too easily, and it was so tiny

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Around the same time, Yokoi headed development of the old handheld Game & Watch devices for Nintendo, most of which featured the silhouette man many now know thanks to Smash Bros..

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Others were miniaturized versions of arcade classics, though, like Mario Bros. (the un-super variety) and the Donkey Kong line of games (before the Kongs established their own country).

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That fact itself is remarkable in an industry built around games only being played on massive computers, arcade cabinets you couldn’t take home, or units you could take home like Atari that tied you to a TV.

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These were mostly short games and very arcade-like in scope and structure, or just copies of what you could get elsewhere, plus even Microvision was able to swap out multiple (expensive) cartridges on one system — something Game & Watch couldn’t do.

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That’s why the Game Boy itself was an even bigger innovation. You had the bigger, for its time, screen, plus a decent launch library with tons more games to follow, games that carved their own path completely separate from their console counterparts.

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From Metroid II sending Samus into the depths of the bleepy monochrome Metroid home planet to Link exploring the island of his dreams in Link’s Awakening, the Game Boy offered a completely new handheld experience — so long as you had the batteries and just the right light for it.

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From there, Nintendo has continued innovating in handheld gaming, improving systems, offering experiences that are sometimes arguably better than console games, and now, of course, coming close to making handheld gaming itself a thing of the past by blurring the console boundaries.

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The NES, Gaming's Salvation

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What makes the humble Nintendo Entertainment System innovative? You might ask. After all, it wasn’t the first console. Atari had that covered. What Atari didn’t have, though, was quality — not leading up to the 1983 video game crash, at least.

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The flood of what today we’d call shovelware meant both that the games industry was very close indeed to collapsing on itself, as consumers balked against the rising tide of garbage games and what basically amounted to advertising material. That's something we still see today, but not at the percentage the industry saw pre-crash.

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Enter the NES.

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After a failed partnership with Atari and some big redesigns attempting to distinguish it from the Famicom, Nintendo finally released the system in the West. There were a few things that made the NES different from its predecessors and essentially saved the video game industry, but the biggest was the software.

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It’s hard to realize it now, but NES games completely revolutionary, unlike anything that came before. Defender kickstarted the sidescroller and Gradius took it a bit further, but Super Mario Bros. refined it by combining platforming adventure with a huge array of obstacles, and a human character instead of the tired spaceship everyone had grown used to.

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The Legend of Zelda wasn’t the first adventure game either, but its structure, coherence, and design were all vastly improved from the weird blip that was Atari’s Adventure. Of course, the NES was home to some crap games too, but Nintendo’s licensing policies — where the good ol’ seal of quality came from — prevented the NES from going the same route as Atari and ensured the games industry’s survival.

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Ironically, Nintendo later reversed that policy with WiiWare and now the Switch eShop, so we get some titles with lightly questionable quality after all.

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Though some credit things like R.O.B. and the NES’s overall style with keeping it from self-destructing, it’s hard to justify those claims. The 1986 survey that tried to find out how many NES owners bought it because of the R.O.B. toy and style only surveyed 200 people.

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By the end of the following year, Family Computing Magazine pointed to the likes of Super Mario Bros. and Zelda as reasons to own the NES, saying R.O.B. was cute, but basically pointless. Sorry buddy.

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The D-pad

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This one should be fairly obvious why it’s innovative and worth discussing. Until Gunpei Yokoi decided the Game & Watch version of arcade classic Donkey Kong would work better with a D-pad, games were played either with a joystick or mouse-and-keyboard combination.

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That’s fine under the right circumstances. But plunking an arcade-style joystick in the middle of a small gamepad really just doesn’t work that well, the Commodore 64 had the keyboard covered already, to middling effect, and Coleco’s multi-button phonepad was perfect for octopi only.

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EIther way, the goal at this point was differentiating Nintendo’s products from the failed Atari, especially in the West, and joysticks would not be the way to achieve that. So, the humble D-Pad was born and has sort of stayed around ever since after it became a feature of the Famicom/NES gamepad.

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And it might be more innovative than you’d initially think. Imagine controlling Link in the first The Legend of Zelda with just a joystick. Along with generally just being clunky, it’d get pretty tiresome after a while. That doesn’t even take into account issues of accuracy, like those jumps in Super Mario Bros. that require absolute precision — something you definitely don’t get with a joystick. 

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That’s probably why scholar Alan Richard da Luz argued, at the Human-Computer Interaction conference in 2014, game interfaces like the D-pad evolve over time as complements to the gameplay and narrative experience. A D-pad gives far more tactile response than a joystick, helped along by that general feeling of connection between the direction buttons (conspicuously absent in the base Switch’s four arrows).

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Just like that, literally with the press of some buttons, you’re taken out of the gimmicky arcade cabinet experience  and pushed into something much more immersive, where you feel and see your actions on that little pad causing direct effects in the game world. When that coincides with deeper and more varied experiences like the NES and Game Boy offered, then you get a winning combination of convenience and immersion.. 

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And then Nintendo takes it away again with the Switch in a move we can only look at and laugh over.

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Nintendo might not have been a big player in the gaming market prior to the 1980s, but there's no denying the Big N's left its mark on the industry ever since.

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Though lambasted for seemingly inscrutable decisions or appearing out of touch with the modern industry and consumer needs, Nintendo and its innovations were also partly responsible for shaping how the modern gaming industry developed in some key ways.

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Not all of its innovations were huge successes of course — hello, Wii U — while some built off the success of previous products and took them to new heights or paved the way for vital parts of modern console construction.

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Whether it's something as foundational as a new interface method or as dramatic as rescuing the industry from sliding into the abyss created by shovelware, Nintendo earned its place as one of the foremost companies in the gaming industry. Here are five of the biggest innovations Nintendo's cranked out over the years.

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Nintendo Switch Online Getting 6 New Classic Games https://www.gameskinny.com/mikog/nintendo-switch-online-getting-6-new-classic-games https://www.gameskinny.com/mikog/nintendo-switch-online-getting-6-new-classic-games Thu, 05 Dec 2019 11:43:30 -0500 Josh Broadwell

It's been a little while since Nintendo added SNES games to Nintendo Switch online, with the caution that we shouldn't get our hopes up for regular content updates

But the dearth of new classic games is over for now. Nintendo Switch Online is getting six new classic games, four from the SNES and two from the NES.

These classic games will be added to their storefronts on December 12. The following is a list of the games coming to Switch. 

SNES Games
  • Star Fox 2
  • Breath of Fire 2
  • Kirby Super Star
  • Super Punch-Out!!
NES Games
  • Crystalis
  • Journey to Silius

Some of these classic titles have been available on various renditions of the Virtual Console over the past 10 years. But it's the first time outside of the SNES Classic Mini we'll be able to get our hands on Star Fox 2. That says nothing of how long it's been since Crystalis and Journey to Silius have been easily accessible.

For those uninitiated, Crystalis is a cult classic RPG from SNK, following the adventures of an unnamed hero in a post-apocalyptic world. Journey is a side-scrolling shooter inspired by the Terminator films — a product of the '80s if ever there was one.

If you're looking to get your hands on those lovely SNES controllers Nintendo put up when SNES games first launched on Nintendo Switch Online, you'll have to wait a little longer. The controllers won't be back in stock until January. On the other hand, the NES controllers are back in stock.

Stay tuned to GameSkinny for more Nintendo Switch Online news as it develops.

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Wireless SNES Controllers for Nintendo Switch Available Now — For Some https://www.gameskinny.com/q6sdn/wireless-snes-controllers-for-nintendo-switch-available-now-for-some https://www.gameskinny.com/q6sdn/wireless-snes-controllers-for-nintendo-switch-available-now-for-some Tue, 17 Sep 2019 11:23:11 -0400 Josh Broadwell

Nintendo recently added 20 SNES games to the Nintendo Switch Online subscription library, and the wireless SNES controllers that accompany those additions are available for purchase now — but only for Nintendo Switch Online members.

The controllers are priced at $29.99 each, plus an extra $5 for shipping, with a limit of four per MyNintendo account. They're set to begin shipping tomorrow, September 18.

The SNES controllers are completely wireless and come with a USB charger, though they can be charged using the Nintendo Switch AC adapter as well.

Unlike the NES controllers released last year, these don't slide onto the Joy-Con rails though — which is sort of okay, because that feature had no practical purpose anyway, even if it did look nifty.

However, since beginning this article and reaching the second paragraph, the product page shows the items are temporarily out of stock. There's no estimated restock date, though, at the very least, Nintendo's record with the SNES Classic Mini shows it's (presumably) learned its lesson about demand for retro goods, especially after the fiasco that was the NES Classic Mini's stock situation.

We'll update accordingly if there's any word about restocks or anticipated shortages.

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Don't Expect New SNES Games on Switch Every Month, Says Nintendo https://www.gameskinny.com/o01jj/dont-expect-new-snes-games-on-switch-every-month-says-nintendo https://www.gameskinny.com/o01jj/dont-expect-new-snes-games-on-switch-every-month-says-nintendo Fri, 06 Sep 2019 15:14:12 -0400 Josh Broadwell

Just yesterday, Nintendo Switch Online subscribers finally had their prayers answered and got access to SNES games on Nintendo Switch, though there's a bit of a catch. The Big N says not to expect new games added on a regular basis.

The update was actually part of Nintendo Japan's original announcement about SNES/Super Famicom games, and the folks over at Vooks recently translated it.

Since NES titles were added to the online service last year, Nintendo has regularly added two, sometimes three, games to the library every month.

Now that the initial 20 SNES games have a library of their own on Nintendo Switch, there's apparently no regular schedule for any future offerings. The same applies to future NES games as well.

Those concerned that this means no new SNES games will be added at all should rest easy, though. Nintendo says games will still be added from time to time, just "irregularly" with no set schedule.

This development isn't altogether surprising, though. Nintendo has a history of erratic release schedules on its retro services, with the Virtual Console — the 3DS one in particular — being recent and rather notorious examples.

Still, this first release of SNES games is already close to a third of the number of NES titles on the Switch, and the latter includes duplicate SP editions. Even without regular newcomers, it seems Nintendo is set to maintain a healthy SNES library on Switch.

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New FCC Filing Could Point to SNES Games for Nintendo Switch Online https://www.gameskinny.com/k6bu2/new-fcc-filing-could-point-to-snes-games-for-nintendo-switch-online https://www.gameskinny.com/k6bu2/new-fcc-filing-could-point-to-snes-games-for-nintendo-switch-online Tue, 13 Aug 2019 11:45:23 -0400 Josh Broadwell

Nintendo has submitted another new FCC filing, only this time, it's for a brand-new piece of hardware: a wireless SNES controller compatible with the Nintendo Switch.

A user on Resetera spotted the filing, which can be viewed here. The model code begins with HAC, which is the code used for all hardware associated with the Nintendo Switch.

New pieces of technology and communication technology have to be approved by the FCC before they release, which means it's often a good time to spot a company's plans for upcoming announcements well before they're officially revealed.

Such was the case with the recent Nintendo Switch hardware revision that improved battery power thanks to a modified processor.

SNES controllers aren't anything new for the Switch. Third-party peripherals manufacturers have been releasing various forms of controllers past and present since the system launched, including the new 8bitDo SNES-styled controller.

What makes this controller potentially something special is the timing.

Nintendo Switch Online is coming up on its one-year anniversary in September, and fans have long been asking for more retro games aside from the exhausted supply of NES games released for the service every month.

It's no secret Nintendo Switch Online lacks some key features, and it's something Nintendo recognizes as well.

Outside of cloud saves and sporadic special demos and discounts, subscribers only get access to a digital library of NES games. Many of those are firmly situated on the obscure side of gaming history, too, like this month's offerings of Kung-Fu Hero and Vice: Project Doom. More popular retro titles would certainly be an appealing addition for the online service.

Since NES controllers were released for the Switch when Nintendo added NES games to the Online service, this new filing has many wondering whether we might actually see SNES games released for Nintendo Switch Online starting next month.

Only time will tell. 

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8 Games and Franchises with the Biggest Translation Gaffes https://www.gameskinny.com/3ja5f/8-games-and-franchises-with-the-biggest-translation-gaffes https://www.gameskinny.com/3ja5f/8-games-and-franchises-with-the-biggest-translation-gaffes Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:30:01 -0400 Josh Broadwell

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Breath of Fire II

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Fans love to hate Capcom. Sometimes, it seems unfair. Other times, like when you remember Breath of Fire II, then it's completely understandable, and you just step back and let things go. Oh, if only the above picture had been true.

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The early BoF games had an interesting history. Squaresoft handled the first one's localization and publishing. It had some problems, sure. The dialogue and mechanics were rough around the edges but there's still enjoyment to be had with it.

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You would think of the BoF games, the first would have all the terrible issues, that Square would have taken the opportunity to sabotage a potential rival creeping in on its RPG monopoly.

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Or perhaps someone at Square could tell that left to its own devices, Capcom would do that quite nicely on its own.

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Breath of Fire II's translation and localization are full of ludicrous descriptions and sound effects and unclear dialogue. It's a showing on par with gems from the '80s like "all your base are belong to us" and Castlevania II.

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It's near Deborah Cliff...

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There are some classic signs of bad, careless translation as well, where the untranslated text is left in alongside the translated script, or even worse, the writer just added a transliteration, which isn't, y'know... actually a translation.

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Manju are Japanese buns, so this particular instance is one of those cases where you forget  where the writer forgets to delete what they chose not to use. Note the transliteration was highlighted as the key point, though.

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Other errors are less in keeping with the context. I'm not sure about you, but I see what could possibly be a boar — no bears, though.

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It's amazing how punctuation can be so significant. Some bizarre uses of periods in here, except where a period is actually needed.

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At first glance, there doesn't appear to be anything wrong with these two. It's just a nice, normal observation from a character who obviously hasn't seen Nina for a while. Except, she isn't seeing Nina now either.

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This isn't a case where the party members all fold into the leader. The girl with the wings near the table? That's Nina. This woman just told Ryu he's not a little girl anymore, and I can only imagine how surprised he must have been to learn that.

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If these things had remained a relic of the '90s BoF II, that would be a different story. But two different re-releases later — first on the Game Boy Advance and then on the Virtual Console — and Capcom still believed this translation was worth keeping.

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---

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Modern games aren't free from the plague of bad translation, sadly, but their shortcomings certainly do provide an amusing way to pass the time. Whether it's Capcom's carelessness in the '90s, Atlus's rushed schedule from a few years back, or the flood of cheap titles inundating digital platforms, it seems like bad translations are simply a universal factor of gaming life.

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Got any examples of terrible game translations? Share yours in the comments!

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/h/e/a/header-4e5b8.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/h/e/a/header-4e5b8.jpg","type":"slide","id":"195527","description":"

Persona 5

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Including Persona 5 on this list might be controversial. However, there's no denying that good though the game undoubtedly is, it falls far short of Atlus's standards in localization and what fans have come to expect from the company. That departure from the high-quality norm is a bigger gaffe than any translation awkwardness in the game.

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Fortunately, for the most part, the game's dialogue quirks don't come anywhere near Kitty Love and Hollow Fragment levels of bad. You do have to pause for a moment and consider what's being said from time to time, though.

\n

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Morgana is pretty quirky to begin with, so at first glance, this seems like just another manifestation of that personality. But the sentence doesn't technically make sense. "seriously trying to kill us" maybe or "serious about killing us," but serious to kill us is what you'd expect from an inexperienced translator or an early ESL student.

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Conner Kramer put together a site listing some notably egregious errors (and getting some flak for it from the fan community as well), and he added some alternatives for a few of them. Here's an example:

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His revision is a lot more like what fans got in Persona 4 and much more in keeping with the character doing the speaking as well. One would expect a high school principle to say something like "misdemeanor is not tolerated..." as opposed to "you will behave yourself," which is better suited to an elementary school setting.

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There are other signs of carelessness too.

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Image via j-entranslations

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Persona games rely heavily on good dialogue to push the story forward and keep players interested. These issues are hardly game breaking, but they do break the immersion, which makes it difficult to remain invested.

\n

What lies behind the issue is a mystery. It's possible some elements of localization were a rushed job, since the game was delayed to begin with. But it's equally possible it was simply oversight.

\n

Yu Namba, senior project manager at Atlus and responsible for a good deal of Persona games' localization processes, once said he couldn't account for everything that happened, but tried to make sure the core narrative was coherent and clear. Other things could slip through the cracks, as they apparently did for P5.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/k/i/t/kitty-love-header-79423.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/k/i/t/kitty-love-header-79423.jpg","type":"slide","id":"195505","description":"

Kitty Love

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The Switch has taken over the Vita's place as supreme host of otome games. The eShop is flooded with romance games, most of which are geared towards female audiences, and many of which have rather low production values.

\n

Kitty Love takes the crown for one of the worst translations, though. It's the usual quirky premise for one of these games. The protagonist works at a flower shop by day and turns into a cat by night, because why not.

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As is a growing trend with eShop games, the game's end result is less than stellar, with apparently very little in the way of quality control either by the developer or Nintendo's alleged curation process.

\n

\n

The quintessential tourist activity — buttering the day

\n

Some of the errors here aren't quite Hollow Fragment bad, but they do range from the mild to the completely unintelligible, up to the "how could you think this was okay?"

\n

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The protagonist is in cat form in the above, so presumably, this is just a special way of saying he held the cat

\n

Many of the scenarios just take a bit of figuring out to understand.

\n

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That isn't one of them, though.

\n

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Or that one.

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Okay, so maybe it is on par with Hollow Fragment.

\n

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That's...not good.

\n

Slapdash niche games riddled with errors aren't exactly new, but there are a couple of things that make Kitty Love stand out as particularly noteworthy.

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The first is the fact that it exists at all on the Switch eShop. Nintendo claimed from the eShop's early days that it would be akin to a curated platform, and not every pitch, even from well-known developers, would be accepted. Fast forward two short years, and it seems that policy has quietly been abandoned.

\n

What's more, unlike some games, including Hollow Fragment, Kitty Love continues to exist in this form — no patches, no changes, no discounts. Whether the amusing dialogue is worth the price of admission is for you to decide.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/r/y/crystal-header-90689.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/r/y/crystal-header-90689.jpg","type":"slide","id":"195513","description":"

Pokemon Crystal: Vietnamese Version

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Pokemon Vietnamese Crystal has been a thing on the internet for many years, and it's practically a meme generator. The game has a strange history. It started as a Chinese translation of the Japanese script, but despite being considered a Vietnamese version, the game is pretty much entirely in English.

\n

Players are greeted with this.

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They do? I'm...so sorry

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For some reason, the translator was a bit free with referring to Pokemon as Elf and as Monster, depending on the context, though there didn't seem to be much of a guiding reason behind which scenario got which reference. Either way, there's not much of a link between professor or scholar and monster.

\n

Some of the text is comprehensible, and you can get an idea of how it went from the original meaning to the slightly garbled one.

\n

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Friend makes sense, since Pokemon are often referred to as friend in the script. Store... eh. Center and shop are close, but that's starting to stretch it (especially when everything in there is free).

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And then you get ones like this, from the next script point.

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It's easy to pick up on the fact that "grasp" is used for catch, but basin?

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This early conversation shortly after the rival makes an appearance is unique, but not actually instructive.

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This one doesn't seem to be very clear either, until you realize he's talking about Mr. Pokemon.

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Apart from the phrasing, it makes sense. I don't know what the original script says, but I imagine it's something referring to Mr. Pokemon as an older man, hence "Grandfather."

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But then you get this again.

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And this.

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The battle system is its own set of special. The theory goes that perhaps there was an indexing error that threw descriptions and translations off, since some are correct, just out of place. Other issues involved transliterating Japanese grammatical particles that weren't intended to be spoken or read.

\n

\n

But it doesn't explain everything about it or the naming conventions.

\n

It certainly doesn't explain the unique way of obtaining items, where the game throws the F-bomb your way every time you place an item in the bag.

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Most of the game is almost impossible to understand. If you're interested, you can check out the original Let's Play that sparked the phenomenon. 

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/s/a/o/sao-header-da995.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/s/a/o/sao-header-da995.jpg","type":"slide","id":"195496","description":"

Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment

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Sword Art Online is a popular transmedia franchise, spanning manga, anime, and video games. In most cases, SOA in all of its forms tells a compelling story with likeable characters, and it's garnered a decent-sized following in the West. We even ranked Sword Art Online: Hollow Realization as one of 2017's best anime franchise games.

\n

Its sequel, Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment had a very, very rough start in the West, though. Like a handful of other Japanese games released in Asia before the West, it initially had an Asian release with an English language option.

\n

But that translation was bad. In fact, bad doesn't even begin to cover it.

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Japan has its share of race problems, but this wasn't an instance of blatant insensitivity. This is just referring to Kirito, the man wearing black. Though, I don't think he was sexually harassing anyone.

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This isn't exactly what you'd expect to find as a subject line in a hero's inbox.  Fear not, though — it's just monster extermination, SAO Asian translation-style.

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The translation was also just plain lazy. SAO games stray into racy territory now and again, but , this isn't a reference to one of those adult visual novel scenes. This is just bad translation of a symbol with a wide variety of meanings, most of which relate to war, exploration, and things like that.

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Fans who played the version that existed prior to the improved translation patch saw lots of references to penetration throughout the game, in some unusual contexts as well.

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\n

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Some of the (many) instances do make me wonder whether the translator had a slight idea of what they were saying and tried to just make a joke out of it.

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This wasn't the only instance of single-minded determination to stick to one translation regardless of context either.

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A standard Japanese greeting is yoroshiku, or the full version, yoroshiku onegaishimasu. It can mean a variety of things, from "nice to meet you," to "let's get along" or "let's work together," among other potential definitions.

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It's useful when you first meet someone, of course. But Asuna and other characters  would say this every time Kirito chose them to accompany him on a penetration — er, that is, an exploration trip.

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Same to you!

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There are countless other instances of unclear or ridiculous phrasing as well.

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This being one good example.

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As a matter of fact, there is.

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Bandai Namco isn't known for always making the best decisions, but it's odd how an established company ended up using a very evidently poorly trained translator for the original English version.

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One of my favorite things about being underground is seeing the sky.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/t/a/l/tales-293b4.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/t/a/l/tales-293b4.jpg","type":"slide","id":"195473","description":"

The Tales of... Games

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Bandai Namco's Tales of... series is known for its endearing characters, interesting plots, and snappy dialogue. However, not all entries are created equally.

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The most recent new Tales of game, Tales of Berseria, was lauded for its darker take on the usually chipper stories and characters, but it suffered from some very uneven dialogue and writing towards the end of the game

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Not all the errors are quite as confusing as this one, though.

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But the biggest issue with the numerous gaffes towards the end of the game is that most of them end up completely unintelligible, like these next two.

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Bandit shrooms don't even exist in the game.

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It's worth noting the voiced lines don't always match with the written dialogue, though. This fact leads some to suspect that perhaps what happened with Berseria was a sudden change in script or direction near the end of production that didn't make it to the localization department and was just crammed in at the last minute.

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Errors in Earlier Games
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Either way, these kinds of issues aren't restricted to modern titles. Clyde Mandellin with Legends of Localization noticed this interesting mistake in Tales of the Abyss that's rather easy to overlook.

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In between all the talk of fonons and fomicry in the early part of the game, it's easy to forget that the seventh fonon was known about for a long, long time. After all, how could Tear be a practicing Seventh Fonist if it was only just discovered?

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The error here comes from a loose translation of the original Japanese, which only said it was the most recently discovered, which doesn't give any kind of time reference.

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Then there was the official English translation of Tales of Phantasia, with this interesting little nugget.

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The original line was Ragnarok, but Mandelin says older versions of Microsoft Word didn't include Ragnarok in the dictionary and only offered Kangaroo with a capital K as the first recommended choice. This one was a careless spell check error that somehow managed to make it through to publication.

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Why the editors of a fantasy game script thought spell check could be relied on anyway is another matter.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/v/i/i/viii-header-3b247.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/v/i/i/viii-header-3b247.jpg","type":"slide","id":"195484","description":"

Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana

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The Ys series is one of gaming's longest-running series, with Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana being the most recent entry. While its action oriented gameplay and immersive worlds haven't changed dramatically over the decades, its publication status in the West certainly has.

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Most of the early titles after the original two ended up as fan translations, before XSeed began bringing them over as part of its partnership with developer Nihon Falcom (we won't talk about that Konami incident with Ys VI).

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And then came Nippon Ichi Software America. As part of Falcom's attempts to expand its international audience, it gave the publishing license for Ys VIII to NISA, with some initially unforeseen results.

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This character's bowel habits became a running gag in the original translation, which shouldn't be too surprising since NISA also gave us Esty Dee (STD) as a localization joke (as they did in Atelier Rorona: The Alchemist of Arland).

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It's okay Reja; most of us don't either.

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The game was riddled with untranslated text, randomly scattered here and there — a common error in badly handled games from the '90s, but not something one would expect from modern games. It's certainly not in keeping with what fans expected, which made it stand out all the more.

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Lines like this are common as well, making certain narrative segments and even dialogue a sort of guessing game. But that's not the worst thing.

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The game originally had a passable English translation, especially for most main segments and place names. Why NISA  re-translated isn't clear, particularly when the re-translation was as it was.

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Fortunately, NISA publicly recognized its errors and re-re-translated the script, providing a much better experience all 'round and apparently earning Falcom's trust enough to warrant being given its next big overseas project, The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel III

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/i/n/final-fantasy-6c05d.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/i/n/final-fantasy-6c05d.jpg","type":"slide","id":"195489","description":"

Final Fantasy Games

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Most Final Fantasy games are high quality, well-produced works. That doesn't mean they are error-free, but for the most part, the base games are well-written with good localization.

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Unfortunately, Square Enix has gained a reputation for not really caring about how those high quality works transfer to other platforms based on their lazy ports and similarly low-effort localizations.

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No, the above isn't a screenshot from an alternate Final Fantasy IV universe where the Red Wings were Baron's premiere delivery service with Cecil as their leader. It's the first line of script in the mobile FFIV port.

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The port was supposed to use the DS version's script, but obviously, something happened along the way. It made its own mistakes, while keeping those of its predecessor.

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And then there's the mobile port of Final Fantasy VI.

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Given how many times "esper" appears in the script, it's baffling how this mistake wasn't caught before the game launched, to say nothing of the awkward phrasing that was left untouched.

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Still, the script is entirely readable, unlike some other inclusions in this list. The biggest issue is that errors like this are expected with most SE ports, causing one to wonder about the overall attitude of the port teams and the company towards its franchises.

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Errors in Original Versions
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However, the original versions are certainly not free from errors.

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Final Fantasy VII fans will already know this screenshot contains two errors The potentially less obvious one is Aeris's name. It's actually meant to be Aerith, and that's how it appears in all later mentions in the Final Fantasy universe.

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This was a common translation error in the 1990s, when localization teams were apparently not experienced in differentiating between easily misunderstood Japanese characters. Most people know about the "L" and "R" confusion, but "S" and "TH" is another one.

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There are, of course, other linguistic challenges to overcome as well.

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That above is a wyvern in Final Fantasy V.

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There's not really any reason other than just "whoops" for this one from Final Fantasy X, though to be fair, it was fixed in the HD remasters.

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"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/a/d/bad-translation-header-85854.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/a/d/bad-translation-header-85854.jpg","type":"slide","id":"195737","description":"

Video game fans have been dealing with the highs and lows of translation and localization since the 1980s. It's a risk built into a hobby that often relies on media translated from one context-sensitive language to a very different one.

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Some of the early examples of translation gaffes have made their way into meme-dom and are among the best-known examples of games gone wrong, games such as Top Wing and Ghosts N' Goblins.

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As time progressed, one would think these issues would gradually fade away, with more experienced translators and bigger budgets.

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That, however, didn't happen. Through the 1990s and up to recent years, video games still dealt shoddy translations, rushed schedules, and bad management — even some of the bigger games and studios.

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Some of the more egregious errors in these games and franchises are what this list focuses on, examples of games that should have been better from companies that ought to know better. Along the way, we'll touch on the reasons behind the gaffes and explore what, if anything, was done to remedy the problems.

"}]]]>
Devolver Digital Releasing First Game For Super Nintendo, Proceeds To Go To Charity https://www.gameskinny.com/mll6m/devolver-digital-releasing-first-game-for-super-nintendo-proceeds-to-go-to-charity https://www.gameskinny.com/mll6m/devolver-digital-releasing-first-game-for-super-nintendo-proceeds-to-go-to-charity Tue, 19 Feb 2019 13:31:07 -0500 QuintLyn

In a surprise announcement sure to make retro gamers and lovers of the Super Nintendo very excited, Hotline Miami and Broforce developer Devolver Digital, in concert with indie developer Mega Cat Studios, revealed a new SNES game titled Fork Parker's Crunch Out.

The tycoon-style game featuring Devolver Digitial's fictional CFO, Fork Parker, who also appeared in the Serious Sam games, is designed specifically for the Super Nintendo and available in extremely limited quantities.

In fact, there are only 500 copies available at the time of this writing.

The game costs $49.99, with all proceeds going to Take This, whose mission is "to decrease the stigma, and increase the support for, mental health in the game enthusiast community and inside the game industry."

With their purchase, Super Nintendo fans will get everything they'd expect from one of the console's games, including the box, the booklet, and the sense of satisfaction that comes with making the cartridge work on the third try after blowing dust out of it.

In Fork Parker's Crunch Out, players take on the role of CFO Fork Parker. Things aren't going as well as they have been thanks to a new publishing label angling for his share of the marker. So, he does what any money-hungry executive would: use questionable tactics and work his employees for as little pay as possible.

Don't worry, though, Devolver Digital and Mega Cat Studios promise the game was created without any actual crunch time involved. In fact, aside from raising money for a good charity, Fork Parker's Crunch Out serves another purpose. It's intended to raise awareness of the issues created by developer crunch by providing a humorous look at the pressures of game development.

With the resurgence of classic consoles in recent years, specifically miniature consoles such as the SNES mini, it's little surprise that company's such as Devolver might look to offer players more unique ways to re-experience classic games and, in this case, consoles. 

Perhaps Nintendo would even consider re-releasing some of its classics for the nearly 30-year-old system. While that's doubtful and nothing but wishful thinking at this point, it's obvious the audience is open to the prospect, especially considering a handful of fantastic games didn't make the cut for the mini. 

To find out more about Take This and the charity's mission, be sure to visit the foundation's official website

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Top Five Kirby Spin-Off Games https://www.gameskinny.com/caabb/top-five-kirby-spin-off-games https://www.gameskinny.com/caabb/top-five-kirby-spin-off-games Fri, 07 Sep 2018 14:32:57 -0400 Lee Forgione

Kirby fans know that the series falls into two categories. There are the classic platforming action games like Kirby Star Allies and Kirby's Dreamland, and then there are the experimental games that shove Kirby into every possible scenario from racing to pinball. Some of these titles are hit or miss but most of them are pretty fun. Here are the five best Kirby spin-off games.

5. Kirby's Pinball Land (Game Boy)

Released on the Game Boy in 1993, Kirby's Pinball Land kicks off the tangent of side games Kirby would star in over the years. More than just a pinball game featuring Kirby, this game involved ascending through a series of levels by shooting Kirby past the top of the screen. The third screen up is where a Warpstar could be found that would take you to a boss fight against Whispy Woods, Kracko, and the Poppy Bros. After clearing all three stages, you must face King Dedede in his famous boxing ring.

This game pulls all sorts of tricks to stop you in your tracks like having characters throw you back down if you run into them and freezing up the pinball flippers so you can't knock Kirby back up. It's still a fun game to this day and can be found in the 3DS eShop for only a few bucks, so give it a try. 

4. Kirby Tilt 'n' Tumble (Game Boy Color)

Utilizing a motion-sensing device built directly into the game cartridge, Kirby Tilt 'n' Tumble let players control the direction of Kirby by tilting the Game Boy Color in various directions. The goal was to guide Kirby through a series of obstacles and hazards to the end of the level. Jerking the Game Boy Color upward made Kirby jump, adding an extra layer of skill to the game. There are eight worlds, each with a boss battle at the end, as well as an assortment of mini-games. A sequel was in the works for the GameCube and would have used the GBA adapter to control Kirby, but this game was ultimately canceled.

3. Kirby Canvas Curse (Nintendo DS)

One of the most unique experiences from HAL Laboratory featured the touch screen of the Nintendo DS for its control scheme. In Kirby Canvas Curse, you guide Kirby to the end of each stage by drawing rainbow lines on the touch screen to move him along. Drawing loop de loops gives Kirby a boost of speed which helps clear trickier areas. This ability is limited, however, by a bar that depletes as you draw, so you have to carefully plan out each route while keeping an eye on this meter.

Tapping Kirby will either propel him forward and damage enemies or unleash whichever copy ability you're currently using, including Wheel, Beam, Stone and more. Featuring eight full worlds, boss battles, and some really fun mini-games, Canvas Curse sits near the top of the Kirby side-game hierarchy. A follow up to this game, Kirby and the Rainbow Curse, was released on the Wii U with mixed reception and a new clay model art style. 

2. Kirby Air Ride (GameCube)

The first and only Kirby racing game was also the only game in the series to be released on the GameCube. Throwing its own unique spin on the genre, acceleration was not activated via holding a button pressed down. Instead, each vehicle moved on its own and the A button was used to pull off speed boosting moves, use copy abilities, and come to a complete stop.

There are three modes to play around with, Air Ride, Top Ride, and City Trial. Air Ride is your basic Grand Prix featuring several sprawling tracks to race through. Top Ride presents a top-down view of a small self-contained track full of power-ups and hazards, while City Trial, the most popular of the three modes, puts players on a huge map together. The goal is to break open boxes and collect different power-ups that boost your top speed, turning, acceleration, and more. There's a set time limit, and at the end of each round players are pit against each other in a mini-game such as a battle royale or a drag race. Which power-ups you've collected will determine your success rate.

1. Kirby's Dream Course (SNES)

Last but not least is Kirby's Dream Course for the SNES, which I consider to be the crown jewel of the bunch. This game puts an interesting spin on golf as the goal is not simply to go for the hole. Before you can do that, you must first clear the board of all its enemies and the last enemy standing will turn into the hole. There's a variety of copy-abilities available to help you navigate the board. The Fireball ability sends you burning through the stage in whatever direction you're facing and the Freeze ability helps you pass water hazards by freezing it solid, allowing you to slide across.

Adding another layer of strategy to the game is the ability to curve your shots in different directions and keeping Kirby bouncing by pressing the A button upon landing. If all of these copy-abilities and special moves are orchestrated in a perfect fashion, it's possible to get a hole-in-one on every course. Anyone who can pull this off on some of the later courses is an insane genius as it takes a ton of dexterity to pull this off. 

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What did you think of this list of Kirby spin-off games? Are there any games you would have liked to see make the cut? Sound off in the comments below.

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What Happened to Goemon? https://www.gameskinny.com/pzzlp/what-happened-to-goemon https://www.gameskinny.com/pzzlp/what-happened-to-goemon Mon, 03 Sep 2018 12:08:46 -0400 Lee Forgione

Ganbare Goemon, or The Legend of The Mystical Ninja as it was called in North America, was one of my favorite series growing up. These games always had a good mix of action, adventure, and humor. Starring a colorful cast of characters and set in a cartoon-like feudal Japan, it's one of the few series of its time that fully embraced Japanese folklore.

It's main character, Goemon, was based off of Ishikawa Goemon, the famous thief depicted in Japanese folklore. The first few games presented him as this thief but subsequent games made him into your average run-of-the-mill game hero. This history is not very well known overseas, seeing as how so little entries in the series were released outside of Japan.

There have been dozens of games spanning multiple systems starting with arcades, then moving on to the NES, SNES, Nintendo 64, Game Boy, DS, both PlayStation 1 and 2, and even mobile. There was also an anime series. Only four of the twenty-nine titles made it stateside due to Konami stating that these games were too specific to the Japanese market. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the games that did make it over here. 

What set Goemon apart from other video game heroes was his weapon of choice. He didn't wield traditional game weapons like swords or guns. Instead, Goemon brandished a Japanese smoke pipe to pummel baddies with. As a kid, I never really gave much thought as to how ridiculous something like that was. I just enjoyed the ride.

While there have been several arcade and NES titles dating back to the mid-eighties, the first game to make it stateside was Ganbare Goemon: Yukihime Kyuushutsu Emaki for the SNES. This was of course renamed to something more appropriate for American audiences, The Legend of the Mystical Ninja.

Along with this localization came terrible translations for its main characters Goemon and his hammer toting pal, Ebisumaru. They were given the names Kid Ying and Dr. Yang, the most generic names anyone could ever give two Asian characters. Thankfully, the other supporting characters in the series, Yae and Sasuke, retained their original names.

The Legend of the Mystical Ninja was an awesome top-down action platformer with a ridiculous plot about saving ninja cats and a princess from the Otafu Army, a group of mime and clown counterfeiters. I spent a lot of hours playing this game growing up and was of course immediately interested in it's evolution on the Nintendo 64. 

Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon was the next game to make it stateside and will forever be one of my favorite games. It was a big sprawling 3D action game that, in a lot of ways, was my Ocarina of Time before Ocarina of Time came out.

It shared a lot of similar elements to Zelda games. Hearts were used as health and collecting four lucky cats would increase your health. There were several dungeons full of puzzles with big bosses waiting at the end and an absolutely gigantic world map to explore. In some parts, it went above and beyond Ocarina of Time by having gigantic rollerskating robot sections that lead into awesome first-person mech battles. There was also a silly plot in which Goemon must stop a group known as the Peach Mountain Shoguns from turning all of the land of Oedo into a fine arts theater in which to perform their plays.

It was full of choppy translations and broken English but was still a mighty fun game for its time. There was another Goemon game released in the US for Nintendo 64 and a Game Boy game but I wasn't as enthralled with those as the first two games.

So, what happened to Goemon?

It was a pretty popular series in Japan but the last game to come out over there was for the Nintendo DS in 2005. Since then, Goemon has only really been used as a character for Pachinko machines in Japanese arcades and gambling dens.

It's one of many series forgotten by Konami over the years, along with Twinbee and Parodius. Goemon recently made a cameo in Super Bomberman R as DLC but it's not enough. After thirteen years he deserves a comeback. I would love a new 3D Goemon game similar to his first outing on the Nintendo 64. It seems like Konami has ditched most of its unique and colorful characters in favor of edgier games like Metal Gear. There may not have been a big install base for Goemon overseas but niche gamers would probably appreciate one more entry in this series. I know I would. 

But it's understandable why so few games were localized as a lot of entries delve into weird territory such as dressing it's male characters up in ballet outfits and bunny men trying to westernize Japan. However, the US has warmed up to oddball titles over the years like Katamari Damacy and Hatoful Boyfriend so Goemon isn't too far out there for people to get. 

Hopefully some day we will see the Goemon series return to the gaming world in one form or another and by some miracle make it stateside for fans and newcomers. I'm sure there are people out there who will never forget such a fun and weird series. Goemon needs to jump out of those Pachinko machines and back onto television screens. Make it happen, Konami!

]]>
Top 10 Most Badass Video Game Characters of All time https://www.gameskinny.com/4a5w5/top-10-most-badass-video-game-characters-of-all-time https://www.gameskinny.com/4a5w5/top-10-most-badass-video-game-characters-of-all-time Tue, 10 Apr 2018 13:40:44 -0400 Edgar Wulf

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Vergil

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Devil May Cry 3 (2005)
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Twin brother of the game's main protagonist and a highly skilled swordsman, Vergil's movement of his katana, Yamato, is so fast in Devil May Cry 3 that he can deflect incoming bullets with it and, just like his brother, he possesses the ability to transform into a demon form, further improving his speed and strength. These qualities make Vergil a formidable foe in the numerous encounters against him.

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This concludes the list. Do you agree with any of the entries? Who would you add? Let us know in the comments below.

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If you can't get enough of badass video game characters, then check out this follow-up list. And for more fun compilations such as this one, stay tuned to GameSkinny.

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Samus Aran

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Metroid (1986)
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A bounty hunter best known for providing one of the biggest surprises in gaming history, Metroid's Samus traverses a fictional universe, exploring uncharted planets and tracking down space-pirates. She uses a powerful arm-cannon as her primary weapon and can turn herself into a morph-ball to evade incoming attacks or reach otherwise inaccessible locations. Whenever she defeats a particularly powerful foe in combat, she is able to gain its ability or improve an existing one.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/7/7/4/774395-76ea0.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/7/7/4/774395-76ea0.jpg","type":"slide","id":"182238","description":"

Raziel

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Legacy of Kain: Soul Reaver (1999)
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Once a vampire and a lieutenant to the most powerful among them -- Kain -- Soul Reaver's Raziel is sent to his death after being considered too threatening to Kain's position in the hierarchy. Stripped of his flesh and aesthetics, Raziel is resurrected by an old god, and now, in a wraith form, his thirst for blood has been replaced by consumption of souls. He's determined to exact revenge on his former comrades and on Kain himself, claiming their powers as his own.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/t/o/m/tomb-raider-game-wallpapers-underworld-wallpaper-wallbest-6dada.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/t/o/m/tomb-raider-game-wallpapers-underworld-wallpaper-wallbest-6dada.jpg","type":"slide","id":"182246","description":"

Lara Croft

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Tomb Raider (1996)
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This young lady needs no introduction; Tomb Raider's Lara is one of the most recognizable characters in gaming. Known for her athleticism, smarts, and signature dual pistols, she has been raiding tombs, uncovering long-lost artifacts, and breaking men's hearts for over two decades. She is skilled at translating ancient scripts and activating complex contraptions, and during combat, she relies on dexterity and stealth rather than brute force.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/2/a/b/2ab1f6eb-bb75-4dc2-b6e8-0471e0de3cc7-47b37.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/2/a/b/2ab1f6eb-bb75-4dc2-b6e8-0471e0de3cc7-47b37.jpg","type":"slide","id":"182249","description":"

Kratos

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God of War (2005)
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While not exactly the most likable character, God of War's Kratos deserves a spot simply by being a Greek-god-killing machine. His biggest asset is his unquenchable anger, and the many weapons he uses act mostly as stress-balls for him -- something to grip tightly. Should he ever find himself disarmed, he will tear the opponent's head off with his bare hands, which he actually did with Helios'. For Kratos, it was just a normal Monday.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/0/5/3/053374-dead-space-isaac-clarke-videogames-videogames-artwork-6b573.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/0/5/3/053374-dead-space-isaac-clarke-videogames-videogames-artwork-6b573.jpg","type":"slide","id":"182229","description":"

Isaac Clarke

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Dead Space (2008)
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Not your typical superhero, Dead Space's Isaac Clarke is an engineer who, along with a small crew, finds himself stranded on a seemingly abandoned starship after following its distress signal. Initially armed with nothing but a plasma cutter and, quite possibly, the coolest-looking suit ever made, he must battle through hordes of Necromorphs and uncover the source of their origin, acquiring military-grade weaponry as he traverses the dismal halls of the ship.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/7/2/7/727772-wwwwallpapersfancom-85c32.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/7/2/7/727772-wwwwallpapersfancom-85c32.jpg","type":"slide","id":"182235","description":"

Ciri

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The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt (2015)
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Cirilla Fiona Elen Riannon, or simply Ciri, is a carrier of powerful elder blood and, much like The Witcher 3's protagonist, Geralt, a trained witcher, which makes her a skilled sword fighter. She commands a unique blink ability, which allows her to teleport quickly around enemies and strike from behind. Due to her supernatural abilities, she is being pursued by The Wild Hunt, a group of elves whose intent is to take possession of her powers. Despite the odds, Ciri is able to overcome seemingly insurmountable adversaries, often all on her own.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/i/n/final-fantasy-wallpaper-auron-wallpapers-5dee5.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/i/n/final-fantasy-wallpaper-auron-wallpapers-5dee5.jpg","type":"slide","id":"182241","description":"

Auron

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Final Fantasy X (2001)
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An experienced warrior and a guardian to summoner Yuna, one of Final Fantasy X's protagonists, and formerly to her father. Auron carries an oversized katana in one hand and only unsheathes his other arm during combat to add more power behind each strike, which makes him command an intimidating presence even against the most formidable foes. The liquid in his flask, which is probably booze (definitely booze), is often used to ignite the katana for certain special attacks.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/a/l/b/albert-wesker-9fc25.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/a/l/b/albert-wesker-9fc25.jpg","type":"slide","id":"182242","description":"

Albert Wesker

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Resident Evil (1996)
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Killed by a tyrant whom he himself helped create, Resident Evil's Wesker survives thanks to a prototype virus circulating in his veins. As a result, he becomes the series' super-villain, possessing incredible speed and strength, and an even greater ego, the combination of which, apparently, allows him to catch incoming missiles with his hands. He never misses an opportunity to mock his opponents and is only willing to spend no more than seven minutes of his precious time to deal with them.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/a/d/a/adam-jensen-with-combat-rifle-a0c70.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/a/d/a/adam-jensen-with-combat-rifle-a0c70.jpg","type":"slide","id":"182230","description":"

Adam Jensen

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Deus Ex: Human Revolution (2011)
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After being killed by members of a black ops team during an attack on the company he works for, Deus Ex: Human Revolution's Adam Jensen is brought back to life via advanced body augmentations (even though he didn't ask for it). Armed with resolve and powerful new tools at his disposal -- including various vision enhancements and the ability to turn himself invisible or punch people through walls -- he sets out to uncover the truth behind the attack and take revenge on the group that destroyed his life.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/v/i/d/video-game-characters-wallpaper-e54d4.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/v/i/d/video-game-characters-wallpaper-e54d4.jpg","type":"slide","id":"182278","description":"

(This is Part 1 of the compilation; for Part 2 follow this link)

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The world of games is saturated with varied characters. There are brave, cute, intelligent, strong characters, and then there are badasses -- characters who stand out, whether due to their physical or mental attributes, their manner of speech, or their unique appearance. Regardless, they usually don't require the assistance of others to succeed and can conquer hardships all by themselves, should the need arise. This list features 10 of the most suitable characters in the category, and it was assembled based on the following criteria:

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  • Only one character per franchise
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  • The character must be playable at any point in the particular series or be part of a playable party
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Each entry will contain the name of the character, the game they first appeared in and its release year, as well as a brief description. Click through to view the characters in alphabetical, not necessarily numerical, order.

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Disclaimer: The writer's opinions herein are his own and might not coincide with those of the other 7+ billion people living on Earth.

"}]]]>
The 20 Most Hilarious Arby's Video Game References https://www.gameskinny.com/vb7ih/the-20-most-hilarious-arbys-video-game-references https://www.gameskinny.com/vb7ih/the-20-most-hilarious-arbys-video-game-references Wed, 21 Mar 2018 12:25:43 -0400 Ty Arthur

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It's a good bet we'll continue to see new anime and gaming references pop up in the months ahead, as this is an ad strategy that seems to be working, and there are plenty of games and shows they haven't covered yet.

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I'm actually surprised we haven't seen a Secret Of Mana post yet, considering how they have been on top of the re-releases of classic games in recent months.

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What was your favorite Arby's gaming reference, and what box art creation do you hope to see come up next? Let us know in the comments!

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RIP AND TEAR

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Game: Doom

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Is there ANYTHING this crew can't do with those damn boxes?!? It doesn't even look like they had to paint on the red lower sections but just used the colored portions of the sandwich holders to make it fit perfectly. The only way they could have made this better is if it was an ultra-fast moving video with a chainsaw at the end.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/m/a/r/mario-2d6b1.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/m/a/r/mario-2d6b1.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181346","description":"

Goomba Squad! Moooove out!!!

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Series: Super Mario Bros.

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Those classic Goombas 'n Boos will always hold a hallowed place in gaming history, even as the series expands out and drastically alters the gameplay with newer iterations like Super Mario Odyssey. That adorable cardboard Goomba has got me thinking a weekend family art project may be in the works!

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/s/o/u/south-b4f9c.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/s/o/u/south-b4f9c.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181345","description":"

He's the symbol this town needs

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Game: South Park: The Fractured But Whole

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I don't think anyone expected the South Park series to hit its stride with an RPG, but what started with Obsidian's Stick Of Truth and continued with Ubisoft's take in The Fractured But Whole may well be the best games in the franchise. The paper cut-out style of the TV series also clearly lends itself well to cardboard box art!

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/a/l/fallout-5640e.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/a/l/fallout-5640e.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181348","description":"

You've come a long way, baby

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Series: Fallout

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I'm calling it -- fast food sauce packet art is going to become a recognized thing. I mean, if Vincent Castiglia can paint with blood, why not Arby's sauce?

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This saucy rendition of the Fallout stat system also just reminded me that I'm 95 hours into Fallout 4 but still haven't actually finished the main storyline after getting side tracked by all the DLC. Nobody ruin the ending for me.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/a/s/castlevania-dcdab.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/a/s/castlevania-dcdab.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181344","description":"

The morning sun has vanquished the horrible night

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Series: Castlevania

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Considering you can eat burgers, mushrooms, and even whole turkey legs throughout this series, the idea of Simon's Lunch isn't too far fetched. The best part about this whole thing (other than the box whip), is that one genius fan immediately commented with this exchange:

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"Fry monster! You don't belong in this world!"

"It was not by my hand I was again made fresh. I was ordered by humans who wish to fillet me tribute!"

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"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/s/h/a/shadow-e67bf.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/s/h/a/shadow-e67bf.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181332","description":"

How's your grip strength?

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Game: Shadow of the Colossus

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The wisdom of eating a tower of meat that size is definitely in question, but this is an absolutely perfect mixing of game and fast food imagery to get an idea across. It's clear just from a glance that he's about to fight a colossus, and now I'm kind of wondering if I have what it takes to tackle the meat mountain.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/h/r/chronotrigger-3e0d9.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/h/r/chronotrigger-3e0d9.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181330","description":"

You might call this a post for 90's gamers, but we think of it as millennial fare

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Game: Chrono Trigger

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Featuring dancing robot Gato from the millennial fair, this Chrono Trigger-based caption was pure genius, and it immediately took me back to Saturday afternoon game sessions from my childhood.

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The sad, cash-grab PC port might be garbage, but the original SNES version is still one of the best RPGs of all time, and I'm absolutely about to load up ZSNES and replay it tonight.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/k/i/n/kingdomhearts-155e4.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/k/i/n/kingdomhearts-155e4.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181329","description":"

Sure, you've seen it before, but now it has Aqua.

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Game: Kingdom Hearts 2.8

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How can there be so many games in this series, yet none of them have managed to be Kingdom Hearts III yet? This post was kind of torture for the fans who have been patiently waiting for the next real sequel, although it did hilariously spur on a slew of photo responses in which diners set their keys next to a sandwich.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/l/i/f/lifeisst-995d2.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/l/i/f/lifeisst-995d2.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181347","description":"

Lunch is Strange

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Game: Life Is Strange

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How do you say so much with so little? Even without the caption, it would have been clear what was happening here. Although sadly, the reference did leave the post wide open to all sorts of comments about wanting to rewind time back before eating that meal.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/g/r/a/gravityrush-abe22.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/g/r/a/gravityrush-abe22.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181316","description":"

Overcome the impossible

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Game: Gravity Rush

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This Vita title wasn't exactly well known to the masses at large, so it was sort of surprising to see a sideways image of Kat pop up in the Arby's feed, but clearly the fans were happy to see this lesser-known action-adventure title get a little fast food love. If you remember this game and want to see more, be sure to leave a comment!

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/n/i/e/nier-51194.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/n/i/e/nier-51194.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181327","description":"

9929 years in the future …

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Game: Nier Automata

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This inexplicably awesome (and constantly genre-hopping) game managed to shake up the GOTY expectations early in 2017 with its combination of androids, giant swords, and killer robot enemies.

\n

The swords and drones are spot-on here, although I'm kind of wondering if 2B as a "shake" is supposed to be a reference to her exposed behind throughout the game....

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/f/7/ff7chocobo-231f3.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/f/7/ff7chocobo-231f3.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181326","description":"

Which is it, wark or kweh?

\n

Series: Final Fantasy

\n

Obviously it's kweh, you uncultured swine! OK, I guess it can be both. Seriously though, that sandwich box chocobo is a thing of beauty. I shudder to think of the amount of work that had to go into crafting this guy, and I'm a little disturbed by the connotation of the chicken sandwiches next to him.... Maybe one day we'll get a saddled Chocobo creation in a Final Fantasy Tactics style?

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/j/e/t/jetset-c0552.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/j/e/t/jetset-c0552.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181320","description":"

Understand, understand, the concept of love.

\n

Game: Jet Set Radio Future

\n

Whoa, they are going old school and fairly obscure with this one, as the original game came out in 2000, and Jet Set Radio Future came out in '02. I'm hoping the resurrection of interest in this series from the social media posts might spur on some news soon, as Sega has been showing some proclivity towards resurrecting older IPs.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/s/w/i/switch-769dc.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/s/w/i/switch-769dc.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181331","description":"

Beefy AND portable. We dig it.

\n

Console: Switch

\n

Speaking of the Switch, you had to know this one was coming, right? I never would have thought "Nintendo console = roast beef sandwiches," but somehow they made the connection with the beefy/portable comment. Those adorable little Switch Joy-Con buttons are also kind of amazing.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/m/e/t/metroid-45f44.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/m/e/t/metroid-45f44.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181319","description":"

The last Metroid is in captivity. The galaxy is at peace.

\n

Game: Metroid

\n

Another totally classic and retro reference, this one takes us way, waaaaay back to the NES days of the earliest Samus adventures. Not only does this post successfully make me want some curly fries, but now it's got me wondering: When is that Metroid Prime 4 finally going to show up for the Switch?

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/r/a/crash-eaa67.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/r/a/crash-eaa67.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181318","description":"

So glad he crashed the party. 

\n

Game: Crash Bandicoot N.Sane Trilogy

\n

For a generation that grew up with Spyro and Crash Bandicoot, news of the remastered N.Sane Trilogy was like a breath of fresh air, and it didn't take long for word to spread on social media. The TNT boxes are fine and all, but it's really the cardboard sleeve gloves that push this one over the top and show off the level of detail.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/z/e/l/zelda-b3689.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/z/e/l/zelda-b3689.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181317","description":"

It’s dangerous to go alone! Take this.

\n

Game: The Legend Of Zelda

\n

While Breath of the Wild might be the only thing Zelda fans care about right now, it's the classics that will always be remembered. They didn't even have to make a cardboard sword for the reference to work. Three triangles tells us Triforce, and in this case, a pretty darn tasty one made out of fried potatoes!

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/t/o/m/tombraider-d04f6.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/t/o/m/tombraider-d04f6.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181314","description":"

As one adventure begins, another waits in the shadows. She's one tough cookie!

\n

Game: Tomb Raider

\n

The cookie causing the eclipse just brings this one together (but who goes to a fast food place for the cookies?). With the pickaxe in hand, this is clearly meant to evoke the newer reboot series that the new movie is based off, rather than original tank top and shorts Lara Croft.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/m/o/n/monsterhunter-8700a.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/m/o/n/monsterhunter-8700a.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181342","description":"

Rally the crew; we're going after the big ones

\n

Game: Monster Hunter World

\n

You ever look at that really artistic spray paint wall graffiti and wonder, "How in the hell did they do that and get such amazing can control?" Yeah, now I'm trying to figure out how someone has such amazing Arby's BBQ sauce packet control to create the Monster Hunter guild symbol! Just one slight twitch of the wrist and this could have been a disaster.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/o/r/fortnitesneakingintomobile-626f9.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/o/r/fortnitesneakingintomobile-626f9.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181313","description":"

Sneaking into that Mobile Beta

\n

Game: Fortnite

\n

The reigning Battle Royale king Fortnite landing on iOS devices is the current talk of the town (with Android users more than a little jealous), so of course Arby's jumped on that immediately.

\n

This one has it all -- the bush that players love to be while sneaking around the map, and a reference to the difficulty in actually making it into the mobile beta at this point!

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/o/v/cov-0ab1f.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/o/v/cov-0ab1f.jpg","type":"slide","id":"181341","description":"

You'd usually think of Taco Bell or Mountain Dew as the gaming champs, but a certain roast beef-obsessed fast food chain is creeping up and taking over with a marketing department that clearly loves anime and gaming culture.

\n

Social media marketing is a vital part of any company's advertising strategy, and Arby's made a conscious choice to change tactics away from "buy this meal for this price" posts to much more engaging and organic images that people actually want to share.

\n

Every new post features a hilarious composition of reliable comment types -- a few clueless people trying to puzzle out what that reference means, super fans who are in heaven, a call for the team to get a raise, and backlash from the bored Facebook and Twitter crowds who are upset people are talking about video games for some reason. Every now and again, cheers of joy will erupt in the comments when pop culture references show up that a wider range of people actually understand, such as ClueAliens, or Discworld.

\n

Despite going really obscure with some of the video game references, the Arby's team has created an advertising juggernaut here because they perfectly meet at the intersection of gaming, nerd culture, and crafting fanatics. Some of these posts ahead are truly works of art that clearly took an absurd amount of time to construct out of Arby's boxes, bags, and even sauce packets!

\n

Note: All photo rights belong to Arby's -- we're just appreciating these perfect references. 

"}]]]>
Who Are These Dream Friends in Kirby Star Allies? https://www.gameskinny.com/tkurx/who-are-these-dream-friends-in-kirby-star-allies https://www.gameskinny.com/tkurx/who-are-these-dream-friends-in-kirby-star-allies Thu, 15 Mar 2018 12:37:28 -0400 Erroll Maas

During the March 2018 Nintendo Direct, new information for Kirby Star Allies, the pink puffball's debut on the Nintendo Switch, was revealed. This included playable Dream Friends which players can download through a free future update and use as allies in the game. Newer fans of Kirby might be unfamiliar with this group of characters, but they have all appeared in previous Kirby titles -- most notably Kirby's Dream Land 2 for the original Game Boy -- as well as cameos in plenty of other Nintendo games. So who exactly are these returning friends?

 

Rick

Rick is a large hamster who made his first appearance in Kirby's Dream Land 2 alongside other animal friends. He became friends with Kirby after being saved from a group of enemies. Rick can be used to traverse hazardous terrain and doesn't slip on icy platforms. Since Rick is twice the size of Kirby, he can't fit into small spaces, but he can wall jump and defeat enemies by jumping on them. Rick can also inhale enemies, and although he can't gain abilities from this technique, he can combine his abilities with Kirby's for an increased variety of attacks. For Kirby's Dreamland 3 on the Super Nintendo, Rick's inhale ability is replaced by a charging attack. This is where Rick's love interest, Pick, was also introduced.

 

Coo

Coo is an owl, and like Rick, first appeared in Kirby's Dream Land 2. Coo has the ability to fly, which can give players a great advantage in certain situations. Additionally, Coo is strong enough to fly through powerful wind currents. Coo can also combine with Kirby's abilities to use stronger attacks.

 
Kine

Kine is an ocean sunfish who also first appeared in Kirby's Dreamland 2. Kine can help Kirby traverse through water and swim through strong currents, allowing Kirby to reach otherwise inaccessible areas. Kine can be used on land as well, but being a fish, he isn't very useful. In Kirby's Dream Land 3, Kine gained the ability to jump on smaller enemies and had an increase in speed on land, making him just as fast as the other characters. Like the other animal friends, Kine can merge with Kirby's abilities for more attacks.

Gooey

The slime creature Gooey first appeared in Kirby's Dream Land 2, found in bags after defeating specific mid-bosses after the animal friend originally found in the bag is already paired with Kirby. Gooey restores Kirby's health when found. There is also a rare female version of Gooey who grants Kirby an extra life.

Gooey became a playable ally in Kirby's Dreamland 3 and can be controlled by a CPU or second player. Gooey can also eat enemies to gain their abilities, but unlike Kirby, can also use this ability underwater and can't inhale two enemies at once.

 
Marx

Marx first appeared as a supposed ally and later antagonist in the Milky Way Wishes game in Kirby Super Star on the Super Nintendo and its Nintendo DS remake, Kirby Super Star: Ultra. Marx is the only former antagonist -- besides mainstays Meta Knight and King Dedede -- to be announced as a dream friend so far. He appears in his first form in Kirby Star Allies.

More Allies to Come?

Kirby: Star Allies may not be a monumental change for the Kirby franchise, but at least it remembers its roots. Will more characters return? Will we see Adeleine (also known as Ado) from Kirby 64: The Crystal Shards, or former antagonists like the Squeak Squad from Kirby: Squeak Squad return to help Kirby out? Kirby fans will just have to wait and see for more characters to appear through future updates.

]]>
Can We Get a Seiken Densetsu 3 Remake? Please? https://www.gameskinny.com/6zgvq/can-we-get-a-seiken-densetsu-3-remake-please https://www.gameskinny.com/6zgvq/can-we-get-a-seiken-densetsu-3-remake-please Fri, 02 Mar 2018 13:27:21 -0500 buymymixtape123

In this generation of gaming we can expect to see a remaster or remake of any game from the distant past or from the last generation of consoles. Remastered games like Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy or Final Fantasy X/X2 gave us the same experience as the original, but with better graphics: resolution and cut content from the original release.

One of the recent games to get this remastered treatment is the popular Super Nintendo RPG Secret of Mana, which is the second and most popular installment in the Seiken Densetsu series. As Secret of Mana gets most of love in the series, however the third installment in the series - Seiken Densetsu 3 - deserves just as much attention and a remake as well.

                            Let's just hope it is better than this remaster 

Seiken Densetsu 3 is an action RPG made by Square Enix. In Seiken, you choose between six different characters that are trying to obtain the Mana Sword that will help defeat the main antagonists - the God Beasts. In addition, the characters you pick at the start all have their own story line that contributes to the over-arching story of the game.

What made Seiken so great is that instead of changing everything around what Secret of Mana laid out, it expanded upon it. It updated the combat, making it better than its predecessor. The graphics and sprite animations were better and sharper. It also had more classes and characters than Secret of Mana, giving it more replay value just to try out the different characters.        

Seiken Densetsu 3 was never released outside of Japan, so it would be obvious why its predecessors - Secret of Mana and Final Fantasy Adventure -get so much praise and notoriety since it was released to the western audience too. Final Fantasy Adventure also had a remake on the Game Boy Advance called Sword of Mana. If the rest of the series can be shown some love and appreciation than why can't Seiken Densetsu 3?

It can be said that Seiken Densetsu 3 built a following here in the West. People have made English translations of the action RPG, making it accessible to many Westerns who do not understand Japanese. Furthermore, a lot of people enjoy this game over the Secret of Mana, and believe it is the better game.

With this all being said, Seiken Densetsu 3 deserves to have a remake. By remaking it, you are giving it a wider audience than it already has. Square Enix should definitively get on this, especially if they want to make some extra cash. This leads me to ask of do you think that Seiken Densetsu 3 should be remastered or should it stay a relic of the past?       

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Why Mega Man X Needs to Come Back https://www.gameskinny.com/mwqhj/why-mega-man-x-needs-to-come-back https://www.gameskinny.com/mwqhj/why-mega-man-x-needs-to-come-back Fri, 09 Feb 2018 13:30:37 -0500 Lee Forgione

One of Capcom's many dormant franchises, Mega Man X has not seen a new entry in the series since 2005's X8. With the recent announcement of Mega Man 11, I started to wonder if X could ever make a comeback as well. I've always been fond of the X series. It takes the original Mega Man formula and mixes it up with an edgier story and vastly superior gameplay mechanics.

The iconic Mega Man X in all his glory

​In the same way that Mega Man went back to its 8-bit roots with the ninth and tenth entries in the series, the same could be done for Mega Man X. Having a ninth entry made in a 16-bit style would be a huge comeback for X and Zero, especially in today's market, where throwbacks to retro graphics are becoming more and more popular and appreciated. The X series did okay on the PlayStation, with X4 being the best of the bunch. It retained the feel of the SNES games while adding new features such as rescuing reploids (the name given to androids modeled after X) and changing the flow of the story depending on certain tasks you accomplished. X then took a rocky shift into the PlayStation 2 with the seventh and eighth games. X7 went for a half-2D, half-3D approach, and it just didn't work. The controls were clunky, they introduced a new throwaway character named Axl, and it didn't feel very much like an X game. X8 ditched the 3D aspect for a 2.5D sidescrolling design, but again, it felt like a departure from the fast-paced action of the first six games.

The first X game reinvigorated a dying series by giving it an edgier story, a rocking soundtrack, and new moves like dashing and wall-jumping. These new moves added so much more depth to the Mega Man formula and made gameplay a lot more strategic, especially during boss fights. These changes were just what Mega Man needed to become relevant again, and with new games that give off an X vibe, such as Azure Gunvolt Striker and 20XX, it's a crime that we haven't seen a new retro-style X game. Rather than waste development resources on collections of old games, why don't they focus on something new instead? Sure, Mega Man 11 is on its way, but Mega Man Legends 3 was slated to be released on the 3DS but was scrapped for no reason. The severe lack of new Mega Man content led its original creator, Keiji Inafune, to Kickstart a terrible game, Mighty No. 9, which looks like Mega Man but is in reality a disappointing clone with awful voice acting and even a typo or two in its in-game text. 

​Though it's nice to see the original Mega Man returning this year, that series died off a long time ago. Its controls are simple, dated, and just not all that fun to play. X is the series that perfected the Mega Man formula in ways that make it memorable to so many people. The original Mega Man games had simple plot points of good versus evil, whereas X's story brought in more mature story elements such as humans co-existing with reploids and the controversy of whether machines should have free will or not. There's also the dynamic relationship between X and Zero. It's interesting to see them fight so close together against the Mavericks even though Zero's creation is what started the entire conflict. It would be neat to explore the Sigma virus and the many forms it's taken over the years in one last X game. Considering X8 ended on a cliff hanger, with Axl being infected by something placed in his helmet by the game's antagonist, Lumine, that could absolutely play into the plot of a potential X9

​It's a shame that X and Zero have only seen cameos and appearances in Marvel Vs. Capcom games since their last adventure over a decade ago. If the characters are still being used to this day, why not bring them back to their roots like so many other games are doing? Not only would die-hard fans appreciate a new 16-bit X game, but new generations of gamers could be turned onto such a memorable series. Here's to hoping Capcom will attempt to revive one of its best series and give X a proper sendoff. One can hope.

]]>
7 Best Bosses in Final Fantasy https://www.gameskinny.com/judqm/7-best-bosses-in-final-fantasy https://www.gameskinny.com/judqm/7-best-bosses-in-final-fantasy Tue, 06 Feb 2018 12:22:41 -0500 wlkrjesse

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Boss fights are designed to be memorable because great villains always stick out in your head, no matter what the reason is, and that's the beauty of a boss fight. It can range anywhere from the brutal simplicity of an overwhelming foe to a climactic battle that caps off the entirety of the game.

And sometimes, you're lucky enough to get both.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/9/1/0/9106880526-97c5b70a47-c1846.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/9/1/0/9106880526-97c5b70a47-c1846.jpg","type":"slide","id":"178681","description":"

Kefka Palazzo

\n
Final Fantasy VI
\n

The greatest video game bosses, like any villain, are ones that are made and not born. I find an end boss far more engrossing if I can see what they were like before they were such a horrible fear, and Final Fantasy VI is a documentary on Kefka.

If we break down the actual gameplay, Kefka's fight isn't really phenomenal in terms of raw gameplay. What makes this fight insane is we know Kefka. You know Kefka. Think about who he was when you first saw him. A weird little jester? Almost like an Ultros? And what is he now? God. Halfway through the game, Kefka turns into God.

I'll never forget this fight simply for that weight behind it, the weight that Kefka accomplished his goal. Kefka isn't Sephiroth, a tragic mistake who just couldn't accept his faith. Nor is he an Ozma, a natural force that you were unfortunate enough to disturb. Kefka is the God of Magic, and his rule is marked by an unstable disgust for the world around him. He got his hands on the statues of the Warring Triad and made the conscious decision to plunge the world into darkness. And he started as a joke, a character who the game he is in seems to care little for.

You really can feel a sense of agency behind Kefka, almost like Lucas in Mother 3. Lucas is NOT supposed to be the protagonist of Mother 3. Flint is. All you hear about at the start of the game is how much reverence everyone in Tazmily has for Flint, similar to Ness at the start of Earthbound. But Flint isn't the protagonist. Lucas has to accept this reluctant role, one that he is very much not suited for. The game tells us as much when it calls him a crybaby at every turn. Kefka is NOT supposed to be the villain. Gestahl is. Why would it be the weird clown, right? You just never see it coming. The story is written in such a way that it feels like it was hijacked. Kefka's rise to power (at halfway through the game) is such a fantastic bait-and-switch. And having to climb that tower to get to Kefka on his throne, this Luciferian figure? There's really nothing quite like it. 

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/o/z/m/ozma-9ab86.png","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/o/z/m/ozma-9ab86.png","type":"slide","id":"178676","description":"

Ozma

\n
Final Fantasy IX, Final Fantasy XIV
\n

My favorite entry on this list: The Ball.

Ozma is strange, and I think legitimately frightening when you give it some thought. Really think about Ozma. A completely optional fight that you only encounter if you trade in years off your life to complete the Chocobo Hot and Cold treasure hunt side quest, which is the longest side quest in Final Fantasy IX, which is already full of long side quests because it's a Final Fantasy game. Once you've successfully cashed in your human energy for a digital reward in an old, old PlayStation game, you are granted admission to a cave tucked away in the back of the Air Garden. And there's Ozma.

Ozma doesn't talk. Ozma doesn't heal. Ozma does nothing but try to end your life. Just non-stop, never-ceasing dull thuds coming straight at you and your party the moment you're in the same zip code like nuclear god damn bombs. And Ozma is aiming for the throat. Ozma casts Curse? You're dead. Meteor? Dead. Have a party member susceptible to Lv5 Death? Not anymore because they're dead. Or it'll just cast Death and skip the formalities altogether. Oh, and Ozma has counter attacks, so watch out for Berserk and Curaga because they're in the mix once it hits a certain HP threshold. This thing has no brakes and no interest in explaining itself to you or anyone else, so your victory must be earned.

What I find especially cool about Ozma is how little we know about it. Just to reiterate, this is not the final boss or a mandatory boss or anything. Ozma is a completely 100% optional fight. Mene warns you when you approach the cave and says he "feels a strange presence...not of this world," but that's it. Eidolons are creatures that come from people telling legends, similar to personas, but Ozma is just a colored sphere. Maybe it's a legend so old that everyone who exists has simply forgotten what it is, and it's attacking you because you came into its home as the first visitor in eons, Shadow of the Colossus style.

Creepy, beautiful, mysterious, and a giant pain in the ass, Ozma certainly makes its ancestor Warmech proud.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/7/0/6/7067385025-365233298d-556f9.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/7/0/6/7067385025-365233298d-556f9.jpg","type":"slide","id":"178678","description":"

Gilgamesh

\n
Final Fantasy V - XIII-2
\n

Gilgamesh is a combination of Ultros and Goku, and that's OK with me.

All he wants to do is fight -- so much so that he'll follow you into different games after being sucked into a dimensional portal. It is this tasteful repetition, not unlike our octopus friend from earlier, that makes Gilgamesh so memorable. However, what really lands him on the list is the fight in Final Fantasy XIII-2.

Gilgamesh being back, with yet another new arrangement of his theme song Pokey's March style, and ready to get right into it with you and the party. But this battle isn't just another fun but silly fight with Gilgamesh; it's a celebration of the character and the series as a whole. He comes equipped with famous swords from the Final Fantasy series, fourth wall breaks and references galore.

Gilgamesh has been with the series since Final Fantasy V, and to see such a lovingly crafted fight for him shows a real level of reverence for how far Final Fantasy has come since then. This is Final Fantasy's Liquid Ocelot v. Snake.

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Safer-Sephiroth

\n
Final Fantasy VII
\n

It's impossible not to have Safer-Sephiroth (or Seraph-Sephiroth if we believe the mistranslation fan theory) on this list somewhere. He's legendary, a member of the Ivy League of boss battle alumni along with Jubileus from Bayonetta, Liquid Ocelot in Metal Gear Solid 4, and those ducks that Warren Robinett claims are dragons from Adventure.

There's nothing I can tell you about Safer-Sephiroth that you don't already know. He looks like Tetsuo by way of Angel's Egg and can hurt you with a short film Supernova. One-Winged Angel is one of the most recognizable songs in video game history, and it was the first Final Fantasy song to include vocals.

While some people might say that Safer-Sephiroth has lost some bite so many years later, I disagree. The buildup to this fight is excellent -- you've spent all this time grasping at Jenova's clones, and then, when you finally come face to face with the man himself, you aren't shown a radiant, heavenly beauty but are instead confronted with a twisted quasi deity crafted out of jagged polygons. It's haunting, but you're unable to look away.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/w/a/r/warmech-ff1-nes-aa91e.png","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/w/a/r/warmech-ff1-nes-aa91e.png","type":"slide","id":"178683","description":"

Warmech

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Final Fantasy
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Whether you prefer "Warmech" or "Death Machine," just don't call it the wrong thing, or it might show up at the worst possible time.

You only have a 3-in-64 chance to encounter Warmech, and it only appears when you get into a random battle in the Flying Fortress, but I love everything about it: the weird choice of salmon pink for the color scheme, its one big eye just right in the center, always looking slightly up and to the corner. It reminds me of a bad early-gen Pokemon, but it certainly doesn't fight like one. Warmech is a beast, and it's called the first "superboss" in Final Fantasy, referring to optional fights against massively difficult monster. It boasts the same HP as the end boss, not to mention the ability to regenerate 5% of its massive health pool every round. Not only that, but it also has access to Atomize, an incredibly strong non-elemental spell that hits the entire party.

The fantastic thing about Warmech is that it's this odd robot monster that launches nukes, and Final Fantasy 1 takes place in a medieval fantasy world. This would be like if in the original Dungeons & Dragons, there was a secret entry in the Monster Manual for Tinker the Robot.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/n/e/o/neoexdeath-ffv-ios-9098d.png","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/n/e/o/neoexdeath-ffv-ios-9098d.png","type":"slide","id":"178673","description":"

Neo Exdeath

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Final Fantasy V
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While Exdeath's gimmick of wanting to end reality by bringing the existence as a whole into the void was never really the most compelling goal (in Final Fantasy V, a game that wasn't really all that compelling to begin with), Neo Exdeath makes the list solely on the virtue of looking like a high-ranking Berserk apostle. Just look at this dude. This is monster design by way of the electric kool-aid acid test. There's a skeleton, he's got some kind of the Predator in there, a bunch of ladies, and a big ol' bat up top to bring it all back home. Neo Exdeath looks like something Ultraman would fight if Ultraman was created by Jan Švankmajer.

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Throw in the fact that the Neo Exdeath boss fight actually has separate attack patterns that revolve around his jigsawed appearance, and it's a neat battle.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/5/4/7/5472737334-ec2fba7e8e-aa96a.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/5/4/7/5472737334-ec2fba7e8e-aa96a.jpg","type":"slide","id":"178674","description":"

Ultros

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Final Fantasy VI, Final Fantasy XII-2, Final Fantasy XIV, and a whole mess of other appearances.
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Writing in RPGs can be tricky. Jokes don't always age well, and a joke character can very easily tread into stale. In Final Fantasy VI, I believe that Ultros comfortably falls into the former and not the latter.

Truly an anomaly, Ultros has no reason for doing what he's doing other than to just mess with the party, and it just never gets old. I have no idea why "big purple octopus who keeps threatening to eat the player" works as well as it does, but it does. It sticks, and they play it just long enough. The sixth entry in the Final Fantasy series is one of the heavier ones in terms of story, so Ultros' comic relief role always comes off as more entertaining than annoying.

That being said, he's no Negative Man, but who is?

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/1/5/0/15044695915-3e361dd408-37ce7.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/1/5/0/15044695915-3e361dd408-37ce7.jpg","type":"slide","id":"178814","description":"

The video game end boss, what should be a great achievement in monster design, is a dying art form. Games are always changing, bringing new ways to confront aspects of humanity that need to be addressed, and these are not always in the shape of ghoulish fantasy visions.

Final Fantasy, for all of its ups and downs, never forgot the importance of truly climactic end bosses. They're able to both satiate a desire for terrible beasts and, at times, bring about an emotional depth. Here are seven that I think deserve particular praise.

"}]]]>
"Classic" Consoles: Showpieces or the Retro-Gamer Endgame? https://www.gameskinny.com/55lns/classic-consoles-showpieces-or-the-retro-gamer-endgame https://www.gameskinny.com/55lns/classic-consoles-showpieces-or-the-retro-gamer-endgame Fri, 22 Dec 2017 16:00:59 -0500 PureXT

If there's one thing you can't deny about "Classic" consoles, it's that no matter whether you're a die-hard fan who's been playing on the platform since day one, or a youngster just getting into retro consoles, you'd probably give anything to own one.

Packaged into a compact little box that fits in your hand is the ultimate emulation machine, both by how perfectly it plays the games, and by the never-before-seen exclusives it offers (Star Fox 2!). No matter how much you try, you could probably never get this kind of genuine feel on any other form of emulation, be it on an old throwaway console or your top-tier gaming PC.

But packed with only 20-30 games (or more, in the case of AtGames' consoles, but I won't touch on those in this article), are these consoles really made for play, or are they more of a showpiece?

To start off, it's pretty safe to say that these consoles weren't made for the same type of people who buy a Mario Kart 8 Deluxe Switch bundle to play with their friends on drunken nights, or for kids who want to play the newest Splatoon to fight over clashing opinions about their favorite condiment or sweet snack. These were made for people who either loved these consoles from day one or for those who love the look and feel of retro games.

And this is what is most important to note when talking about these consoles. They aren't supposed to give you edge-of-your-seat action scenes or killer plot twists. They're built to give you that cozy feeling you get when you see the opening of Yoshi's Island, followed by the realization that you'll be subjected to hours of baby Mario's high pitched cries. They're there to make you remember when you beat that pesky Zelda dungeon for the first time, no matter if it was 20 years or 2 months ago. They're the staple of an era that has passed, and an ode to it. 

So at this point you might just think I'm padding the article, and that this is where the juice of it comes in. But it isn't. There is no "Juice". At the end of the day, the consoles can be either. They're what you make of them. You can gather your friends and bask in the glory of the original Earthbound's trippy 16-bit visuals on your widescreen TV, or you can have your duo of time machines watch over you from a high-up shelf. Either way, every time you look at them, you'll remember that they're where it all started, and you'll remember all the great times you had with the games that are on them. No matter if showpieces or time wasters, they serve their purpose. They radiate nostalgia, and that's all they have to do for us to love them.

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10 Epic Mario vs. Bowser Boss Battles https://www.gameskinny.com/iibzx/10-epic-mario-vs-bowser-boss-battles https://www.gameskinny.com/iibzx/10-epic-mario-vs-bowser-boss-battles Thu, 30 Nov 2017 14:12:48 -0500 ReadyPlayerPaige

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10. Super Mario Odyssey

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One of the hottest and most trending games ever developed by Nintendo, Super Mario Odyssey finds Mario and Bowser at it once again. This time, Mario is out to stop Bowser from marrying the princess. Decked out in wedding attire, Bowser's hat is equipped with punching gloves at which Mario can toss Cappy in order to seize control. Avoiding the traditional fire breath in addition to other hats and tail swipes, Mario must get up close and unleash a barrage of punches at Bowser to send him into an electric fence. After a few successful attempts, Bowser is knocked unconscious, Peach is free, and the wedding is over.

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---

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Which Mario vs. Bowser battle is your favorite? Post your comments below, and thanks for reading!

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9. Super Mario 3D World  

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Bowser ups the ante in Super Mario 3D World, using a magical bell to transform himself into Meowser. In the final encounter of this game, Mario must scale the tower in order to save the magical fairies in Meowser's clutches. While Mario scales the tower, he needs to watch out for the sneaky Meowser's attacks. He can attack from sliding down, climbing up, swiping his tail, and bursting the tower and clawing him. After scaling up the tower midway, he knocks off Meowser standing on a POW box. Mario scales the building at super speed using a pipe, only to see Meowser cloning more enemies. Once Mario reaches the top, he has to knock Meowser off a bigger POW box while avoiding fireballs. After successfully doing so, Meowser flies into the air and explodes into fireworks, setting the captive fairies free.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/49886cf3d2eb7e0a981bb7e440563897.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/49886cf3d2eb7e0a981bb7e440563897.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"11662","description":"

8. Super Mario Galaxy 2

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In Super Mario Galaxy 2, Mario and Bowser are at it again in space -- only this time, Bowser bought the heavy artillery. A mega-sized Bowser plans to smash Mario with his super fist, which Mario must avoid along with asteroid balls and electric balls. Luckily, Bowser gets his fist stuck in the moon, which allows Mario to walk on the asteroid balls and use them to his advantage. After stunning Bowser a couple of times, it looks like the battle is over. However, Bowser is tricky as always and finds a way to return to the battlefield. One last encounter sees Mario walking on the asteroid balls with plans to defeat Bowser one last time, which he does successfully. The dark galaxy world returns to normal, and Peach and Mario are happily reunited.

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"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/60a74ed0ed59809f1b8b7523157dce50.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/60a74ed0ed59809f1b8b7523157dce50.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"11661","description":"

7. Super Mario Galaxy

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Mario and Bowser battles go into zero-gravity mode in Super Mario Galaxy. Here, the longtime foes fight in space, which makes things much more interesting. On three separate moons, Mario must use his speed and maneuvers to attack his nemesis. On the first moon, Mario has to avoid Bowser's attacks. Then, Bowser turns into a rolling asteroid, which allows Mario to attack him by punching his face. Afterwards, Mario must use green, balloon-like objects to attack Bowser. However, he must avoid Bowser as he transforms into a spike ball trying to run over poor Mario. Finally, on the last moon, Mario must avoid fireballs, a spike ball, and being crushed. Fortunately, the moon is filled with lava, and if Bowser lands in the crystal-filled lava, it will burn him, allowing Mario to attack. Successfully defeating Bowser sends him to the lava below and allows Mario to fly away with the star.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/ec252f794a94415cc1d165c2424bdaca.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/ec252f794a94415cc1d165c2424bdaca.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"11660","description":"

6. New Super Mario Bros. Wii

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Returning to his roots of platform gameplay but now with 3D graphics, Mario once again faces his nemesis Bowser in New Super Mario Bros. Wii. Mario must rescue Peach from Bowser by avoiding his attacks and triggering a button that retracts the bridge, sending Bowser to his doom. At first it looks like Mario wins the battle, but it appears the princess was the wizard all along. Fooling Mario, the wizard uses his powers to make Bowser 10x bigger. Now running for his life and avoiding the gigantic Bowser's attacks, Mario sees Peach and a large trigger on the other side. After smashing the trigger, the lava begins to decrease, and Bowser is sent along for the ride. Finally, the princess is let out of her cage and reunited with Mario. 

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/9b5e961fa686b01823983df8d9f1ff39.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/9b5e961fa686b01823983df8d9f1ff39.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"11659","description":"

5. Super Mario Sunshine 

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There is nothing wrong with a family vacation, but that doesn't mean you have to kidnap someone and force them to go with you (apparently Bowser never got that memo). For the Mario vs. Bowser battle in Super Mario Sunshine, Peach, Bowser, and Bowser Jr. are swimming around in a giant hot tub atop Corona Mountain when Mario comes to save the day. This time, he has to face off against both Bowser's traditional fire breath as well Bowser Jr.'s mini-sub as he works to destroy the five platforms holding the hot tub together. Luckily, he has his trusty water pack, F.L.U.D.D. (Flash Liquidizer Ultra Dousing Device), to help him out. Once victorious, everybody is safe and sound on the island, including Bowser and his son, who will one day meet Mario again.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/d1aad00930d6a0f5c143f0fcabf6bb21.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/d1aad00930d6a0f5c143f0fcabf6bb21.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"11658","description":"

4. Super Mario 64

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The evolution of Mario vs. Bowser battles jumped into 3D in the groundbreaking Super Mario 64 on the Nintendo 64. Meeting up high in the sky, Bowser has plans to defeat Mario once and for all, but in this three-dimensional world, Mario has some new tricks up his sleeve. In this epic boss battle, Mario has to grab Bowser by the tail and swing him around (almost like an Olympic hammer throw) into bombs just off the platform. However, his task is made no easier by having to constantly watch out for Bowser's fire breath. After three successful attempts, Bowser is defeated, and Mario uses the golden star to fly away and meet with his beloved princess.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/a994fa25ca540b374ba9f8c50ddc2d37.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/a994fa25ca540b374ba9f8c50ddc2d37.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"11657","description":"

3. Super Mario World

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On top of Bowser's Castle, amidst a backdrop of thunder and lightning, our plumber hero has to rescue Princess Peach from Bowser once again in Super Mario World. This time, it is a much more complex battle than their previous encounters. With Bowser zipping around in a flying ship, Mario must throw Bowser's own toy-like minions, Mecha-Koopas, back at him, all while avoiding large, black balls and a barrage of fireballs. After Bowser has finally been defeated, Princess Peach drops down to Mario safely, and Bowser disappears to prepare himself for the next showdown with his mustached rival.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/5381bd36ff8fbd3e83bde0360f3c9398.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/5381bd36ff8fbd3e83bde0360f3c9398.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"11656","description":"

2. Super Mario Bros. 3

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In his clash with Bowser in the classic Super Mario Bros. 3, Mario must again avoid fireballs and stomping as he attempts to escape the room in which he's trapped. Fortunately, every time Bowser attempts to crush Mario and misses, he smashes a couple of bricks into tiny pieces. No power-ups are going to defeat Bowser in this encounter; the only way to win this one is to make him crush all the bricks so that his own doing sends him plunging to the depths below. To add to the battle's complexity, Mario has to make sure that he himself doesn't fall! After defeating Bowser, he is finally reunited with Princess Toadstool.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/f33e9ba8f8d16bf433363972e9676860.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/f33e9ba8f8d16bf433363972e9676860.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"11655","description":"

1. Super Mario Bros.

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We can't begin this list without the one that started it all. In the final level of Super Mario Bros., Mario has to reach the other side of a drawbridge without getting hit by fireballs and flying axes (not to mention avoiding getting stomped by Bowser). Luckily, Mario does figure out a way to send Bowser to his doom by activating a switch that retracts the drawbridge and drops Bowser into the lava below. After doing so, he rescues Princess Toadstool, and his adventure ends happily.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/d/e/n/dena-need-nintendo-cover-93895.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/d/e/n/dena-need-nintendo-cover-93895.jpg","type":"slide","id":"174368","description":"

In my opinion, the Mario versus Bowser boss battles have to be some of the greatest hero vs. villain battles ever. Every time they fight, it feels different from their last encounters. No doubt about it, the evolution of their battles over the years has been very influential to the gaming world. It's time to take a look at ten of these historic rivals' greatest boss battles. 

"}]]]>
Amazon Releases Retro Zone With a Chance to Win an SNES Classic https://www.gameskinny.com/9w6a3/amazon-releases-retro-zone-with-a-chance-to-win-an-snes-classic https://www.gameskinny.com/9w6a3/amazon-releases-retro-zone-with-a-chance-to-win-an-snes-classic Wed, 01 Nov 2017 11:41:44 -0400 Sarah Elliman

Today Amazon have announced the launch for their new service Retro Zone and to kick things off the launch they’re offering fans the chance to win an SNES Classic. There are five in the giveaway to mark the start of Amazon’s latest service.

Retro Zone is an "online destination for gamers to find content, discounts and exclusive retro games," with many more services centered around the retro gaming market. You will be able to purchase toys such as the Pokemon Plushies, and retro gaming consoles like the NES Classic and the SEGA Genesis Classic are also available.

Furthermore, Amazon Retro Zone will also feature exclusive discounts and in-game content on various mobile retro games. One example of the deals and content you can expect from Retro Zone is one of their kick-off deals: you can save 29% on RayForce and you will receive an Amazon exclusive stage 2 soundtrack with your purchase.

Retro Zone will also have featured pages for top retro brands like Nintendo and Atari where you can buy vintage physical games and featured consoles. Another featured page will be a specific games section that will highlight exclusive content that you can receive upon making a purchase.

Each month, Amazon will rotate the different discounted games and products that are available  within Retro Zone. Meaning there will be more retro games available every month with this service.

If you would like more information and want to check out the Retro Zone page than you can follow this link. Or look for the Retro Zone tab on the updated Amazon AppStore for Android.

What do you think of Amazon's new service? Do you think that you'll use Retro Zone? Let us know in the comments. 

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Final Fantasy V By Chris Kohler Review -- How Influential A Game Can Be https://www.gameskinny.com/k57o8/final-fantasy-v-by-chris-kohler-review-how-influential-a-game-can-be https://www.gameskinny.com/k57o8/final-fantasy-v-by-chris-kohler-review-how-influential-a-game-can-be Thu, 19 Oct 2017 17:11:05 -0400 Erroll Maas

Final Fantasy is one of the most recognizable franchises in video game history. Ever since the first -- and at the time thought to be the only -- entry in the series, a plethora of Final Fantasy games have mystified players around the world for several decades. Perhaps one of the entries with the most compelling history is Final Fantasy V.

Chris Kohler, Features Editor at Kotaku, has written extensively on the subject -- and in his new book on the game, he closely examines the development and localization of Final Fantasy V, and the legacy it has created.

How FFV Brought New Features to the Table

Final Fantasy V was the first game in the series to have a more cinematic introduction, so the credits felt similar to watching a movie and instilled the player with the sense that they were about to go on an incredible journey. In his book, Kohler goes into even more detail about how the director and writers had to work with the programmers to make sure important scenes came alive in the best way possible so they were more impactful. Through the use of various interviews with the developers, Kohler craftily explores the way the story of the game was conceived.

Kohler also discusses how some of the gameplay of Final Fantasy V was heavily influenced by both Final Fantasy III and Dragon Quest III. Both of these games allowed players to switch character classes whenever they wanted, and Final Fantasy V built upon this element. It took this mechanic a step further by allowing abilities to be carried over when switching characters from one class to another, putting more freedom and more interesting combinations at the player's disposal. The additional information Kohler provides about the best class combinations and most useful skills offers helpful insight for any intrigued player.

Final Fantasy V Becomes a Best Seller in Japan

Although a more brief section in the book, Kohler talks about how Final Fantasy V became a top seller and the best-selling game in the series at the time shortly after its release in Japan. Kohler then continues to talk about the competition between Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy and how one series always seems to have an edge over the other depending on the region. Despite its brevity, this section helps illustrate how different the significance and popularity of a game can be throughout separate parts of the world.

Dedicated Fans Can Make All the Difference

Kohler himself was heavily involved in the story of how Final Fantasy V first reached North American fans. He takes us through how the original Super Nintendo version of Final Fantasy V never had an official release outside of Japan, how he and plenty of other Final Fantasy players modified their systems to play the Japanese version of the game -- despite lacking of basic understanding of the language --- how it led to the creation of an (international) online guide, and even an unofficial fan translation of the game still considered by many to be the best version. The story is an inspiring read for anyone seeking a career in video games,  showing how admirable achievements can be accomplished through enough dedication and effort.

A Monumental Legacy

Through plenty of later Final Fantasy games, to crossover games such as World of Final Fantasy and Dissiddia NT, the impact Final Fantasy V had on the series itself is clear. But the game's impact goes far beyond just the Final Fantasy series.

While previous games helped future JRPG creators get their start, Final Fantasy V was the first game people like Tetsuya Takahashi (the creator of Xenoblade) and Tetsuya Nomura (creator of the Kingdom Hearts video game series and The World Ends With You) really had a hand in creating. The impact of Final Fantasy V goes even further than leading to the creation of later JRPGs, as many of the people who imported and/or helped create the fan translation of Final Fantasy V (including the author) now work with video games in some way.

But the legacy of Final Fantasy V doesn't stop there. An annual charity event has also been created around Final Fantasy V known as the Final Fantasy V Four Job Fiesta, where four jobs are randomly selected for a player who then must complete the game using only those jobs. Kohler goes into detail about the event's creation, the different four job combinations, useful skills, and the benefits and drawbacks of having four characters with the same job, further encouraging curious players to try it out for themselves.

Final Fantasy V may not be as beloved in other countries as it is in Japan, but the development of the game and the overall impact it has had on video games is fascinating. Whether you're a fan of Final Fantasy,  are seeking a career in video games , or just like reading about video game development in general, then this book is highly recommended.

Final Fantasy V by Chris Kohler is available on Amazon and Boss Fight Books.

A digital eBook copy was provided by Boss Fight Books.

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I Love Final Fantasy VI Much More Than Its Creator Does https://www.gameskinny.com/e6itw/i-love-final-fantasy-vi-much-more-than-its-creator-does https://www.gameskinny.com/e6itw/i-love-final-fantasy-vi-much-more-than-its-creator-does Sun, 01 Oct 2017 19:30:42 -0400 Bunansa

Pax West has been prolific with Yoshinori Kitase interviews to promote his mobile game Mobius Final Fantasy. Now in charge of the Final Fantasy brand, he has been at the helm of some of the best games around : he directed FF6, Chrono Trigger as well as FF7. His name is not as well-known as Hironobu Sakaguchi, but his influence is as far-reaching as it gets when it comes to the FF series.

He is, or dare I say was, one of the most talented designers of its time. His deep knowledge in the art of film-making and screenwriting during his student years tremendously helped elevating the franchise into a collection of well-crafted, thought-out stories that are willing to go outside the norm in terms of fantasy worlds. All of this was created at a time under the constraints of 2D. Yet, as his work unquestionably influenced a generation of video game players, the care of Kitase about his own work is more than dubious. And there is nothing more telling than the recent FF6 port.

Top: HD port, Bottom: SNES original | Taken from NeoGAF user Haunted

The new “HD” port is the visual equivalent of an emulator abusing with shiny filters: the colors of the scenes are all thrown out of the window, the sprites are poorly remade with a staggering amount of details that are now lost over the original. The game itself has been stretched out to 16:9, even for their own sprites, meaning that they did not care to make their own original content in the proper aspect ratio. It is a complete mess that has left many players disgruntled, especially since the original (and expensive) SNES game still remains the best version to play today. This fantastic article by Lars Doucet goes over the numerous woes of the HD port in a very thorough and informative way.

One could still think that it was merely the work of an outsourced company and that nobody bothered with a proper quality check for these ports, but the truth is even more surprising. Speaking in a very recent interview, for Kitase the port was not bad, it was in fact…good.

Although Japanese players seem fine with the games’ new art, North American fans have complained that there is no feasible way to play the better SNES or GBA versions of FFV and FFVI on today’s consoles. I asked if Kitase would consider putting the original versions of both games on modern platforms, and he appeared surprised at the request.

“I am actually curious to know — I believe the port version, the one you can get right now, does use the more brushed up artwork that’s a little bit more refined,” Kitase said. “Do fans want to see the older version that’s not as refined? Is that the sentiment?” – Kotaku


There is not even an inkling of understanding of the ports’ failings. The very director of Final Fantasy VI cannot see the problem of this version: a complete disregard of the composition of the scenes he set out to create, of the staging of elements that are harmonious together, of the emotions he wanted to convey with the original sprites. All is fine.

I cannot understate the influence of Kitase in the making of Final Fantasy VI, he was the one responsible of stitching together all the characters that were created by various members of the team in a cohesive manner.

“He [Hironobu Sakaguchi] placed me in charge of event production, carefully assessing those parts I directed. I was essentially given the task of unifying all the scenarios and dramatic sections in the game into a coherent narrative.” – Edge Online


He was the one making choices that are strange at first glance, but beautiful with context.

Here’s one: right after the Phantom Train section, the player is forced to wait for 20 seconds as Cyan is mourning the loss of his family after they exchanged parting words. It then ends up in a fade to black leading us to the overworld. By willfully taking the control away from the player, who is unable to go to his next destination (but can still move!!), it forces the focus on Cyan’s plight. His sprite, head down, is giving all the expressiveness and emotion that several millions of dollars in the latest technology would struggle to give with the same intensity. All of this helped with the moody, cohesive background overwhelmed by the black depths of the Phantom Forest. These 20 seconds of silence elevates the scene far more than words ever could.

All of this exquisitely crafted scene brought forth by a simple, yet powerful scene is thrown out of the window in this “HD” port. It now looks like this :

It just comes at a point where you have to wonder if Kitase even cares about the respect that his work should be given. Any filmmaker would be livid if the treatment of their movie re-issue was a complete mess with the brightness set to 240%. A musician would rip the throat out of any producer if they realized their work was re-mastered with the care of a buffalo charging at a mixing machine. But for Kitase, he doesn’t even begin to see the issue. He doesn’t see it, because 2D lost its value to him.

2D is a legitimate, powerful tool that Kitase had used to craft stories in a way that 3D would be unable to replicate. 2D is the world of imagination, of a unique kind of craftsmanship that sets out to circumvent limitations. The limits are the form. You are only so sure on how to exceed your capabilities when you know where the limits are defined. This is true of Kitase, as he used his background to apply film-making techniques in a two-dimensional space held back by hardware restrictions. For us, it was the greatest playground we could think of at the time. For Kitase, it was merely an abstract language.

Unbeknownst to him, a generation of players forever appreciative of 2D was formed. But the moment commercial 3D came into the field of video games, he was gone before he could see them. And he never looked back.

As myself I was always a fan of video games and when I was creating Final Fantasy V I was in love with what I did and I still love that title and it is one of my cherished titles, but when I showed it to my family they didn’t understand what was happening on screen and that’s when I noticed 2D graphics weren’t providing enough movements or characterizations for people who don’t really play video games or understand video games to understand what was going on. That’s always just stayed in my mind so from now on I wanted to create a video where anyone, whether they play video games or not, can understand in an instant what is going on just by looking at the screen. – Hardcoregamer.com


Ever looking to the future, 2D was not much more than a stepping stone towards the inevitable move to 3D. Another dimension that would speak to a wider audience, that would be able to value itself proudly next to film. The limits are now gone, all there is left is a bit of will and talent to make everything come true. He was right.

3D allowed to discover new forms of movement, new ways of storytelling that cannot be downplayed. Final Fantasy VII, that he also directed, is definitive proof of this. He used 3D as something far more than a gimmick, he used it to create a tour de force. If it lasted for the rest of the franchise is a question that is best left to the opinion of the reader, but his tremendous work was more popular when it reached the realm of 3D than it ever was in his 2D era. Even more so when we consider that the incommensurate love for Final Fantasy VI is a distinctly western affair :

In those days we didn’t have the Internet and, as a more junior staff member, I wasn’t given the opportunity to venture overseas – so I wasn’t really aware of the reception the game received outside of Japan,” says Kitase. “However, in more recent years, I’ve regularly tagged along on PR tours to Europe and America – and I have had a lot more opportunity to talk with foreign media and fans. I must say, whenever I go on these tours I’m taken aback by the number of westerners who ask me to sign their Final Fantasy VI cases. In Japan that would apply more to the subsequent game, Final Fantasy VII, but I get the impression there’s a large number of players in the West who prefer the earlier game. – Edge Online


If you like 2D as much as I do, if you value the games of Yoshinori Kitase much more than he does, it puts you in a strange situation: how do you speak to someone who doesn’t want to speak the same language as you do? Maybe you can’t, but you can force him to.

Kitase now comes from a journey that has been fraught with issues for the franchise, in which he had to bear most of the blame. Final Fantasy XIII and XV (formerly Versus XIII) had been particularly rocky in terms of development, losing their bid in the endless race of graphical achievement. Kitase was unable to hold the stage he set out for himself.

Yet, all of this is nothing compared to what he must have felt afterwards. You can easily pinpoint when Kitase truly reached an all-time low in his career: it was when Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII, an entry of a prestigious brand, sold less than Bravely Default, a newcomer that is preying on the nostalgia of retro Final Fantasy games.

Its liberal use of classic RPG elements was against the battle Kitase waged for the better part of fifteen years to offer games that continues to speak in a language that is more and more easily understood by a general audience. The abstraction he perfected and then left behind was played against him, and the same generation of players who so dearly cherished his past games had spoken in a way they couldn’t before: with their wallet.

My conversation with Kitase took place just a few days after the NPD group had released its sales figures for February 2014. Relevant to our meeting was that fact that while Lightning Returns ranked in the top 10 games for the month, it had been outperformed by Bravely Default, another Square Enix RPG. The discrepancy clearly had caught the company off-guard, if the uncomfortable silence that settled over the table when Kitase mentioned Bravely Default served as any indication.- USGamer


At this very moment, we spoke to him. This hardcore, niche audience that he barely knew existed overtook the casual audience Kitase had focused on for so long.

The overall impression Kitase gave was that of a man taking a long, hard look at a difficult situation and welcoming all feedback, both positive and negative. As the key figurehead for the Final Fantasy series, he knows the games he creates have to change in order to recapture the international successes they enjoyed a decade ago. Right now, he seems to be contemplating what form that change must take. – USGamer


Did something change out of this debacle ? Hardly. He and Motomu Toriyama, who previously both staked a lot on Final Fantasy XIII, are now venturing in the mobile space. They are currently overseeing Mobius Final Fantasy, a game that is, fittingly enough, a full taxing 3D endeavor in a market that is still focusing on 2D games to cater to a wider base of compatible, low-performance smartphones.

But maybe we have to look elsewhere to find change. Mobius is the first game he is producing that is much smaller in scope for a long time. It also introduces something he haven’t seen in a long time: limitations. The mobile space is full of them, and is a never-ending process of learning to overcome them. It might not be what we hoped, but it might be what he needs to find a new perspective in the world of video games. To learn the value of his past games. To love Final Fantasy VI as much as I loved it.

No one knows if it will amount to something, but if this interview in Edge Online, not long after the release of Bravely Default, is of any indication, maybe it will. One day.

It’s maybe strange to say [this], but I miss the limitations of making games in those days,” Kitase acknowledges. “The cartridge capacity was so much smaller, of course, and therefore the challenges were that much greater. But nowadays you can do almost anything in a game. It’s a paradox, but this can be more creatively limiting than having hard technical limitations to work within. There is a certain freedom to be found in working within strict boundaries, one clearly evident in Final Fantasy VI. - Edge Online

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