Gaming Mice  Tagged Articles RSS Feed | GameSkinny.com Gaming Mice  RSS Feed on GameSkinny.com https://www.gameskinny.com/ en Launch Media Network Corsair Dark Core RGB Pro Gaming Mouse Review – Not That Dark After All https://www.gameskinny.com/0cips/corsair-dark-core-rgb-pro-gaming-mouse-review-not-that-dark-after-all https://www.gameskinny.com/0cips/corsair-dark-core-rgb-pro-gaming-mouse-review-not-that-dark-after-all Wed, 08 Apr 2020 01:32:53 -0400 Thomas Wilde

I’ve had a good track record with Corsair products, so I was interested in seeing what the company could do with a new wireless gaming mouse. I generally don’t care to go wireless with mice, particularly not when I’m playing extremely twitchy games like shooters, but after a few levels of Doom Eternal, I realized I’d forgotten the Dark Core was running in wireless mode at all.

I suppose that’s as ringing an endorsement as you could hope for: it’s so responsive that you’ll forget it’s not wired. It feels like a backhanded compliment even to me, but I assure you, I mean it in all sincerity.

Corsair Dark Core RGB Pro Wireless Gaming Mouse Review – Not That Dark After All

The Corsair Dark Core RGB is designed for FPS or MOBA gameplay, with a magnetic interchangeable side grip (see above), on-board profile storage for macros and DPI settings, and nine different programmable buttons. It’s built wide, with a lot of real estate, and no real risk of accidental misclicks, with a high-speed connection that, try as I might, never lagged or missed any inputs.

The Dark Core features three connectivity options, allowing you to hook it up to a system via an included six-foot braided USB-C cable, a Bluetooth connection, or by connecting to its included USB wireless transceiver. Setting it up is trivial and amounts to flipping a small selector switch on the bottom of the mouse that determines how you’re planning to connect it to your system. I was up and running within a couple of minutes of opening the box.

I would throw in a casual warning here that the Dark Core’s USB transceiver is tiny. I’ve lost track of it twice over the course of writing this review. You need to be very careful about putting it away when it’s not in use, inside the small compartment located underneath the removable grip on the right side of the Core.

Like a lot of recent hardware, you do need to install the manufacturer’s custom dashboard to get the most out of the Dark Core. This used to be a buzzkill with earlier Corsair products, as its iCUE software is one of the less intuitive dashboards out there.

However, after a recent update, a lot of the problems I used to have with iCUE have been minimized or removed, like how it used to be pretty bad at tracking battery life in connected devices. It’s still got a handful of issues – it seems to be more focused on looking slick than being useful, which is an ongoing issue with a lot of hardware companies’ dashboard software – but it’s much better than it used to be.

It helps that the Dark Core is still reasonably useful without iCUE, but with it, you can tweak the DPI, change the lighting scheme, and most importantly, engage power-saver mode.

By default, you can comfortably expect 12 hours of battery life out of the mouse, although a lot of its power goes into supporting the typical Corsair rainbow-colored LEDs that line the unit while it’s in operation. Corsair really loves to make its products flash like a candy rave, and the lights on the Dark Core – come to think of it, why is the “Dark Core” this shiny? – are ridiculously bright for a feature that’s surplus to requirements.

In fact, if you turn off the lighting altogether by turning on power-saver mode or just turning the brightness down, the Dark Core’s battery life shoots up dramatically. With it in full disco-ball mode, I was lucky to get a day’s use out of it before it had to charge; with it running dark (core), one full charge lasted for well over a week of intensive use.

If you’re really on the cutting edge, the Dark Core also supports Qi wireless charging, so you can drop it on the same pad you’d use for an enabled smartphone. It’s a handy feature – you can just stick it on the pad at the end of the day the same way you’d drop off your phone – but the internal hardware does make the mouse a little longer and heavier than you might be used to. It’s not a deal-breaker, but it’s definitely built for people who prefer a palm grip.

What really impresses me about the Dark Core, however, is the price. At $79.99, it’s surprisingly inexpensive, particularly considering its battery life, wireless charging, and multiple connection options. A lot of comparable gaming mice, like the Logitech G903, cost considerably more for the same or similar features.

Pros:
  • Weirdly cheap, all things considered.
  • Battery life for days if you turn down the lighting.
  • The option to switch between Bluetooth, wired, and wireless modes makes it portable and adaptable.
  • Easy to set up and customize.
Cons:
  • The USB transmitter is small and easy to lose.
  • iCUE still isn't amazing; lots of options, badly sorted.
  • Not made for small hands.

Most of the issues I have with the Dark Core are really just nitpicks. The USB transceiver is comically small and easy to lose, it’s a little on the large side, and its default lighting pattern feels like a unicorn’s vomiting into my eyes (but there are other options).

You’ll note that none of those actually impact performance, however. Corsair’s made a durable, sensitive wireless mouse with a lot of useful options, and brought it in at a surprisingly affordable price. It’s a useful investment for both the home and office, whether you’re playing games or working.

[Note: A retail unit of the Dark Core RGB Pro was provided by Corsair for the purposes of this review.]

]]>
SteelSeries Rival 3 Review: A Mouse Worth Buying https://www.gameskinny.com/cq49c/steelseries-rival-3-review-a-mouse-worth-buying https://www.gameskinny.com/cq49c/steelseries-rival-3-review-a-mouse-worth-buying Wed, 26 Feb 2020 13:39:36 -0500 Kenneth Seward Jr.

When it comes to PC gaming, I tend to lean on certain peripherals. My headset has to be comfortable, and my keyboard needs to be responsive. The only piece of hardware I don’t spend a lot of time thinking about is my mouse.

That's because it doesn’t take much, in terms of bells and whistles, to make a good mouse, especially nowadays. Aside from the small, general gap in accuracy between optical- and laser-based mice, there isn’t much to worry about when picking up a new mouse. 

That’s not to say there isn’t a "best option" for you.

Considering most gaming mice have a lot of the same features, there are a few notable differences that will make someone pick one mouse over the other. Durability, customization options, cost – all of these factors can steer someone toward or away from a mouse.

For me, the biggest thing is comfort. Spending a ton of time in front of PCs has made me more prone to issues like carpal tunnel syndrome; not being able to rest my right hand comfortably while gaming exacerbates things.

Meaning, mice that are needlessly bulky are out. Smaller, more ergonomically designed mice, like SteelSeries’ Rival 3, are in.

SteelSeries Rival 3 Review: A Mouse Worth Buying

Rivaled Design

Created using lightweight materials, this slim-shaped mouse didn’t put extra strain on my hand or wrist during testing. Its back end fit my palm nicely. There were no raised areas that forced me to bend my wrist.

Instead, I could use a fingertip grip and rest my wrist on my mouse pad during play, something attributable to the position of the side buttons. Overall, the Rival 3 felt great to use.

Even after hours of play over several days, I didn’t experience much discomfort. The Rival 3 wasn’t just comfortable to use, though. It was also durable during my testing.

Featuring high-grade polymer and 60-million-click switches, this mouse is here to stay. At least, that’s the idea. I couldn’t very well test that number clicks in a few weeks, but I did drop the Rival 3 a few times while swapping components. It still looks and feels brand-new.

That's good because the Rival 3 is sleek. There aren’t any parts that jut out or bend in awkward ways. And the 3-zone RGB lighting (located on the back and bottom of the mouse) is attention-grabbing.   

TrueMove

Beyond comfort and durability comes accuracy. The Rival 3 is an optical mouse, which is great for gaming. SteelSeries took things a step further, though, by designing a lightweight sensor specifically for the Rival 3.

Called the TrueMove Core Sensor, Rival 3’s sensor offers true 1-to-1 tracking. This was done by properly balancing the mouse’s CPI (counts per inch), IPS (inches per second), and acceleration. It's an iteration on sensors used by other SteelSeries mice, but that doesn't make its inclusion here any less important.

The Rival 3 starts with a base CPI of 800. This means that a one-inch movement of the mouse moves the cursor 800 pixels. The Rival 3’s base IPS is 300, allowing it to reliably track a speed of 25ft per second. It also has varying acceleration speeds that depend on these settings.

What this all means is that the mouse can be moved quickly to cover a large area without losing its ability to track. There’s no jittering or skipping around because the mouse’s sensor doesn’t get confused by quick movements.

Engine 3

Spinning around to blast a foe or lining up a headshot on a moving target in your favorite shooter is made easier with The Rival 3. Things can get a little tricky out of game, though. This was due to the mouse’s base CPI and acceleration settings. When I set it the Rival 3 to 800 CPI, it took multiple moves of the mouse to get from one side of my screen to the other. It took even more to get to my second monitor.

When I upped the speed – by clicking the CPI button located right below the mouse wheel – things moved too fast. The higher setting of 1600 CPI sent my cursor flying at the slightest touch. This wasn’t the case when playing a fast-paced game. Being contained within a full screen with fewer things to click on helped mitigate the speed, but trying to swap between apps across multiple monitors was a pain.

Thankfully, the SteelSeries Engine 3 software allows for further tweaks. Once downloaded, players can change the mouse's keybinds, save polling rates, customize the 3-zone RGB lighting effects, and more. You can even set up different settings for apps. For instance, it’s possible to display custom effects that are tied to Discord notifications.

Engine 3 can also change the Rival 3’s CPI options. Ranging from 200 to an insane 8500 CPI, there’s a lot of room to experiment. Throw in the ability to change the mouse’s acceleration and deceleration rates, and the only thing keeping you from optimizing the Rival 3 is the software’s slight learning curve. It isn’t as easy to use as say, HyperX’s NGENUITY.

Pros
  • A sleek design
  • Made with durable materials
  • TrueMove Core optical sensor
  • Customizable features
  • Cost
Cons
  • Can be a bit unwieldy right out of the box
  • Engine 3 has a slight learning curve 

The Rival 3 is a solid gaming mouse. It sports a lightweight, ergonomic design, provides true 1-to-1 movement, and is customizable.

I couldn’t ask for much more out a gaming mouse, really, especially at the low cost of $29.99. The Rival 3 has a lot going for it that's typically relegated to higher price points. 

Rival 3 Specs

Sensor  TrueMove Core
Sensor Type Optical
CPI 100-8,500 in
100 CPI increments
IPS 300
Acceleration 35G
Polling Rate 1,000Hz 1ms
Hardware
Acceleration
None


[Note: A Rival 3 review unit was provided by SteelSeries for the purpose of this review.]

]]>
SteelSeries Sets Sights on "Boring Office Peripherals" With New Mouse, Keyboards https://www.gameskinny.com/6r1a5/steelseries-sets-sights-on-boring-office-peripherals-with-new-mouse-keyboards https://www.gameskinny.com/6r1a5/steelseries-sets-sights-on-boring-office-peripherals-with-new-mouse-keyboards Wed, 22 Jan 2020 14:41:01 -0500 GS_Staff

Considering the crushing burden of student debt, not everyone can afford a $150 gaming mouse or a $250 gaming keyboard. Or, appraising the deliciousness of well-prepared restaurant-style Ramen, one might prefer to spend their money elsewhere. Luckily, SteelSeries has released three new gaming peripherals set on providing gamers with quality on the cheap. 

Enter the Rival 3 gaming mouse and the Apex 3 and Apex 5 gaming keyboards. The goal with each peripheral is to replace "boring office peripherals" that many gamers use on a day to day basis. Ehtisham Rabbani, SteelSeries CEO, said of the new peripheral line: 

There are so many gamers out there that are stuck using boring, traditional office peripherals for gaming. With these new products, we set office products in our sights and sought to retool our cutting-edge technologies and put them into products that are accessible for every gamer. No one should have to be stuck using run-of-the-mill office products for gaming.

The Rival 3 retails for $29.99 and employs SteelSeries' TrueMove Core optical sensor. The sensor, made in collaboration with PixArt, is capable of reaching 8,500 CPI. Though that value isn't as meteoric as the Rival 600's 12,000 CPI, it's also $50 cheaper than the Rival 600. The Rival 3 is also 77g and has switches rated for 60 million clicks. 

Retailing for $49.99, the Apex 3 is a full gaming keyboard, complete with num-pad. It features proprietary SteelSeries switches said to surpasses 20 million keypresses. The keyboard is also IP32 water-resistant, similar to the Corsair K68. The Apex 3 also features nifty cable re-routing underneath the chassis, magnetic wrist rest, dedicated media keys, customizable lighting, and "gaming-grade" anti-ghosting. 

At $99.99, the Apex 5 gaming keyboard is the most "expensive" product in the new SteelSeries line. However, it has a few tricks up its sleeves, such as featuring switches that bridge the gap between membrane and mechanical. According to SteelSeries, the Apex 5 also has a magnetic wrist rest, dedicated media controls, and customizable lighting. It also has an OLED Smart Display for viewing information from Discord, TIDAL, and more. 

Of course, we haven't tried any of these products ourselves, so we can't specifically speak to their quality. But SteelSeries has been steadily upping its quality over the past several years, as seen in its other products, such as the Arctis Pro+ gaming headset, Stratus Duo controller, and Sensei Ten ambidextrous gaming mouse. 

All three peripherals are available now globally. You can learn more about them by visiting the SteelSeries website. Be sure to stay tuned for more on these products as we're able to go hands-on with them in the coming weeks. 

]]>
SteelSeries Sensei Ten Gaming Mouse Review: All About Quality of Life https://www.gameskinny.com/v24gx/steelseries-sensei-ten-gaming-mouse-review-all-about-quality-of-life https://www.gameskinny.com/v24gx/steelseries-sensei-ten-gaming-mouse-review-all-about-quality-of-life Tue, 17 Dec 2019 10:31:27 -0500 Thomas Wilde

When you open the box for SteelSeries’ Sensei Ten gaming mouse, you're faced with a bright orange flap with BOW TO THE MASTER written on it in big block capitals. It feels like something out of John Carpenter’s They Live, and sets you up to expect something life-changing.

But no, the Sensei Ten is just a mouse. It’s a perfectly good one, with a clean design, solid responsiveness, and an ergonomic feel, but it’s not anything I’ll be genuflecting towards on the regular.

At an MSRP of $69.99, and with a demand for obedience on the box it came in, I don’t think I’m being unfair if I feel a little let down overall.

The feature set on the Sensei Ten, however, is impressive if not flashy. It’s an ambidextrous, lightweight mouse designed for gaming, but which is small enough to fit easily in a laptop bag, has a durable dual-spring setup, and is tested to work with a wide variety of mouse pads.

Most of what you get out of the Sensei Ten is subtle. I didn’t really appreciate what the mouse was until I spent some time working with a much cheaper mouse, then going back to the Sensei Ten. SteelSeries' mouse is designed to simply work, with a lot of small quality-of-life bonuses built into the model.

What it doesn’t have, really, are any of the big visible features that I usually associate with gaming mice. It has a DPI switch on the top that, by itself, lets you toggle between five pre-set sensitivity settings, and two extra buttons on either side.

In the latter case, the buttons are located so high on the unit that they don’t feel ergonomically useful, in or out of game. You have to retrain your thumb to rest a little higher than usual, which gave me hand cramps in short order. It was often easier to just pretend the extra buttons weren’t there than retrain my hand into a raptor grip. 

On the plus side, the Sensei Ten features a Tilt-Move optical sensor, which is apparently close to the current top of the line. It comes with a tracking system, so your pointer’s position stays consistent even if you pick up the mouse and move it around in the heat of the moment. The sensor features a 450 inches-per-second tracking speed on any particular surface. It's usefully sensitive on anything from a bare table to an expensive custom mousepad or that cheap slab of styrene you got as free swag that one time.

That’s about it, really. The Sensei Ten is a working-man’s mouse, with sturdy construction and customizable sensitivity, with the option to use it ambidextrously if you’re a left-handed player. (It’s downright weird how seldom you see that in a gaming mouse.) The Tilt-Move sensor stabilizes your movements and allows for smooth motions on just about any surface, and the whole package is still small enough to easily fit in your laptop bag.

You can get a perfectly decent user experience from the mouse, or install the SteelSeries Engine to further tweak its responsiveness and sensitivity. By default, it hovers around a CPI (Counts Per Inch) of 1,800, but you can push it all the way up to 18,000 if you should, for whatever reason, need to do so.

Pros:
  • Ambidextrous
  • Tunable CPI
  • Customizable button layout 
  • Configurable to specific games
  • Surprisingly portable
Cons:
  • $69.99 can be a bit steep
  • Relatively small; Big- or medium-handed users need not apply
  • Extra buttons on the sides might as well not be there (see above)

Bottom line: I’m used to gaming-specific mice that have a lot of extra buttons, settings, or various bonuses (i.e. Razer’s assortment of custom grips) that simply aren’t on the Sensei Ten. Most of what I can recommend about the Sensei Ten is invisible, and it is hard to appreciate without a couple of weeks of testing.

It’s perfectly responsive even on old, grimy mousepads; it’s built to last; and it’s quite responsive. If you need a mouse that’ll do just as well for daily tasks as it will for your preferred shooter, and which will probably last for a good few years, the Sensei Ten is here for you.

Sensei Ten Specs

Sensor  TrueMove Pro
Sensor Type Optical
CPI 50-18,000 in
50 CPI increments
IPS 450
Acceleration 50G
Polling Rate 1,000Hz 1ms
Hardware
Acceleration
None


[Note: SteelSeries provided a Sensei Ten review unit and a QcK Edge mousepad for the purposes of this review.]

]]>
Corsair Nightsword RGB Review: Top Notch Comfort and Customization For Wired Mouse Fans https://www.gameskinny.com/5t9fa/corsair-nightsword-rgb-review-top-notch-comfort-and-customization-for-wired-mouse-fans https://www.gameskinny.com/5t9fa/corsair-nightsword-rgb-review-top-notch-comfort-and-customization-for-wired-mouse-fans Thu, 15 Aug 2019 19:14:54 -0400 Ty Arthur

A whole new crop of high performance gaming mice hit shelves this summer, including Corsair's re-designed Nightsword RGB wired model.

As would be expected by the $79.99 price tag, there's a whole lot of mouse to play with here, from a wide range of programmable buttons to extensive lighting options and a customization-focused weight system.

I switched over to the Nightsword RGB after exclusively using the Logitech G305 wireless mouse for the last six months, so I'm approaching this as someone used to snipping that pesky cord and having true free-range mobility.

Even with the cable, I can easily say the Nightsword is an incredibly strong offering from Corsair that's well worth the asking price, with just a few minor design issues present that might not be perfect for all users.

Corsair Nightsword RGB Button Layout

I'm in love with the positioning of #10

To be clear from the get go, this is a righties-only mouse (sorry left handers!), considering the positioning of the thumb rest and sniper button.

You get a total of 10 buttons plus the scroll wheel so this is a mouse that works well for the macro-obssessed MMO crowd as well as the twitchy first-person shooter fans.

It's the positioning of those buttons that's impressive, though, as everything is on the center and left side within easy reach of the thumb or pointer finger.

In particular, I have to mention that the sniper button positioning is spot-on perfect and almost feels a bit like cheating in an online match. Just slightly depress your thumb at its normal resting position, and you quickly drop down to 400 DPI for perfect sniper aiming, then let go to immediately return to your previous DPI setting.

In addition to the sniper button, there are two separate buttons for changing the DPI settings: one for going up and one for going down. This configuration is opposed to the single-button cyclers found in other models. This config is much more useful than the other design style if you need to regularly change settings during a game. 

Moving over from a Logitech mouse with a single DPI button, I found I never accidentally hit the DPI switches while moving my finger, which has happened a few times in the past with the G305 because of its centrally placed single button.

For extra comfort, the Nightsword utilizes the tried and true side thumb rest, and I have to say I wish my wireless gaming mouse had this nifty rubber bit on the side. It makes a big difference during extended gaming sessions, especially for major click fests like action RPGs.

As for the (single) downside regarding the button and grip design: the Nightsword is fairly fat, making it potentially difficult for those with small hands. However, that also means it works well with bigger hands and is aimed more at the palm grip style.

If you don't like the meaty design or prefer using a claw grip, then the Logitech G502 has a similar style with the same sniper button position and side thumb rest, but in an overall sleeker format. Or, you might want to try out the slimmer, and abidextrous, Corsair M55 RGB Pro

Fine Tuning With The iCUE Software 

 Changing RGB lighting and DPI settings is simple with iCUE

When you get into this price range, of course, your mouse is going to come with multi-zone back lighting. Here, the zones are found on the front, sides, and top via the logo.

While they undeniably look cool, those are really just bells and whistles that aren't as important as performance or grip. Your palm will always cover the logo while you play games, so having lighting there is just kinda pointless.

What's more useful are the three light indicators on the left side of the mouse that let you know which DPI setting you currently have active. Of course, those three settings can be customized however you want through Corsair's iCUE software.

The highest DPI option available through the software on this mouse is a whopping 18,000 DPI, which is sort of absurd; you'd never need movement that fast during normal desktop operations, although there are some strategy games and shooter games where you want to go from one extreme periphery to the other with a tiny flick of the wrist.

 I'm not entirely sure Roadrunner can even hit 18,000 DPI!

Besides color and DPI customization, Corsair's software has a surface calibration option that is simply phenomenal.

It automatically adjusts settings after you rotate the mouse in a spiral on your current surface, whether that's a mouse pad, kitchen table, glass desk, or whatever. Movement gets noticeably smoother and more responsive after running the test.

I was playing a lot of the same games with the Nightsword while testing out the Audio-Technica ATH-G1WL wireless headset, and found great performance for FPS games like Black Ops 4, RPGs like Pillars Of Eternity 2, and strategy games like Age Of Wonders: Planetfall.

However, I do have one other complaint regarding the mouse's design, and this one's a bit subjective.

I've gotten used to a certain standard of living by using a wireless mouse with total freedom of movement, and that's tough to compete with when a wired mouse shows up. No matter how I position the cable on the Nightsword RGB, there's still a slight sensation, almost like its pulling to the left a hair more than I want.

That issue is particularly noticeable when I pull my hand off the mouse entirely while playing a game with scrolling map corners. Although, to be fair, if you generally use wired mice, you might not even be able to tell the difference.

On the other side, it is kind of nice to not have yet another device that needs to charge or have batteries changed out regularly, and the heavy duty braided cord will stand up to regular usage and transportation.

Extreme Weight Customization

Lots of mice have back lighting customization and a ton of buttons, so what sets this one apart and really justifies the price?

That's the tunable performance system, offering the maximum amount of comfort by completely customizing not just the overall heaviness of the mouse, but also the positioning of that heaviness by using six different weights.

No matter your hand size or mouse weight preference, you can get the perfect fit here by swapping and re-positioning the internal mass.

That process is super easy, with no screwdriver or parts retriever tool necessary. The bottom pops off, weights snap into place with a little push, bottom snaps back on, and iCUE automatically detects where you put the weight and which kind you used.

After a little trial and error, I found that adding the three hollow 2.8g weights on opposite sides in a triangle pattern got me closest to the weight and glide of my G305, so I feel more at home with my usual mouse style.

The Bottom Line

 The software automatically detects weight placement

Pros:
  • Customizable weight system
  • Excellent surface calibration software
  • 10 buttons that can all be programmed
Cons: 
  • Slightly bulkier model than the typical sleek high end gaming mice
  • Wish it was wireless!

For wired mice fans, this model is a serious winner, especially if you typically use the palm grip and like to play shooters or MOBAs on a regular basis.

With the excellent sniper button position, dual DPI switches, and comfortable weight tuning system, Corsair's Nightsword RGB should be at the top of your list if you're planning on buying a new gaming mouse soon.

Prefer a different mouse style or wondering what other high end offerings to look out for? Check out our roundup of the best wired and wireless gaming mice in 2019 at every price point.

Here are the full Corsair Nightsword RGB specs:

Program Buttons  10
DPI 18,000
Sensor PMW3391
Sensor Type Optical
Backlighting 4 Zone RGB
On Board Memory Yes, 3 Profiles
Button Type Omron
Connectivity Wired
Durability Rating 50 million L/R Click
Grip Type Palm
Weight Tuning Yes, 6 Included Weights
Cable Type 1.8m Braided Fiber

 

[Note: A Nightsword RGB review unit was provided by Corsair for the purpose of this review.]

]]>
Lexip Pu94 Gaming Mouse Review: Unusually Customizable, But Who Actually Needs These Features? https://www.gameskinny.com/joc8d/lexip-pu94-gaming-mouse-review-unusually-customizable-but-who-actually-needs-these-features https://www.gameskinny.com/joc8d/lexip-pu94-gaming-mouse-review-unusually-customizable-but-who-actually-needs-these-features Thu, 01 Aug 2019 11:18:55 -0400 Thomas Wilde

Lexip is a French company, which mounted a successful Kickstarter early last year to deliver a specialized gaming mouse to the world. The trademark feature of the Pu94 is that it integrates two separate internal, miniaturized analog joysticks. One's on the left side of the mouse, under your thumb; the other is controlled by subtly rocking the mouse's shell on its spring-loaded base.

To be honest, when I first heard of it, I wasn't sure why Lexip thought I'd want it. Having a couple of extra makeshift joysticks on a gaming mouse sounded like a level of innovation for innovation's sake, something that you don't often see outside late-night commercials. They might as well have stuck a garlic press on there, or a mandolin slicer, for all the practical application it seemed to have.

The goal, according to Lexip, is to buy yourself a couple of extra seconds in-game by allowing you to move and click simultaneously with the same hand. You can reassign your "WASD" keys to one of the integrated joysticks, for example, so you can pivot, aim, move, and strafe entirely with your mouse.

Lexip's initial product launch last year was bogged down a bit by glitchy software. The company showed up at E3 this year ready to roll with some updates, aiming to make up for lost time, and offered me a chance to test-drive a new edition of the Pu94.

After a couple of weeks of play, it does have a lot going for it.

I'm rough on hardware, and the Pu94 is one of the more sturdy-feeling gaming mice I've ever used. It's got a nice long braided cord, ceramic "feet" along its bottom for a surprisingly smooth glide, two extra buttons on its left side, and one extra "Lexip" button on top underneath the scroll wheel. It's also comfortable in my hand.

I do have to ding the Pu94 straight out of the gate, however, for a lack of documentation. The manual and box appear to be written on the assumption that you're probably buying the mouse straight from Lexip itself, so you've obviously already done your research. Nothing that comes with the mouse tells you about its control panel, which is a free download from Lexip's website, and which is required before you can take advantage of the Pu94's additional options.

Without the control panel, it's just an expensive plug-and-play mouse, with a strange rocking base and a thumbstick that's little better than a second, pointier, oversensitive scroll wheel.

Once you install the control panel, which is still a little glitchy (one of the menus consistently stayed open on my screen even after I closed the panel) but entirely usable, you can start tinkering with the Pu94's DPI, change the colors of its lights, customize the buttons, and adjust the sticks' sensitivity. It comes with a number of pre-set options for games like Kerbal Space Program, DOTA 2, World of Warcraft, and Counter-Strike.

The general idea is meant to be that once you're used to it, you can use the mouse to do some or all of your in-game motion, instead of the mouse plus a keyboard, which means you gain valuable seconds in the heat of the fray.

It does require a lot of custom tinkering unless you're playing one of the games that are already included as presets, however, and once you've got it working, there's a fairly hellacious learning curve. It takes a lot of time to decouple yourself from the old "WASD"/mouse combination, although it's surprisingly useful to be able to save your left hand for things like context commands and quick-selecting weapons.

Mostly, though, this is a gimmick. The Kickstarter and website for the Pu94 are both littered with testimonials from satisfied players who've used the mouse to gain a new competitive edge, but for the amount of work you're putting in here, you have to take your fun fairly seriously. I don't see the real utility here unless you're actually looking to go pro.

There are two big exceptions, though. One is obvious: this would be an ideal solution for any player who happens to not have full use of both hands. The Pu94's actually a surprisingly great accessibility option.

The other is that the dual joysticks make the Pu94 a nice option for playing certain kinds of games that are heavy on spatial navigation. Some players have reported that it's excellent for flight simulators, for example, or building games like The Sims. I actually found it a decent option for playing the non-VR edition of the recent release Bow to Blood, a sort of naval-action game, as it let me move through space a bit more elegantly than a simple "WASD"/mouse combination would allow.

Pros:
  • A comfortable, sleek ergonomic gaming mouse that's built to last
  • Adjustable all the way up to 12,000 DPI
  • Incredibly useful for certain genres, such as flight simulators
  • A great potential accessibility option for disabled or recovering players
Cons:
  • The packaging and manual in the box do not actually mention the control panel software at all; I guess you're supposed to go to the Lexip website out of sheer curiosity and find it that way

  • Definitely a hardcore option for serious players, as only the most driven or dedicated fans will sit down and spend a couple of hours customizing a control scheme like this one

  • A niche product; if you don't intend to use it for its specific hardware options, you'd do better to get a Logitech or Razer product for a bit less money

The Pu94 isn't a bad mouse on its own, and I'd be interested in buying a stripped-down model that simply featured the same degree of comfort and sensitivity. The big key features here, however, take enough work to set up that I question the value of the product as a whole. It's not bad, but outside of a few edge cases or particular genres, it's not particularly necessary.

If you like tinkering with weird hardware, though, this is a must-have. One way or another, there isn't much else like this on the market today.

[Note: A Pu94 review unit was provided by Lexip for the purpose of this review.]

]]>
Corsair M55 RGB Pro Review: Budget in Price Only https://www.gameskinny.com/cu8w7/corsair-m55-rgb-pro-review-budget-in-price-only https://www.gameskinny.com/cu8w7/corsair-m55-rgb-pro-review-budget-in-price-only Wed, 10 Jul 2019 17:09:03 -0400 Jonathan Moore

As most modern mice go, Corsair's M55 RGB Pro gets the job done. In many respects, it's a fairly average and inauspicious mouse when you consider the oversaturated field, and admittedly, the bar for average is pretty high these days. 

When you consider it's a $40 budget model that provides ambidextrous functionality without sacrificing form or function, the mouse broadens its shoulders. 

While there are other competitors in the ambidextrous space, such as GameSir's surprisingly nice GM300 and SteelSeries' egalitarian Sensei 310, there aren't that many to get your hands on, much less clamor about. Consequently, I think the M55 RGB Pro deserves a good deal of attention from righties and lefties alike if for nothing more than its dependability and ease of use. 

I won't say the M55 is the best mouse out there, but I like it a lot for what it is. 

Design

From front to back, the M55 is a minimalist mouse. Remove the RGB lighting and one would have trouble proving this is nothing more than your typical office mouse. 

The hard-plastic shell is covered in a customary matte black finish, while a strip in the middle of the mouse sports a glossy black finish. The contoured sides of the mouse are covered in the expected rubber padding, which has dozens of small triangles grouped together for increased grip. 

There are eight buttons on the mouse: LMB and RMB, mouse wheel, DPI, and two lateral buttons on each side. The LMB and RMB are Omron's rated at 50-million clicks and respond until about halfway down the back of the mouse. 

The two lateral buttons are nicely placed and easy to get to; I appreciate that they jut out from the top of the shell a wee bit, making them recognizable along the shell. While the rupee-shaped DPI switch is rather large, it's placed a bit too far back for palm-grippers and is awkward still in a claw-grip style. 

There are two backlighting regions on the mouse, between the DPI switch and the mouse wheel, and at the lower end of the shell. These are fully customizable, but can't be easily seen while in use, if at all, essentially negating their inclusion.    

Flip the M55 over, and you'll find three feet: two at the front of the mouse on the right and left, and one larger across the back of the mouse. In the center, you'll find the 12,400 DPI PMW3327 optical sensor. 

Lastly, the mouse is crazy light, weighing in at a minuscule 86g. 

Features

Rather unexpectedly, there are quite a few features on the M55 RGB Pro, all of which are accessible through Corsair's iCUE software. 

You can set macros, change pointer speed, and set DPI in one-step increments, something certain players will find a big selling point. You can also easily switch between right-handed and left-handed modes. 

The one thing I did not like is that the software allows you to set the DPI for a sniper button, which is meant to drastically lower your DPI for precise shooting or other precise actions. However, there is no dedicated sniper button; instead, one must be set by the user in the "Actions" section of the software.

Sure, it's a small gripe, but I spent two or three minutes looking for a dedicated button that didn't exist — and nothing in the software tells you where to set it when you finally figure it out. 

As expected, you can also change the M55's RGB lighting, with the entire 16 million color spectrum at your disposal. You can alter the color of the logo and the effects profiles in the lighting effects section. Here you can choose from speed, starting and ending positions (such as with a profile or on click), and three different effects categories: predefined, custom, and lighting link. Within these, you have even more choices such as static, color pulse, rainbow, rain, and temperature. 

Performance

In every game tested, the M55 worked swimmingly and as expected. Killing Floor 2 stood out with the mouse as I was able to consistently increase my headshot record over three separate games.

In Battlefield 1, Blood: Fresh Supply, Skyrim, Stardew Valley, and Cities: Skylines, the mouse was responsive and accurate, and I didn't notice any float on my two cloth mousepads: a Bloody MP-60R and a Logitech Powerplay

My biggest complaint outside of the hard-to-reach DPI switch is the mouse's lift-off distance. A good 3/4 of an inch, the LoD here can make aiming and movement a bit jumpy if you have a proclivity for picking your mouse off the mat when playing. 

Some players won't mind it, but I often found it distracting, and I consciously accounted for it as I played the above games during testing. 

Pros: 
  • Stupid affordable for what you get
  • Responsive and precise
  • Ambidextrous
Cons: 
  • DPI switch is hard to reach
  • Only one on-board memory profile
  • High lift-off distance

There might not be much to write home about when it comes to the M55 RGB Pro, but there's also very little to complain about. This is a super solid mouse and a definite consideration for lefties. 

Corsair has done a lot to round out its catalog of gaming mice. The M55 is another great addition. It's a $40 mouse that feels like a $60 mouse. 

Here are the mouse's full specs: 

Programmable Buttons 8
DPI 12,400 (in single steps)
Sensor PMW3327
Sensor Type Optical
Mouse Backlighting 2 Zone RGB
On-board Memory Profile 1
Button Type Omron (50M)
Mic Frequency Response 100Hz to 10kHz
Connectivity Wired
Cable Length 5.9ft
Grip Type Palm, Claw, Fingertip
Weight Tuning No
Weight 86g
Report Rate 125Hz, 250Hz, 500Hz, 1,000Hz


[Note: An M55 RGB Pro review unit was provided by Corsair for the purpose of this review.]
 

]]>
Logitech G502 Lightspeed Review: Reinvigorating a Classic https://www.gameskinny.com/5kv5h/logitech-g502-lightspeed-review-reinvigorating-a-classic https://www.gameskinny.com/5kv5h/logitech-g502-lightspeed-review-reinvigorating-a-classic Thu, 27 Jun 2019 13:24:33 -0400 Jonathan Moore

There's currently a (growing) trend in the world of gaming peripherals: take an old product people love and update it. Logitech previously did so to great effect with the G935 gaming headset, and now it's done the same with the G502 Wireless Lightspeed gaming mouse.

For those familiar with the G502 line, not much has changed over the years. The upgrades here focus on wireless functionality (both signal transference and charging through Lightspeed), as well as a few changes to the modular weight system and the mouse's sensor. 

Coming in at $149.99, the G502 Lightspeed is pricey, that's true. For some players, other similarly-priced options from Logitech might present more agreeable overall designs. The G903 ($150) and G703 ($100) both implement the G502's Lightspeed and Powerplay technologies; both are also smaller.

It's worth noting that the $149.99 price point is not counting the extra $99 you'll have to spend on the Powerplay mat, which provides the compelling Lightspeed and Powerplay features but does not come with the mouse.

However, there's no reason to sleep on the G502 Wireless. It's one of the best mice you can buy right now. 

Design

The G502 Wireless looks more or less like the two previous models in the Proteus line: the Core and the Spectrum. 

The mouse features an all-black plastic shell and a futuristic design replete with angular angles and curvy curves.

The main body of the mouse, its LMB and RMB, and the thumb rest all feature a matte black finish. Other body accents and buttons feature a glossy black finish. The sides of the mouse are textured black rubber for increased grip. 

Unlike some other mice I've reviewed, the G502's body doesn't seem to scratch or mark easily, which is a good thing. What's more, it's relatively resistant to grease stains from potato-flaked fingers. 

There are 11 total buttons on the G502 Wireless: the LMB and RMB, a clickable mousewheel, and underneath that, a button that changes the wheel's scroll resistance.

Beneath the scroll wheel, there's a button that indicates the mouse's current battery level, and to the right of the LMB, you'll find the DPI up and DPI down buttons. Finally, there are three buttons on the left side of the mouse: two side buttons and a "sniper" button that drastically lowers DPI for more precise movements on the fly.  

On the front of the mouse, between the LMB and RMB, there is a port in case you want to use the mouse in wired mode. Flip the mouse over, and you'll find three rubber feet, the HERO sensor, and the wireless on/off switch.

This is where you'll also find a large detachable plate for inserting four of six removable weights, as well as an area for an insertable core. Logitech provides two of these, which can be easily swapped out. One holds the two larger, 4g weights that come with the mouse, while the other acts as a Powerplay channel.

As for size, the G502 measures in at 132mm long, 75mm wide, and 40 mm deep, making it the same size as the Spectrum. Both, however, are a tad narrower than some other offerings from companies like Corsair.

However, it weighs 7g less than the Spectrum, weighing in at 114g without the six removable weights and 130g with them installed. 

Features

Using the G Hub software, you can change just about everything on the G502 Wireless. 

Starting with lighting, you have all 16 million colors at your disposal, and the mouse features LightSync, which allows you to sync the lighting features and effects of all of your Logitech products. Here, there are individual settings for the primary lighting effects along the side of the mouse, and the logo lighting effects. You can choose from five effects: fixed, cycle, breathing, screen sampler, and audio visualizer. 

As you would expect, you can remap every button on the G502. In the "Assignments" section of G Hub, you can assign everything from commands to keystrokes to macros with the click of a button. The G502 might not have as many buttons as, say, the Scimitar Pro, but it gives players complete control of the mouse with G-Shift, which allows for a plethora of combinations across five saveable profiles.  

Finally, G Hub lets you tweak polling rate and DPI as well. Polling rate has four settings: 125, 250, 500, and 1,000. As for DPI, the G502 is capable of reaching 16,000 DPI, as with most modern mice, it seems. However, the DPI can only be changed in increments of 50.  

Performance

The extremely accurate HERO sensor in the G502 means that it's predictable and relatively consistent. There were times that acceleration and accuracy seemed a tad different between my office mousepad and my pad at home, but the deviations weren't terribly inconsistent. Differences in surface consistency are found in all mice, and HERO does a great job at keeping things stable. 

As with most Logitech mice, sniping heads and precisely targeting fuel tanks on Sniper Elite V2's harder difficulties was a cinch, even with bullet drop. Wasting zombies in Killing Floor 2 was as simple as aim and fire, but being able to pinpoint specific zeds in a horde, and then specific body parts on those zeds, was an added benefit. 

I found the mouse worked equally as effective in games like Age of Empires II HD and Civilization V. Acceleration across the screen was as expected given the specs. The G502 didn't always stop on a dime depending on the surface on which I was playing; however, those moments were few and far between. 

While it's not entirely innovative, I do have to say that I very much enjoy the ease at which you can switch between hyper scrolling and step scrolling on the mouse wheel. Simply pressing the button beneath the scroll wheel switches between the features on the fly. It's something I found myself using more than I thought I would. 

Finally, battery life on the G502 is an estimated 60 hours with the RGB lighting turned off, and an estimated 40 hours with the RGB lighting turned on. I'm not able to completely confirm the efficacy of that reported lifespan.

I predominantly used the G502 with a Powerplay mat provided by Logitech, which continuously charges the mouse while in use. However, in the office and without Powerplay, a full 8-hour work day only used about 10-12% of the battery with the RGB turned on.  

 
Pros: 
  • Comfortable design with well-implemented thumb rest
  • Tunable weight system and wireless dongle holder
  • Accurate and precise in wireless and wired modes
  • Easily switch between hyper scrolling and step scrolling
Cons:
  • Can't use all of the weights if using with Powerplay map
  • RGB is difficult, if not impossible, to see when in use
  • DPI tuning is locked to increments of 50

Anything I can find "wrong" with the G502 is nothing more than a nitpick. Having a Powerplay map for near infinite wireless charging and having seamless wireless signal transference with Lightspeed makes the mouse more compelling than without it.

From stem to stern, the G502 is one of Logitech's finest products. It's a mouse that you should have on your desk if you can afford it. 

Here are the mouse's full specs: 

Height 132mm
Width 75mm
Depth 40mm
Weight
w/o extra weights
114g
Weight
w/ extra weights
130g
Sensor HERO
DPI 100-16,000
Max Acc. >40g
Max Speed >400IPS
Polling Rate(s)
Wired/Wireless
100, 250, 500, 1,000
Battery Life
w/RGB
Up to 48hrs
Battery Life
w/o RGB
Up to 60hrs
Battery Life
w/ Powerplay
~Infinite
On-board Profiles 5

 

[Note: A G502 Wireless review unit was provided by Logitech for the purpose of this review.]

]]>
GameSir GM300 Mouse Review: Surprisingly Good & Customizable https://www.gameskinny.com/z8rzf/gamesir-gm300-mouse-review-surprisingly-good-customizable https://www.gameskinny.com/z8rzf/gamesir-gm300-mouse-review-surprisingly-good-customizable Fri, 07 Jun 2019 12:11:51 -0400 Jonathan Moore

These days, it's hard for any one gaming mouse to stand out from the pack. GameSir's GM300 might not stand head or shoulders above the rest, but it stands firmly in line with the competition. 

From stem to stern, it's a surprisingly good mouse. It doesn't suffer from the same identity crisis that haunts GameSir's GK300 keyboard; instead, the GM300 knows it's a gaming mouse through and through.

Everything you'd expect to find on a modern input device you'll find here. From customizable RGB lighting to tunable DPI and programmable macros to responsive switches, the mouse clicks all the right buttons to be considered a real contender. 

Aside from its low $49.99 price tag, it's also worth noting that the GM300 has both wired and wireless configurations — all in a single unit. More importantly, though, it is an ambidextrous mouse. Anyone looking for such accessibility knows all too well what a rare commodity that is. It's conceivable that fact alone will push this mouse to the top of the pack for some. 

Design

The GM300 comes in all-black. The top shell features a matte finish, while the sides are a bit glossier, although not exactly brushed. The GM300's RGB lighting comes from the GameSir logo positioned at the back of the mouse, as well as from the mousewheel at the front.

The top shell is easily scratchable by even a fingernail, which I noticed while trying to remove a small splash stain. The rest of the mouse, however, isn't prone to scratching. 

Because of its steeper back arch, the GM300 is best suited for palm and claw-grip styles, moving faster, of course, with the latter. However, at a staggering 340 grams with the weights installed, moving fast with the mouse is relative. Removing the weights brings it to a 328 grams. 

In a nice touch, the sides of the mouse can be altered with different side plates, all of which come in the box. Everything pops on and off very easily, and aside from flat side covers, GameSir also provides two thumb rests. The mouse's polygonal weights are on either side of the mouse, positioned underneath near the mouse's feet. These also easily pop out, although neither lighter nor heavier weights are provided. 

There are eight buttons on the mouse: RMB, LMB, the mousewheel, the DPI switch just below it, and two lateral buttons on each side. The RMB and LMB are OMRON switches rated for 20 million clicks, which is in line with some other competing mice. 

If using the mouse in wired mode, there is a port at the front of the mouse for the cable. At the back of the mouse, you'll find a space underneath the top shell for holding the wireless dongle. 

Flip the mouse over to find the on/off switch for wireless mode as well as a switch for releasing the wireless dongle holder. However, it's just as easy to pull the dongle out without using the switch, so I found it mostly useless in my time with the mouse. 

On the bottom, you'll also find the GM300's three feet, as well as its PMW3389 sensor in the middle. 

Features 

Unlike the GK300, which featured no extra software, the GM300 has a rather robust set of features available via G-Core, which allows for myriad customizability options.

Opening up the program, which can be downloaded from the GameSir website, you're met with four different categories.

In Basic Settings, you can change the mouse's native DPI, assigning custom DPIs to any of the GM300's five profiles. Out of the box, the mouse is set to 400,800,1,600, 3,200, and 16,000. GameSir's marketing materials say the mouse can achieve 16,000 DPI at its highest setting, although G-Core's slider "allows" for up to 32,000 DPI, which is patently absurd. 

Despite the efficacy of such a high DPI option, you can also change the GM300's polling rate here (from 125Hz to 1,000Hz), the pointer movement speed from 1-10, and the mouse's overall acceleration, with values ranging from 1-10. 

In Key Settings, you can completely change the function of any of the GM300's eight buttons. From basic a click to volume mute, to DPI cycle and Windows functions, there are more than 40 different options available. This is where users can also change the mouse from a right-hand mouse to a left-mouse at the click of a button. 

Light settings are self-explanatory. If you've used an RGB mouse before, you get all of the same functionality and 16.8 million colors from the GM300 as you do from other such mice. The only difference here is that there are only three different lighting profiles: static, neon, seven-color breathing. You can also set a timer to automatically turn off the mouse's RGB after a certain period of time, which is a nice quality of life touch. 

And finally, there is a bevy of macros available as well. As with other software that provides macro customization, you can name macros, record them, add default (or no) delay, and assign them to specific profiles. Configuring, recording, inserting, and deleting macros is a cinch. 

Functionality 

In-game and at work, the GM300 was smooth and mostly accurate. At higher DPIs, I did notice a bit of inaccuracy, specifically when stopping on specific objects, icons, and buttons. However, in games like Killing Floor 2 and Battlefield 5, the mouse was well accurate enough and didn't prove to be problematic. That was doubly so in wired mode. 

I did experience some rather intolerable jumping when I first used the mouse in wireless mode at work, where I'm using an older computer and three different wireless devices at once. At home, on a newer computer and the same amount of wireless devices, I didn't experience any jumping. This makes me believe my work comp has more electronic noise clouding the GM300 signal, rather than it being an issue with the mouse itself.

Aside from that, all of the buttons are mostly easy to get to, although the side buttons, specifically the ones closer to the front of the mouse, can be difficult to reach when using a claw-grip. The RMB and LMB are responsive from the front of the mouse to the backends of the side buttons, about 3/4 down the back of the mouse. 

The GM300's lift-off distance is about average and useful for someone like me who makes too many micro-movements and micro-lifts while playing. However, there isn't a way to adjust the LoD, as there is with a mouse such as the SteelSeries Rival 700

Pros: 
  • Ambidextrous mouse 
  • Provides wired and wireless capabilities
  • Highly customizable with weights and side panels
  • Responsive, reprogrammable switches
  • Wireless dongle holder
Cons: 
  • Side buttons can be a bit hard to reach
  • Top shell can be easily scratched
  • Heavier than most mice, even with the weights removed
  • Wireless on/off button can be a bit hard to switch

Since we review games and hardware on a full-point scale, I struggled with the final score on the GM300. Ultimately, I decided to go with an 8 because at the end of the day, a lot of my qualms with the mouse were pithy or circumstantial. Overall, the GM300 is a great mouse. 

It might not stand out from the competition in a big way, but that doesn't mean it isn't worth some attention. With multiple customization options, including ambidextrous handling, both wired and wireless functionality, and one of the better PixArt sensors in the PMW3389, giving it a 7 just doesn't feel right. 

Here are the mouse's specs: 

 Connection Type(s)   Wired/Wireless (2.4GHz)
Platforms   PC/macOS
Adjustable 5-Level DPI 400/800/1,600/3,200/16,000
Frame Rate 500fps
Acceleration 50g
Polling Rate 125Hz/250Hz/500Hz/1,000Hz
Switch Lifespan 20 million clicks
Switch Type OMRON
Connectivity USB Type-C
Cable Length 5.91ft
Weight w/ Weights 340 grams
Weight w/o Weights 328 grams


[Note: A GM300 review unit was provided by GameSir for the purpose of this review.]

]]>
Corsair M65 RGB Elite Review: A Worthy Successor to the M65 Pro https://www.gameskinny.com/z36at/corsair-m65-rgb-elite-review-a-worthy-successor-to-the-m65-pro https://www.gameskinny.com/z36at/corsair-m65-rgb-elite-review-a-worthy-successor-to-the-m65-pro Mon, 04 Mar 2019 17:25:12 -0500 Jonathan Moore

When it comes to peripherals, innovation and customizability rule the day. Technology might move at the speed of light, but peripheral manufacturers endeavor to move faster. Look at any product lineup, and it's easy to see that companies live and die by innovation, even on the smallest of scales. 

In that vein, technological modifications needn't be earth-shattering to make an impact on a user base; even small innovations and adjustments can fundamentally impact how we interact with a product. 

So is the case with Corsair's new M65 RGB Elite gaming mouse. Essentially the third step in a series of increasingly effective iterations, the elite moniker accurately describes this ultimate version of the mouse. While it might look almost identical to the M65 Pro, the Elite makes important changes where it counts. 

At $59.99, this wired mouse is nearly impossible to deny.  

Design

The M65 is a slick looking mouse. Sporting what Corsair calls an "industrial design," the mouse looks right at home with the modern PC gaming aesthetic; no matter the setup, the RGB Elite won't look out of place.

The mouse comes in either white or black; I tested the black version, which features a smooth palm rest that gradually transitions into a matte finish on the primary mouse buttons and the sides. 

Underneath the shell, the aluminum chassis peeks out in the front, accentuating the M65's angular design and completing the "industrial" look. This is a change from the M65 Pro, which hid its entire chassis under the shell. 

There are eight Omron buttons on the Elite. Aside from the necessary and expected left-mouse button, right-mouse button, wheel button, and DPI up/down buttons, there are three triggers on the side, including the mouse's forward button, back button, and sniper button, bringing the total number of programmable triggers to eight. 

Underneath those, the shell of the M65 Elite scoops outward, creating a nice, comfortable resting spot for the thumb. On the opposing side, the mouse has a small, shallow channel for the ring and pinky fingers, a space that helps with increased grip. Unlike the smooth top of the mouse, each side has a rougher matte finish to ease slippage. 

Moving to the front of the mouse, an almost 6-foot-long braided cable exits the chassis on the left side. A gap separates the LMB and RMB, creating a pronged look when viewed from the front; in the middle of that gap sits the thick rubber mouse wheel.

Switching around to the back of the mouse, the Corsair logo sits in the middle of the shell and adds a nice flourish whether lit or unlit. Below, another portion of the aluminum chassis just out from underneath the shell.

Finally, flipping the mouse on its back reveals three relatively large removable weights; one is near the back of the mouse while the other two are at the front of the mouse, one on the left and one right. With the weights, the mouse weighs 115g, without them, 97g. 

Features

What really sets the M65 line of mice apart from the many others we've reviewed at GameSkinny is that each mouse is not only fashioned for FPS players, but that each also includes a sniper button.

Essentially the mechanical version of "holding your breath to fire," this button allows players to drastically decrease or increase the M65's DPI while it is depressed; once released, the DPI returns to the initial profile setting. 

Obviously, this functionality is probably of most importance to FPS players, and even more so to those whose method of digital murder is sniping. However, the button also has its uses in strategy games, MOBAs, and third-person shooters.  

But what makes the Elite's version so beneficial is that it fixes problems found in previous versions. Other models in the M65 line placed the sniper button near the middle of the mouse, but underneath the side buttons. The design worked, but it was cramped; with so many buttons in the same area, quickly finding the sniper button could be problematic. 

While the sniper button is still along the left side in the Elite, it's now closer to a user's natural thumb-rest position; closer to the front of the mouse, the button is now just under the "forward" side button, making it extremely easy to find and press. 

The RGB Elite also features a better sensor than previous models. The new PixArt PMW3391 boasts a mind-boggling 18,000 DPI range, which is adjustable at 1 DPI increments. That insane level of customization might overwhelm most average users, but professional FPS and MOBA players will delight in the plethora of customization options at their fingertips. 

On top of that, The M65 has a maximum polling rate of 1000Hz, meaning the PMW3391 is communicating with your CPU 1,000 every second. That makes pulling off headshots and granular movements even more of a cinch, putting the M65 in line with other high-end gaming mice that provide similar functionality. 

While the PMW3391 is certainly a fine, accurate sensor, Corsair claims its inclusion in the RGB Elite is "the first time ever that such an advanced optical sensor is being used in a gaming mouse."

Despite my feelings about the efficacy of the sensor itself, to say this sensor is a monumental departure from those already on the market is a bit misleading. 

Whereas the PMW3391 tracks at "up to 400 inches per second," Logitech's HERO sensor tracks at around the same speed. And 2017's MSI Clutch GM70 was able to reach 18,000 DPI with the PMW3360.

 

 

Lastly, the RGB Elite, of course, has myriad lighting options. Admittedly, I don't have a vast knowledge of the M65 Pro's lighting options; from what I've researched, the RGB Elite just takes what Corsair already does best with lighting and makes it better. From my experience, the Elite's colors are crisp and vibrant, and the dynamic color effects are just as good as ever. 

Of course, Corsair's iCUE software plays a large role here. As expected, users can change everything from lighting zones and colors to lighting patterns and brightness. iCUE is also where users are able to change the mouse's DPI settings, create profiles, set macros, and reassign button functions.  

My only complaint is that iCUE can still be a tad buggy.

Although the software has received a few updates since I last used it, and it now provides robust data about attached peripherals and even computer diagnostics such as CPU temp and RAM usage, it still feels a bit fickle.

Both before and after updating iCUE while using the RGB Elite, I ran into a persistent issue where the mouse began locking up on the highest DPI setting. I could cycle through DPI settings at anything and everything below the maximum setting, but once I reached the maximum setting, I could not return to previous, lower settings. 

Restarting the computer only "fixed" the issue until iCUE restarted, but then the problem persisted. Shutting iCUE down completely "fixed" the problem, but not having access to iCUE also means I don't have access to all of the program's granular lighting options, and I'm locked to the DPI settings programmed to the currently loaded mouse profile. 

While I can start iCUE, tweak my profile, then completely shut iCUE down, it's worth acknowledging that something funky is going on with the software. 

 

Performance

For the most part, the RGB Elite performed very well in-game. I tested the mouse for about a month on Killing Floor 2, Apex Legends, Metro Exodus, Far Cry New Dawn, Subnautica, and They Are Billions.  

In particular, I found that getting headshots in Far Cry New Dawn and Killing Floor 2 was much easier with the RGB Elite than, say, my every-day Rival 600, if only because of the sniper button.

Going from general body shots to quick, precise headshots without having to strafe or deal with float made each game fundamentally more enjoyable. The mouse even (seemingly) made me "decent" at Apex Legends, although I'm historically horrible at competitive shooters. 

I also tested the mouse out for daily use, such as browsing the web, editing, and designing documents in InDesign. As expected, the mouse worked swimmingly, and I found the sniper button to be especially useful when needing to cut out an object in InDesign for example. 

Throughout my time, I did notice a few phantom clicks on the LMB. Though the button is clickable from the mouse wheel to the left side of the mouse, and from the front to the DPI-down button, not every click along the mousewheel registered. I experienced this both in-game and during every-day use. 

Pros:
  • Sniper button is a game-changer, and the redesign makes for easy recall
  • New Pixart sensor increases overall accuracy and precision of movement
  • DPI can be adjusted in one-step intervals for increased customization
Cons: 
  • iCUE seems to be as fickle as ever
  • Experienced ghost clicks on review unit LMB
  • Flatter shape won't be initially comfortable in all hands
  • Weights can be difficult to remove and require screwdriver or coin

Despite the issues with iCUE and the few ghost clicks I experienced, the M65 RGB Elite is a worthy successor to the M65 Pro. For FPS players, the sniper button is invaluable, providing increased precision in high-stress situations. 

While it's not perfect and some of its features, such as 18,000 DPI, are seemingly overkill, the feature set the M65 provides at $59.99 essentially makes its predecessors obsolete. It makes a hell of a good argument when compared to other mice in the same price bracket, too. 

The M65 RGB Elite is available now on Amazon and the Corsair website for $59.99. 

[Note: Corsair provided the M65 RGB Elite unit used in this review]

]]>
Logitech G Reveals New MX518 Gaming Mouse https://www.gameskinny.com/oasrl/logitech-g-reveals-new-mx518-gaming-mouse https://www.gameskinny.com/oasrl/logitech-g-reveals-new-mx518-gaming-mouse Tue, 19 Feb 2019 15:35:12 -0500 QuintLyn

One of Logitech G's more appreciated classic gaming mice is making a return. Today, the company announced it is bringing the MX518 out of retirement, but not without a few updates.

Logitech G's new take on the MX518 features the same classic shape while adding features gamers have come to appreciate since the original was retired. Added to the new MX518 is the company's HERO 16K sensor. From testing various mice that include the sensor, it's Logitech's most accurate gaming sensor, with a capture rate of up to 17,000 frames per second.

Although we've not tested this specific mouse, our experience with HERO has mostly puzzled out high precision levels, specifically on the G603.

The MX518 also includes onboard memory that will allow users to save up to five profiles using Logitech Gaming Software or the G HUB. Since these settings are saved to the mouse itself, players can take the peripheral with them and use any of the saved profiles without needing to download software on other computers.

To give players more control over the MX518, Logitech G has added buttons above and below the scroll wheel that allow for DPI adjustment on the fly. Changes to DPI can also be made using the LGS or the G HUB, or players can just opt for one of five default settings straight out of the box.

This being an update to a classic controller, fans won't have a lot of side buttons to fuss with, but they will have access to eight programmable buttons, which can be used for a variety of commands in game.

As for the rest of the mouse exterior, while it is the same shape as the original MX518, the materials have been updated to give it a more contemporary look.

The Logitech G MX518 Gaming Mouse is available to preorder now via the Logitech G site, as a price of $59.99.

]]>
Corsair Harpoon RGB Wireless Gaming Mouse Review https://www.gameskinny.com/v7n57/corsair-harpoon-rgb-wireless-gaming-mouse-review https://www.gameskinny.com/v7n57/corsair-harpoon-rgb-wireless-gaming-mouse-review Mon, 21 Jan 2019 16:47:24 -0500 ElConquistadork

A new year means a new slew of gaming mice and other assorted hardware vying for your collective attention. As expected, Corsair is right in the mix with the Corsair Harpoon RGB wireless gaming mouse.

Upon initial inspection, the Harpoon is nothing special, but with everything it delivers for $50, it might be one of the best budget gaming mice on the market today.

First thing's first, though: the Harpoon is incredibly adaptable. We're sort of past the argument on the superiority of wired mice over wireless ones when it comes to competitive gaming, but let's not pretend that old habits don't die hard. While the Harpoon offers smooth, lag-free movement when in wireless mode, the ability to go wired is a nice plus.

As I've mentioned before, the Harpoon isn't much to look at. There's a flat black, minimalist design at work with only the barest bit of flash (the RGB logo on the heel of the mouse).

The feel of the design, however, speaks for itself. While it isn't shaped specifically to cater to any particular style of game, there's a universal feel that is comforting. The rubber grips and textured mouse wheel feel terrific, and the buttons are responsive and solid.

The thumb buttons feel responsive as well, and also do a terrific job of being placed at just the right angle to avoid hitting them unnecessarily. The same could be said for the top middle button, which honestly feels the most solid of them all. It's got a nice, hearty clunk feel to it, which I personally enjoy using for heavier weapons or ultimates. 

The Corsair Harpoon Wireless is damn lightweight, coming in at just 99 grams, which makes it a good deal lighter than most gaming mice I run into. This isn't only good for the notion of strain and the often unconscious difference that a gaming mouse can make in movement, but it also helps when it comes to daily wear and tear: the Harpoon Wireless is small, unassuming, and lacks a lot of the extra plastic accouterments that can bang into speakers, keyboards, and any other assorted crap that those of us with smaller desks keep handy.

At up to 60 hours, the battery life on this guy is more than a little impressive. My instinct, like many of you, is to wonder why I'd need a mouse for 60 straight hours. But then flashbacks of power outages, terrible hotels, and late electricity bills comes floating back to me in a huge wave, and I remember that age-old adage: "you never know."

Pros:
  • Wireless at an amazing price
  • Practical design with great button placement
  • Comfortable construction and rubberized plastic
  • The ability to go wireless or wired on a whim
Cons:
  • Spartan design might put off flashier gamers
  • Not a lot of extras

Overall, this is a terrific mouse for general gaming. If you're looking for something with a ton of extras and showy lights, you're not going to find what you're looking for in this one. But if you want a versatile, sharp gaming mouse that works for a variety of games for less than $100, this is a great place to start in 2019.

]]>
7 Xbox One Games That Need Mouse and Keyboard Support — But Don't https://www.gameskinny.com/8xvso/7-xbox-one-games-that-need-mouse-and-keyboard-support-but-dont https://www.gameskinny.com/8xvso/7-xbox-one-games-that-need-mouse-and-keyboard-support-but-dont Wed, 09 Jan 2019 17:30:41 -0500 Ty Arthur

[{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/a/c/backcov-51645.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/a/c/backcov-51645.jpg","type":"slide","id":"193260","description":"

While these are the seven games we'd like to see get mouse and keyboard support on the Xbox One, there are easily dozens more that would work well with more input options.

\n

Of course, personal preference plays a large role here; most players tend to agree that Superhot actually works better with a controller than a mouse, for instance.

\n

What games do you want to see make it to the list? Let us know in the comments section below!

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/a/r/k/ark-survival-evolved-851337-3d03c.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/a/r/k/ark-survival-evolved-851337-3d03c.jpg","type":"slide","id":"193268","description":"

Ark: Survival Evolved

\n

You had to know this one was coming, right? Ark may have been on consoles for quite a while now, but a big portion of the playerbase first jumped in on the early access PC version and is much more used to those controls.

\n

When you have such a sprawling, complicated crafting and breeding system like with Ark, it becomes unwieldy when you cram it all into a handful of buttons.

\n

Keyboard and mouse input opens up Ark's options considerably, although it's worth noting the console version isn't terrible by any means. The devs even somehow managed to make Ark work fairly well with even fewer buttons on the iOS version.

\n

Who knows what's going on with that sorcery. 

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/i/t/cities-bacf7.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/i/t/cities-bacf7.jpg","type":"slide","id":"193267","description":"

Cities: Skylines

\n

It almost feels like we didn't need to list this one because it's such an obvious contender.

\n

Any overhead city management sim is always going to have a smoother experience when mouse and keyboard are involved; easily scrolling with a mouse instead of relying on a control stick is always better.

\n

The ability to quickly click options in the in-game list instead of having to scroll through them with a controller just makes the gameplay much more satisfying. That's not to mention the accuracy a mouse brings to the table; building roads can be tricky in the PC version of the game, but it's a nightmare on console. 

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/a/s/bastion-eef8b.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/a/s/bastion-eef8b.jpg","type":"slide","id":"193264","description":"

Bastion

\n

This may be an older title, but it's still beloved by many and is a hallowed classic that put Supergiant Games on the map.

\n

If you've played both versions of the game, you probably prefer the PC version over its console counterpart. That's because the weapon control scheme just works better with a mouse and keyboard.

\n

Fingers crossed this one gets keyboard support soon so we can replay this groundbreaking title on our living room TVs. 

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/d/i/v/divinity-ed18c.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/d/i/v/divinity-ed18c.jpg","type":"slide","id":"193265","description":"

Divinity: Original Sin II

\n

By and large, RPG fans absolutely adored this take on turn-based fantasy shenanigans; they even had a great time with it on consoles last year.

\n

However, there was one nagging issue that kept me from deeming it a console classic, even if it was on PC. 

\n

Of course, that was the lack of keyboard and mouse support.

\n

It's beyond clear this style of game is meant to be played with a mouse and keyboard, much like a classic cRPG. The experience just changes too radically when you try to force this type gameplay onto a limited-input controller.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/w/a/s/wasteland2-be641.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/w/a/s/wasteland2-be641.jpg","type":"slide","id":"193261","description":"

Wasteland 2 

\n

All of those killer old-school, Renaissance-style cRPGs that have arrived thanks to crowdfunding have been making their way to consoles lately. There's no question that they are far better experiences when you ditch the controller.

\n

For a tactical RPG like Wasteland 2, the ability to roll over and click on-screen elements, or to quickly tap keyboard shortcuts, is a huge part of the game's overall feel and style. There's just something lost when playing with a controller. 

\n

Follow-up Wasteland 3 (set in the snowy post-apocalyptic Colorado landscape) will drop later this year, and if history is any indication, we can expect console versions to follow at some point. And all of those should support mouse and keyboard, especially in 2019.

\n

There's really no excuse for them not to. 

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/l/a/black-ops-1069648-05df3.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/l/a/black-ops-1069648-05df3.jpg","type":"slide","id":"193266","description":"

Call Of Duty: Black Ops 4

\n

This one is a matter of personal preference, but there's a colossal crop of players who prefer playing FPS games with mouse and keyboard, primarily for increased control and accuracy. With the addition of a battle royale mode, mouse support for the Xbox One version of Black Ops 4 has become even more of a necessity.

\n

It's obvious why Fortnite was one of the first games to receive mouse and keyboard support. If you've played both the PC and console version of the battle royale king, you know it's easier to throw up walls or use items quickly by using side mouse buttons or specific key bindings that you've set yourself instead of relying on the game's vanilla bindings.

\n

Blackout may not have the same building aspects as Fortnite, but there are still plenty of other battle royale elements that would make this a much smoother experience with a keyboard and high-end gaming mouse.

\n

That's not even mentioning the boon this would be for traditional multiplayer matches. 

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/h/a/l/halo-wars-featured-dc9e0.png","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/h/a/l/halo-wars-featured-dc9e0.png","type":"slide","id":"193263","description":"

Halo Wars 2

\n

This one is beyond obvious. RTS games were always meant to be played with mice and keyboards in mind; console controllers were ostensibly tacked on later to varying degrees of success (anybody remember Starcraft 64?).

\n

Players have been begging for mouse control for Halo Wars 2 since it first landed, and this seems like a title that must be in the next crop of K+M-compatible announcements.

\n

It's worth noting that players have actually been hacking together unsupported third-party solutions for this problem since the game released, but they usually get banned when playing online, so official mouse and keyboard support would be a godsend to the player base.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/r/o/frontcov-7dabe.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/f/r/o/frontcov-7dabe.jpg","type":"slide","id":"193259","description":"

The crossover event we've all been waiting for has arrived: USB mouse and keyboard support for Xbox One is finally here.

\n

Of course, there are some caveats, unfortunately.

\n

While you can plug any USB mouse and keyboard into the console and hope for the best, the only officially licensed device right now is the Razer Turret -- a wireless keyboard/mouse combo that runs at a whopping $249 and was low-key released during CES 2019.

\n

That's a hefty price tag, but it definitely ticks a lot of the right boxes for those looking for a more PC-centric experience on console. Not only does it have the right green/black aesthetic to go with your Xbox One, it also brings the satisfying chunk chunk chunk sounds of a mechanical keyboard to your living room. Plus, it's got a ton of RGB backlighting options to go along with it.

\n

The Xbox One games that support K+M controls are quite limited at the moment, with these games ready to go right out of the gate:

\n
    \n
  • Fortnite
  • \n
  • Minecraft
  • \n
  • Warframe
  • \n
  • Bomber Crew
  • \n
  • Deep Rock Galactic
  • \n
  • Strange Brigade
  • \n
  • Warhammer: Vermintide 2
  • \n
  • War Thunder
  • \n
  • X-Morph Defense
  • \n
\n

Quite a few more titles are set to receive support in the coming months, and it seems obvious that some games are more suited for this input method than others. In particular, there are a host of games that were ported from PC and were obviously made with the keyboard and mouse control schemes in mind.

\n

Here, we've rounded up our top 7 Xbox One games that need keyboard support, from RPGs to RTSes and beyond.

"}]]]>
Bloody SP80 Bleeding Edge Gaming Mouse Review https://www.gameskinny.com/g3c3t/bloody-sp80-bleeding-edge-gaming-mouse-review https://www.gameskinny.com/g3c3t/bloody-sp80-bleeding-edge-gaming-mouse-review Thu, 06 Dec 2018 10:41:34 -0500 ElConquistadork

With a name that reads like a Brit complaining about his gaming hardware (just read it out loud in an accent if you don't believe me), and a logo that seems to whisper malevolently "we know," the Bloody SP80 Bleeding Edge Gaming Mouse gets lots of bonus points for marketing itself to the youthful gamers out there who are most interested in showing off the flashing lights and hard edges of their computer setup.

Sadly, for the gamer who's looking for more under the hood, Bloody responds with an overwhelming "meh."

I will say right off the bat that the SP80 feels good to play with. The textures on the mouse are varied, which sounds like it would be annoying, but it seems pretty well thought-out. The top of the mouse has a nice soft-touch feel to it, while the left and right wall panels are more textured, allowing for a nice grip. The bottom of the mouse is laid out with four metal feet (as opposed to rubber or plastic ones you'll see on less gaming-focused mice) that make movements feel smooth. The roller functionality is smooth. It's all smooth.

Beyond that, I'm afraid, there's not much to recommend about the Blood SP80. The macro functions and thumb click buttons are perfectly adequate. Bloody themselves promise 1:1 response times, but it felt absolutely no different from most gaming-centric mice I've used in the past. This would be all there was to say about that, if it weren't for my left mouse button suddenly double-clicking automatically. This is particularly amusing considering the fact that Bloody's marketing material for this mouse in particularly proudly proclaims that it has "anti double click" technology. At this rate, the 10 million click performance I've also been promised has been effectively cut in half.

Even with this bug in the hardware, it's not like I have a ton to complain about when it comes to the Blood SP80. But I don't have anything that gets me excited, either. After playing several games with this mouse, its proclamations of tech-marketing words like "Light Strike Optical Switches" feel like just more terminology for the same old stuff. 

I think when you look into Bloody's other mice (there are literally dozens of them, and outside of their shells they seem fairly identical), you start to understand the hook: a sense of quantity over quality. There are so many different Bloody mice to choose from, and they're black and red and have skulls and say "Headshot!" and stuff like that. 

Call me a cynic, but the Bloody SP80 Bleeding Edge Gaming Mouse feels like another example of form over function.

[Note: Bloody provided the SP80 Bleeding Edge used in this review]

Available on Amazon for $59.99.

]]>
14 Best Gaming Mice 2019 Edition: Top Wireless, Wired, And Budget Options https://www.gameskinny.com/o62g2/14-best-gaming-mice-2019-edition-top-wireless-wired-and-budget-options https://www.gameskinny.com/o62g2/14-best-gaming-mice-2019-edition-top-wireless-wired-and-budget-options Wed, 07 Nov 2018 14:42:30 -0500 Ty Arthur

[{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/a/c/backimage-14651.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/a/c/backimage-14651.jpg","type":"slide","id":"190589","description":"

Whether you prefer a slim, light wired mouse or a large wireless option with dozens of programmable buttons, one of these 11 gaming mice options will be the perfect fit for your usage, grip, and hand size.

\n

Which one of these 2018 gaming mice models are you picking for the gamer in your life this holiday season?

\n

Let us know your favorite gaming mouse in the comments below, and be sure to leave a comment if you've seen any killer peripherals we forgot to include!

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/r/o/c/roccat-e2077.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/r/o/c/roccat-e2077.jpg","type":"slide","id":"190577","description":"

ROCCAT Kone Gaming Mouse

\n

Price: $79.99
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

Most high-end gaming mice try to go as compact as possible, but there are other ways to achieve ergonomic, comfortable designs.

\n

ROCCAT does the exact opposite here with the Kone, going for a rounded, larger design for bigger hands.

\n

The weight remains the same, however, with the inward grooved tri-button thumb zone. Like this flared design? You may also be interested in these models.

\n
    \n
  • Razer Basilsk\n
      \n
    • Price: $67.99
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/o/r/corsairdarkcore-eb85d.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/o/r/corsairdarkcore-eb85d.jpg","type":"slide","id":"190575","description":"

Corsair Dark Core Gaming Mouse

\n

Price: $69.99
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

The Dark Core gaming mouse has a similar rounded design to the Kone, but with a textured grip for enhanced comfort.

\n

That's not the only reason for the high price, though. This bad boy includes the Qi charging system. It literally charges wirelessly just by gliding across the mousepad. You can also swap out the side grip manually for ultimate customization.

\n

Wand to know what other models feature wireless charging? Be sure to also check out:

\n
    \n
  • Logitech G903 Lightspeed\n\n
  • \n
  • Razer Mamba Wireless Chroma\n
      \n
    • Price: $99.89
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/6/1/o/61oh69mwdrl-sl1484-847c8.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/6/1/o/61oh69mwdrl-sl1484-847c8.jpg","type":"slide","id":"190576","description":"

SteelSeries Rival 600 Gaming Mouse

\n

Price: $79.99
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

With this SteelSeries gaming mouse, we're starting to get into the high end, more expensive models. But if you are serious about eSports, this is an investment worth making.

\n

The weight balance here is perfect, and the ergonomics are entirely on point if you game for long periods of time. For FPS players in particular, this is a winner. Head over to our review of the Rival 600 to learn more. 

\n

There are a few alternatives if this design doesn't work for you however, such as the:

\n"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/o/r/corsair-4bd2b.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/o/r/corsair-4bd2b.jpg","type":"slide","id":"190574","description":"

Corsair Scimitar Pro Gaming Mouse

\n

Price: $59.99
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

Corsair has -- hands down -- one of the best mice on the market with the side button design.

\n

What sets this one apart is the key slider system, which lets you re-position the buttons on the side to fit your grip.

\n

The side buttons also have textured grips to help you distinguish the feel of each button and ensure precision.

\n

If you love this style of gaming mouse with the buttons on the side, be sure to also check out these models:

\n
    \n
  • Razer Naga Trinity\n
      \n
    • Price: $79.95
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
  • UTechSmart Venus\n
      \n
    • Price: $29.99
      Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
  • Redragon M901\n
      \n
    • Price: $29.99
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/4/1/a/41acfnvu8il-sl1000-782a5.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/4/1/a/41acfnvu8il-sl1000-782a5.jpg","type":"slide","id":"190567","description":"

Logitech G Pro Hero Gaming Mouse

\n

Price: $58.46
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

Not all gamers trust a wireless mouse, as connections can get dropped at inopportune moments. If you are in that boat, the Logitech G Pro Hero version may be a better bet than the wireless G305.

\n

It has the same minimalist aesthetic and comfortable hand design, but gives you an absurdly smooth and responsive experience thanks to the 16k sensor.

\n

Want a top notch responsive mouse but don't care for Logitech? These are some great alternatives:

\n
    \n
  • SteelSeries Sensei 310\n\n
  • \n
  • Razer DeathAdder Elite\n
      \n
    • Price: $44.99
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/g/3/0/g305-f1f9a.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/g/3/0/g305-f1f9a.jpg","type":"slide","id":"190570","description":"

Logitech G305 Gaming Mouse (Wireless)

\n

Price: $49.99
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

This little guy looks unassuming, but let me assure you, it will do everything you need it to, especially if you don't require the flash of RGB focused models.

\n

You get comfort, plenty of button options in a minimalist design, and best of all -- extremely responsive wireless gaming. I could gush about this one a lot, as this is my personal gaming mouse, but instead I'll just point you to my full review here.

\n

Want a different style of wireless? Check out these options instead:

\n
    \n
  • VicTsing Wireless Gaming Mouse\n
      \n
    • Price: $16.99
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
  • Razer Mamba\n
      \n
    • Price: $69.00
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/p/r/o/proteus-6e6a8.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/p/r/o/proteus-6e6a8.jpg","type":"slide","id":"190571","description":"

Logitech G502 Proteus Gaming Mouse

\n

Price: $59.97
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

OK, so the Proteus isn't new to 2018 by any means, but there's a reason it continues to appear on best-of lists year after year.

\n

Simply put, the design here is sublime. You get 11 buttons but without the huge back end of many other mice, and of course, there are removable weights.

\n

The responsiveness of the Proteus is constantly touted, and this is easily one of the best overall gaming mice experiences you can get in a wired model. 

\n

Want something in a different design for different grip styles or hand sizes? Check out these models instead:

\n
    \n
  • Logitech G602\n
      \n
    • Price: $36.17
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
  • Corsair M65 Pro\n
      \n
    • Price: $35.95
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/u/t/e/utech-0cd4b.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/u/t/e/utech-0cd4b.jpg","type":"slide","id":"190573","description":"

UtechSmart Venus MMO Gaming Mouse

\n

Price: $29.99
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

Are you all about extra options? This is the gaming mouse to pick if you don't want to spend $70-$120 to get a ton of additional buttons.

\n

The main selling points here are the removable weights and the 18 (yep, 18!) programmable buttons, with a whole matrix of buttons on the left side.

\n

Why would you need that many? This level of customization is particularly useful for MMORPG players who have tons of skills and attacks that need to be used regularly.

\n

I promise, once you realize you can tap the button with your thumb rather than searching for a number on the keyboard, you won't want to ever go back to the old way of playing again.

\n

The only downside is that the increased size on the back end can get a little uncomfortable during prolonged gaming sessions if you have small hands.

\n

If you like this style with the matrix of extra buttons on the side, be sure to also check out these models (although the Razer and Scimitar are a tad more expensive):

\n
    \n
  • Razer Naga Trinity\n
      \n
    • Price: $79.95
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
  • Corsair Scimitar Pro\n
      \n
    • Price: $59.99
      Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
  • Redragon M901\n
      \n
    • Price: $29.99
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/l/u/d/ludos-61e49.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/l/u/d/ludos-61e49.jpg","type":"slide","id":"197319","description":"

Ludos Flamma Gaming Mouse

\n

Price: $22.90
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

If there's one mouse from 2018 that everybody just seems to love as soon as they get their hands on it, it's this one from lesser-known peripherals company, Ludos. You get a bit of everything with this option, as it goes with the comfortable ergonomic design but still gives you all the color customization options you could want. The kicker is that there are eight customization levels for DPI sensitivity, which is kind of crazy at this price point.

\n

The only real downsides here are that it's a right-hand only model, and the cord is particularly stiff. That takes a while to get used to, especially if you are coming from a wireless mouse with no tether.

\n

Those issues aside, though, if you aren't sure what to choose and just want something high-end but still at a lower price, pick this model.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/l/a/bladehawks-12ac8.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/l/a/bladehawks-12ac8.jpg","type":"slide","id":"197328","description":"

Blade Hawks Wired Gaming Mouse

\n

Price: $19.99
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

The very busy design on this model is pretty ostentatious, but if you like a mouse that makes a statement, this is an input device to consider. With nine programmable buttons and plenty of RGB color options, there's lots to like here for a very affordable price.

\n

Although you can't really tell from the picture above, the grooves on the side of the scroll wheel have a downward, rounded design that can be very comfortable if you prefer to get your whole hand gripped around the top of your mouse.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/6/1/d/61d9c4ycb2l-sl1000-5d09e.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/6/1/d/61d9c4ycb2l-sl1000-5d09e.jpg","type":"slide","id":"190569","description":"

Piktek Wired Gaming Mouse

\n

Price: $18.99
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

Piktek's offering is rather sleek and minimalist compared to the previous two gaming mice, but it boasts full RGB backlighting that can be programmed to flash in seven different modes.

\n

When paired with a backlit keyboard, you get a much stylish gaming experience -- especially when playing at night.

\n

This is also the model where you start to get adjustable DPI settings, which is extremely helpful if you play games that require more precision in certain segments (like zooming in with a sniper scope after running and gunning).

\n

Like the idea of this mouse but want to see what else is available? These are two comparable models worth considering:

\n
    \n
  • Accro Xtrem RGB Gaming Mouse\n
      \n
    • Price: $13.99
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
  • HIRALIY F300 Gaming Mouse\n
      \n
    • Price: $16.99
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/6/1/j/61jr23fzcfl-sl1001-7bddb.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/6/1/j/61jr23fzcfl-sl1001-7bddb.jpg","type":"slide","id":"197327","description":"

Zelotes T90 Professional

\n

Price: $14.99
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

As an alternate to the Redragon, this Zelotes offering keeps up the sleek, angular style but in more of the iconic Logitech look. While I'm not personally a fan of the spider motif, this model isn't lacking options and has many that work well for just about any kind of gamer.

\n

Built-in weights, an extra "fire" key, nice, comfy scroll wheel, and multiple color choices define this mouse. If you can't spend much money but want something with serious gamer aesthetic, this isn't a bad choice at all.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/r/e/d/reddragon-d357d.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/r/e/d/reddragon-d357d.jpg","type":"slide","id":"190572","description":"

Redragon M601 Gaming Mouse

\n

Price: $12.99
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

The Redragon M601 is actually fairly similar in design to the Lenrue, but it's a little less ostentatious, offering the dragon motif instead of the robotic style.

\n

This model comes with removable weights, which is sort of crazy at this price point, letting you change the heft and feel of the mouse to better fit your gaming style.

\n

Between the weights and the programmable buttons, you won't find a better wired mouse at this budget-friendly, cheap price point. There are a few other options available if you don't care for the design though, such as these models:

\n
    \n
  • EasySMX V18\n
      \n
    • Price: $12.99
    • \n
    • But it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
  • Redragon Ergonomic 7 Button\n
      \n
    • Price: $16.99
    • \n
    • But it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
  • Redragon M711 Cobra\n
      \n
    • Price: $19.89
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/7/1/t/71tk6m2h8l-sl1500-102db.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/7/1/t/71tk6m2h8l-sl1500-102db.jpg","type":"slide","id":"190568","description":"

Lenrue Laser Gaming Mouse

\n

Price: $7.99-$9.99
Buy it on: Amazon

\n

Here we start with the lowest low-budget option. But if you couldn't tell from the image above, Lenrue didn't miss out on making something truly eye-catching.

\n

If you just want to dip your toes into what a serious gaming mouse can offer, this is a great place to start, especially if you are a claw grip gamer who likes a little bump in the back for increased palm comfort.

\n

Like the price but don't care for the layout or color scheme? These are some other solid low-cost options that don't skimp on the aesthetics:

\n
    \n
  • Rii Professional 7 Color Gaming Mouse\n
      \n
    • Price: $5.99
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
  • Vosense M Professional\n
      \n
    • Price: $6.99
    • \n
    • Buy it on: Amazon
    • \n
    \n
  • \n
"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/l/a/black-e711e.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/l/a/black-e711e.jpg","type":"slide","id":"197342","description":"

The ability to swap out hardware for better graphics and increased speed isn't the only way that PC gaming's modular nature beats out consoles. Gaming mice typically trump even the best controllers. 

\n

You're missing out on a whole dimension of improved gaming performance if you skimp on the peripherals — that's just a fact.

\n

It may sound like a small, simple thing, but I guarantee that once you've used a serious gaming mouse, you won't ever go back to standard stock mice ever again.

\n

From side buttons that help you build walls faster in Fortnite to the ability to switch DPI on the fly to slow down or speed up aiming, a high-quality gaming mouse really does give you an edge.

\n

There's just one problem — there are hundreds of them on the market, most available at wildly different price ranges and with a huge range of features.

\n

Don't worry, though, we've got your back. Here we've rounded up the 14 best gaming mice in 2019, sorted by price and feature, and we've also included a host of additional options to cover any sort of user, whether you're looking for something high-end or something cheap.

\n

And if you're wondering what to look for when buying a gaming mouse, or why certain gaming mice are better for certain genres, head over to our tips for buying a gaming mouse guide to learn more. 

"}]]]>
SteelSeries Introduces Wireless Gaming Mouse With New Sensor Technology https://www.gameskinny.com/tu652/steelseries-introduces-wireless-gaming-mouse-with-new-sensor-technology https://www.gameskinny.com/tu652/steelseries-introduces-wireless-gaming-mouse-with-new-sensor-technology Tue, 02 Oct 2018 13:00:18 -0400 QuintLyn

Today, SteelSeries announced two new mice are set to enter its Rival series lineup. The first is a completely new offering, the Rival 650 wireless gaming mouse, while the second is a rework of the Rival 700, named the Rival 710.

The Rival 650 features an improved version of SteelSeries sensor technology TrueMove3. The original tech features a 12,000 CPI, 350 IPS optical sensor built exclusively by the company in partnership with PixArt. This tech is expanded upon in the 650 with the TrueMove3+ dual sensor system, which adds a second sensor that exclusively tracks lift-off distance.

Players can adjust this sensor to customize when it stops tracking once the mouse is lifted off a surface. 

This, combined with the mouse's weight system supposedly results in a customizable low-latency, rapid-response tracking that provides the player with esports-level performance.

The Rival 650 is also the first wireless gaming mouse to offer a fast charging feature -- when connected to a USB port that supports it. Depending on how a player has the mouse's lighting profile configured, a five-minute charge can result in three hours of battery life. A 15-minute charge will provide more than 10 hours.

Those looking for a new wireless gaming mouse can grab the Rival 650 on the SteelSeries site for $119.99.

 

As for the Rival 710, the mouse builds on the design of the Rival 700, adding the TrueMove3 sensor and 60-million-click switch durability. It also allows players to set up vibration options.

The mouse is completely modular, even coming with a modular cable system and customizable parts -- like the back and the sensor. 

The Rival 710 is also available on the SteelSeries site and currently costs $99.99 US.

Be sure to check out all of our SteelSeries reviews here, and look out for reviews of these two mice in the next few weeks. 

]]>
HyperX Pulsefire Surge RGB Gaming Mouse Review https://www.gameskinny.com/qg0y7/hyperx-pulsefire-surge-rgb-gaming-mouse-review https://www.gameskinny.com/qg0y7/hyperx-pulsefire-surge-rgb-gaming-mouse-review Wed, 30 May 2018 14:35:07 -0400 ElConquistadork

The difference that a solid gaming mouse can make in both its bells and whistles and ease of play can really make or break your gaming experience. You have to look out for the right weight, feel, and button location when choosing a mouse that will stick with you through hardcore and casual sessions alike.

My experience with the Pulsefire Surge RGB Gaming Mouse showed me that not only has HyperX created a comfortable, user-friendly piece of tech, but they've created one that won't strangle the wallet of gamers on a slimmer budget.

With its smooth, unassuming design, the Pulsefire Surge RGB doesn't immediately jump out as anything particularly special. Outside of its gorgeous RGB lighting (more on that later), the general design feels like many mice I've used in the past, and I expected as much from my experience. However, that assumption changed for me the moment I finally tested it out.

Right off the bat, it felt terrific in hand. The finish has a smooth, rubberized grip that allows for good adhesion without sacrificing your natural dexterity. The button placement is ergonomically designed, and each button had satisfying feedback with each click.

And based on the fact that the Pulsefire Surge RGB is equipped with 50 million click-rated Omron switches, it's my best guess that this mouse is going to feel just as fluid and comfortable this time next year (give or take a few hundred Overwatch sessions). 

I've read some complaints from other users that the Pulsefire Surge's main buttons are designed to fit too close to each other -- that they end up grinding together in the heat of the moment. However, I never experienced this issue. That's because HyperX took the community's feedback to heart and has already released a brand-new version of the mouse that fixes that issue.

The Pulsefire was quickly redesigned to provide more space between the two buttons, which, when compared to the first mouse we were sent, really provides a world of difference when clicking the Pulsefire's LMB and RMB in quick succession. 

HyperX's software remains incredibly user-friendly, with options to program and store different macros provided through straightforward, simple design. You even get the option to change the RGB lighting on the mouse, which, let's face it, was my favorite part. The butter-smooth lighting effects on this little piece of kit really take what is otherwise a plain look and turn it into something truly radiant. HyperX has always done a terrific job with their interface software, and the Pulsefire Surge RGB isn't an exception to that rule.

---

Overall, I would argue that the HyperX Pulsefire Surge RGB is one of the best new gaming mice on the market right now. Its precision, technical kit, and software options are brilliant and fluid like a kiddie-pool filled with grain alcohol.

Add to that the fact that it's sporting a modest $69.99 price tag, can hit 16,000 CPI, and that it works near flawlessly for both work and play, and you've got a solid mouse for both the casual and the hardcore.

The only "downside" is that it doesn't come with customizable weights. Some users may find the Pulsefire a bit light, even though it comes in at 100 grams. But overall, it felt great in hand, and it's not something that should get in the way of picking up this fantastic piece of gear. 

You can buy the Pulsefire Surge RGB from Best Buy for $69.99. 

[Note: HyperX provided the Pulsefire RGB mouse used for this review.]

]]>
Logitech G305 Mouse Review: Affordable, Reliable Wireless Gaming Has Arrived https://www.gameskinny.com/r35mv/logitech-g305-mouse-review-affordable-reliable-wireless-gaming-has-arrived https://www.gameskinny.com/r35mv/logitech-g305-mouse-review-affordable-reliable-wireless-gaming-has-arrived Wed, 30 May 2018 14:01:03 -0400 Ty Arthur

When trying to move up the rankings and compete with the pros -- whether your jam is Fortnite, CS:GO, or anything in-between -- a solid mouse is a must. Rapid response and uninterrupted tracking make a huge difference  -- a larger one than you may at first realize. 

Moving from the stock mouse that came with my PC to the Logitech G305 (one of Logitech's newest gaming-centric mice), I'm shocked by the clear and noticeable differences it provides over most of the mice I've used.

From a comfortable design to instant wireless response, the G305 delivers a light, portable option for the serious gamer.

G305 Design

A quick look at the G305 reveals a surprisingly restrained, simplistic design. No crazy angles and curves like the Proteus, no flared hips like the G300S, and no extended thumb support segment like the G602.

Instead, the G305 offers a smaller, lighter design that works well for either a claw grip or a relaxed hand grip. The mouse has a solid feel but is fairly lightweight for a serious gaming peripheral. I think it feels best with the extra 10g weight added, but if you don't want that weight dragging you down for twitchy FPS action, pulling it out is a snap.

The placement of the rubber feet makes the mouse absolutely smooth: it can glide across your desktop space with ease, and an extra foot at the bottom means overzealous players who slam their mouse buttons down aren't going to do any damage.

Logitech has managed to pack a whole lot into the smaller space of the G305, with the wireless receiver dongle cleverly hidden inside the mouse next to the battery. It's so small and effectively hidden that I didn't even see it the first time I opened the case and thought my mouse mistakenly hadn't included that critical piece.

G305 Features

Having two extra buttons on the side and one just below the scroll wheel significantly improved my Fortnite reflexes (and ranking!) since I didn't have to move my hand and tap F1 to bring up the build menu. The MMB is more pronounced than some of the other mice I've used as well, making it easy to find in frenetic combat situations. 

Another great feature is Logitech's state-of-the-art HERO sensor. Found in some of Logitech's other mice, the HERO sensor is supposed to provide enhanced power efficiency while still pushing exceptional accuracy and performance. And for the most part, it does just that. The sensor is accurate and responsive, shaving time (however small) off my movements. 

You can also automatically switch profiles between games like Fortnite or Overwatch, assigning different functions to the buttons that are game-specific. And these profiles can either be stored on the mouse or on your PC.

With the Logitech software installed, there's a crazy level of detailed usage data to be mined. Turning on the click analyzer lets you see what buttons you press most often, how hard you press them, and how long they remain depressed so you can plan your button profile strategy for any given game.

Best of all, the software lets you manually change sensitivity settings if they aren't to your liking, since some games benefit from flinging the mouse across the screen in an instant, while others need more precision. 

G305 Performance

What you get with the 305 is essentially the same basic functionality as the more expensive G703, but with a few key features culled to lower the price point. Most notably, there's no Powerplay option for automatic recharging on the mouse pad like with the other mice in this series.

Although Powerplay isn't an option here, the G305 will last a good long time on a single AA battery -- up to 250 hours if you keep it on low-power mode. No matter what your settings are or how many profiles you save on the mouse, the battery life is long enough that you really don't need to factor constant battery purchases into the price, so you are saving a good deal by not buying that awesome (but expensive) charging pad.

While the battery life is great, all that really matters for a wireless gaming mouse is its responsiveness -- and that's where the G305 outshines the competition. The sensitivity and response time are actually better here than with my standard wired mouse, which is something that seemed impossible just a few years ago.

Aside from the missing Powerplay feature, another potential issue is the lack of RGB lighting, which has become nearly standard with any gaming mouse currently on the market. While there are cheapo $10 mice out there that have more stylish and ostentatious aesthetics, they won't come close to the sleek, smooth function of the G305. 

Verdict

The G305 is undeniably pricier than your bare bones stock mouse while having a similar aesthetic. Where it beats out the lower-end peripherals, however, is in wireless connectivity, incredible responsiveness, a solid-yet-lightweight feel, and the Logitech gaming software.

For performance over panache, you can't go wrong here. If you don't care about flashing lights or flared, curved designs and just want to dominate in a round of Fortnite, the G305 is enthusiastically recommended.

Rated for 10 million clicks, the Logitech G305 is a fantastic mouse for the price. You can check out the full specs on Logitech's website. 

You can buy the Logitech G305 gaming mouse on Amazon for $59.99.

[Note: Logitech provided the G305 gaming mouse used for this review.]

]]>
SteelSeries Rival 600 Review: Gaming Mice Can't Get Much Better https://www.gameskinny.com/9j5bx/steelseries-rival-600-review-gaming-mice-cant-get-much-better https://www.gameskinny.com/9j5bx/steelseries-rival-600-review-gaming-mice-cant-get-much-better Mon, 29 Jan 2018 14:35:03 -0500 Jonathan Moore

Finding the right gaming mouse is like finding a snug glove in winter -- it’s warm, it’s toasty, and it’s protection from the bitter chill of losing yet another ranked match in Paladins. Finding the right gaming mouse can also be an elusive prospect, one that’s made difficult by the overwhelming glut of mice filling every peripherals storefront on the internet.

In all my time reviewing mice over the past year, I’ve found two that I could definitively say are the right fit for my hybrid grip style -- and can keep up with the way I play video games on the PC. Sure, there've been some great mice to come across my desk, but only a small handful really stand out across the vast expanse of time. Now, I’ve found another.

SteelSeries’ Rival 600 is a phenomenally engineered piece of gaming hardware. It's a mouse that should be on every gamer's desk -- casual or competitive. Because of its TrueMove3+ sensor set (yes, it has two sensors), the 600 sets itself apart from the competition in a unique way. It's the mouse I never knew I wanted until I got my hands on it. 

And now I can't let go. 

Design

If you were to take a cursory glance at the Rival 600, you'd probably walk away thinking it looks a lot like the Rival 310. In fact, the 600 has a (very) similar shape and contour when compared to its TrueMove cousin. But take a closer look and it’s immediately apparent that when it comes to design, the Rival 600 is fiercer and much more aggressive.

Where the left and right mouse buttons of the Rival 310 stop at the prow of the mouse, the split-trigger switches of the Rival 600 reach out over the front of the mouse like prongs on a cyberpunk starship, lending the mouse a futuristic aesthetic that fits well with modern gaming’s RGB, space-age zeal. Move along the top toward the middle of the Rival 600, and you’ll find the obligatory mouse wheel and a relatively large middle mouse button for switching CPI on the fly. I found the 310’s middle button a bit small, so I was glad to see the surface area of the 600’s MMB grow to allow for easier access in tense situations.

From there, move along the left side of the mouse and you'll find three more buttons along the periphery, just above the absurdly comfortable silicone grips. These buttons aren’t as large as those found on the 310; their slimmer designs don't provide large targets for your thumbs. But considering the 600 isn’t as tall in the middle and the back as the 310, the 600 fit in my palm better and helped my thumb easily find each button without any problems.

As is customary with the Rival series of mice, you’ll find the SteelSeries logo branded on the back of the Rival 600. But what isn’t customary is the mouse’s eight-zone RGB lighting. Hop into this clicker’s Engine 3 software and you’ll find that you can not only adjust the lighting beneath the SteelSeries logo, but also the lighting beneath the mouse wheel and in the channels just below the LMB and RMB. The latter conduits add character to the Rival 600 -- offsetting its rather austere all-black color pattern. Using Engine 3, you can cycle through four different effects and millions of colors to program the perfect combination of lush, vibrant lighting. 

But one of the very best things about the Rival 600’s design is that it has detachable side plates that let you customize the weight of the mouse. Coming it at around 96 grams without its detachable cable, the Rival 600 is already one of SteelSeries' heavier mice right out of the box. However, by detaching the sides and inserting one or all of the included eight four-gram weights, you can get the Rival 600 up to 128 grams, making it the perfect choice for those that prefer weight customizability for different gaming situations. It also helps that the weights are on the sides of the mouse -- not the middle -- allowing for more pinpoint customization than that found in some other models.

Performance

Featuring SteelSeries’ TrueMove3 Sensor (here called TrueMove3+), the Rival 600 provides fantastic accuracy and performance. Just like the Rival 310’s TrueMove3, the 600’s TrueMove3+ eschews jitters and jerks for ultra-low latency and what really does feel like true 1-to-1 tracking up to 3,500 CPI. The mouse can reach 12,000 CPI, but SteelSeries can only guarantee 1-to-1 tracking up to 3,500. Regardless, in the same ways I adored the Rival 310 for making Paladins headshots effortless, and in how I praised it for increasing my accuracy while sniping in Battlefield 1, the Rival 600 gave me the accuracy and precision I needed to stay competitive. 

But what really makes the Rival 600 stand apart from every other mouse on the planet is that it sports not one but two sensors. Putting the + in TrueMove3+, the Rival 600’s dedicated lift-off sensor lets you calibrate the mouse’s lift-off distance from 0.5mm to 2mm via SteelSeries Engine 3 software. 

Since I’m one of those players that picks his mouse up as he moves it back and forth, I found the 600’s liftoff sensor to be a savior when playing They Are Billions. By setting the liftoff distance in the middle, I was able to select specific units and structures without having my mouse stop in the middle of my movement -- saving valuable seconds. Playing Killing Floor 2 and setting the lift-off distance as low as possible, I was able to better home in on targets and pull off more crits because my crosshair didn't float off target. 

There’s nothing worse than getting killed because you lifted your mouse just a hair -- and now you’re staring at the ground or at a wall, not the enemy. The Rival 600 all but eliminates that in the eyes of this average Joe. 

SteelSeries wants the Rival 600 to be the go-to mouse for eSports players the world over. Whether they share my sentiments remains to be seen, but I think the 600 has a shot of making that goal a reality. 

Verdict

The Rival 600’s spoiled me. Having the ability to customize my lift-off distance was a functionality I never knew I wanted in a mouse until I had it -- and I don’t know if I can ever go back to a mouse with a single sensor. Coming in at $79.99, the Rival 600 is a high-end mouse at a great price point. Comparing it to SteelSeries’ other offerings, the 600 should be the company's flagship. Hands down.

Rated for 60 million clicks, the 600's buttons are going to last you a long, long time. Using SteelSeries Engine 3 software, you can program profiles to the mouse for both lighting and functionality, easily recalling them even if you don't have the software installed on the computer you're using. And the mouse's USB cable is detachable, making it easier to transport between LANs if that's your thing. 

If you're looking for a mouse with a veritable bevy of buttons, you might find the Rival 600's seven buttons a little on the light side. If so, you'll want to check out SteelSeries' Rival 500, which boasts a whopping 15 buttons and is specifically made for MMO and MOBA players. And if you're looking for something feather-light, you'll want to look elsewhere, too. 

However, the Rival 600 is your go to if you're looking for a generalist mouse that performs well across all genres, lets you customize lift-off distance, and provides killer accuracy and precision. 

You can buy the Rival 600 on Amazon for $79.99

[Note: SteelSeries provided the Rival 600 used for this review.]

]]>
Corsair Looks to Cut the Cord With New Wireless Gaming Peripherals https://www.gameskinny.com/ygz5i/corsair-looks-to-cut-the-cord-with-new-wireless-gaming-peripherals https://www.gameskinny.com/ygz5i/corsair-looks-to-cut-the-cord-with-new-wireless-gaming-peripherals Mon, 08 Jan 2018 17:13:02 -0500 Jonathan Moore

Pushing into the wireless peripherals space for the first time, Corsair announced at CES 2018 a new line of wireless devices they say will provide PC gamers "high performance ... without compromise". 

Dubbed Unplug and Play, Corsair's new wireless technology is the focal point of four new products: the K63 Wireless Mechanical Keyboard, the K63 Wireless Gaming Lapboard, the Dark Core RGB Wireless Gaming Mouse, and the MM1000 Qi Wireless Charging Mouse Pad. As of this writing, the K63 keyboard and lapboard are already available for purchase, while the Dark Core RGB and MM1000 are set to be released sometime later this month. 

A CES 2018 Innovation Award honoree, the K63 mechanical keyboard looks to bring the reliability and durability of the original K63 gaming keyboard to wireless gamers and aficionados everywhere. It sports Cherry MX Red switches, per-key LED backlighting, and programmable keys. Corsair says the K63's battery will last up to 75 hours, and that the keyboard also supports three different connection options: 1ms 2.4GHz wireless, Bluetooth wireless, and wired USB. 

On top of that, if you're a PC gamer that LANs -- or might prefer playing in your living room, for example -- the K63 Lapboard looks to provide an even gaming surface in any setting. The lapboard is billed as lightweight and comfortable, complete with a full-size mouse pad.

The K63 mechanical gaming keyboard currently retails for $109.99 without the lapboard and $159.99 with the board. 

Not to be outdone by other peripherals manufacturers, Corsair also unveiled its first wireless mouse in the Dark Core RGB. Inside its outer shell, the Dark Core houses a 16,000 DPI optical sensor and can connect to your PC via the same three connection options available to the K63 wireless keyboard: 1ms 2.4GHz wireless, Bluetooth wireless, and wired USB. According to press materials, the Dark Core's battery will provide 24 hours of use before needing a recharge and will employ CUE technology for lighting and programming options. 

For those wanting to cut the cord completely, Corsair will also release a 100% wireless option in the Dark Core SE. Although there is no word on if the SE's battery will achieve the same longevity as the Dark Cor RGB, the SE does support Qi wireless technology, which can be found in the new MM1000 hard-surface mousepad.

Corsair says the mat will not only charge the Dark Core SE, but any device that supports Qi charging. Measuring in at 260mmx350mm, the MM1000 also has ports for charging peripherals that don't allow for wireless charging by providing USB Micro-B, Type-C, and Lightning Qi ports. 

As of this writing, there was no information on price or availability for the Dark Core, the Dark Core SE, or the MM1000. 

Stay tuned to GameSkinny for more news and information on Corsair's new line of Unplug and Play gaming peripherals as it develops. 

]]>