Indiana Jones Tagged Articles RSS Feed | GameSkinny.com Indiana Jones RSS Feed on GameSkinny.com https://www.gameskinny.com/ en Launch Media Network How Video Games Almost Bankrupt and Saved Lego https://www.gameskinny.com/67z2h/how-video-games-almost-bankrupt-and-saved-lego https://www.gameskinny.com/67z2h/how-video-games-almost-bankrupt-and-saved-lego Fri, 10 Jan 2014 14:08:35 -0500 Chris Hendricks

Almost everyone has heard of Lego. There are more Lego minifigures in the world than there are people. In fact, there are roughly 65 Lego pieces for every person in the world. Alongside Hasbro and Mattel, Lego is the fastest growing toy company in the world. Heck, Lego is still the world's largest producer of rubber tires (more than 300 million made every year)! Although it is still too early in the year for raw sales numbers for 2013, 2012 saw Lego bring in north of $750 million. Things however have not always been so cheerful for the loveable brick makers from Denmark. As recently as 2004, the entire company almost filed for bankruptcy. 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-1234465/When-Lego-lost-head--toy-story-got-happy-ending.html

How did it go so wrong?

In the late '90s, Lego saw an influx in sales when it reissued their license with Star Wars to accompany the prequel trilogy that would be coming out in the following years. They also signed an agreement to produce Harry Potter sets as well. Initial sales for the sets were booming the summers the movies came out, but declined heavily in the years that no movies were released. Also, Lego had a policy of owning, rather than leasing all of their buildings around the world, and was pushing for a global market of their products. This included clothing and furniture; essentially a way of life. 

They also had a sizeable amount of money tied into their in-house video game production. A lot of money. When they first reported losses in 2002, there were rumblings of a shakeup of Lego's core strategies. Private corporations began smelling the chum in the water and the pressure was on for Lego to prove that it could right the ship. Rumors of Hasbro and Mattel trying to buy out Lego began surfacing and there were questions if Lego would survive. Those concerns grew exponentially when at the end of 2003 Lego reported losses of close to $1 Billion. That's with a "B."

How Lego Survived

Massive restructuring and a hard look inwards saw Lego return to what made them so popular in the first place. Simply putting new product on the shelf every year was no longer going to work. Lego got rid of every non-essential part of their company and focused solely on the innovation and production of quality new products. Millions are now put into marketing and research before a new set is even produced. A big part of the change was Lego selling their video game division, opting to have outside developers create games with the proper licenses. 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-1234465/When-Lego-lost-head--toy-story-got-happy-ending.html

All of these things cut their costs enough to see them slowly begin to rise out from their debt. Oddly enough, however, consistent sales by their now third-party developed video games had a huge impact on the turn-around. The game that had the most immediate impact? 2005's Lego Star Wars: The Video Game. Although the Harry Potter games had been released years earlier, the release of Revenge of the Sith saw fans wanting anything they could get their hands on. Lego saw continued success the following years with more Star WarsIndiana Jones, Batman, Lord of the Rings, and Marvel Super Heroes games. All of these games sold collectively more than 50 million copies and were/are considered quality games within the industry. Also, those games tapped into a previously unused market for Lego, gamers.

With a flock of new people now coming into the stores to buy sets based off of video games they had played, Lego found new life and is still being supported by them today. By looking inward, they were able to see what they needed to change and how they could better utilize their resources. Smartly, they didn't rid themselves from the gaming industry, but rather let people who knew more about it make the important decisions. And we have all benefitted because of that.

And never one to rest on their laurels, Lego has already announced plans for a Lego: The Hobbit game slated to come out later this year. Expect it to do as well as its' LotR counterparts and to have a game for all the films that are released.

What does this mean for the future?

The success Tt Games has had with all of their licensed Lego games is not shocking, but it is still funny that a part of their company that Lego first saw as a liability became a big reason for their reemergence in the toy market as well as being a staple of it moving forward. Gamers are an eclectic and well versed group of people and they are obviously nerds as well as many being collectors. Many of them (us) love to own anything we can that is associated with a game we love. The fact that in this case the extra goodies happen to be little plastic bricks that we can then take to make whatever we want is just an awesome bonus. 

It is not too surprising that the games ended up doing as well as they did, but I think it speaks to the influence we as a community can have on wholly different industries. Not to say that we are the only reason Lego still exists today in its' current form, but you can be assured that gamers played a significant role. As the gaming industry grows and more franchises are realizing the powerful machine that can be video games, it is finally refreshing to see other industries, and to an extent the "common" consumer show us the respect that I think we rightfully deserve. 

So, the next time you walk past a Lego store or see a set in pieces in your closet, have pride in the fact that if you have purchased or played a Lego video game in the past 10 years, you are directly responsible for saving a multi-billion dollar company. And you haven't played any of them yet, what are you waiting for?

http://www.qualitylogoproducts.com/blog/lego-wins-fans-young-and-old/

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How Video Games Almost Bankrupt and Ultimately Saved Lego https://www.gameskinny.com/7aot7/how-video-games-almost-bankrupt-and-ultimately-saved-lego https://www.gameskinny.com/7aot7/how-video-games-almost-bankrupt-and-ultimately-saved-lego Fri, 10 Jan 2014 14:08:34 -0500 Chris Hendricks

Almost everyone has heard of Lego. There are more minifigures in the world than there are people. In fact, there are roughly 65 Lego pieces for every person in the world. Alongside Hasbro and Mattel, Lego is the fastest growing toy company in the world. Heck, Lego is still the world's largest producer of rubber tires (more than 300 million made every year)!

Although it is still too early in the year for raw sales numbers for 2013, 2012 saw Lego bring in north of $750 million. Things however have not always been so cheerful for the loveable brick makers from Denmark. As recently as 2004, the entire company almost filed for bankruptcy. 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-1234465/When-Lego-lost-head--toy-story-got-happy-ending.html

How did it go so wrong?

In the late '90s, Lego saw an influx in sales when it reissued their license with Star Wars to accompany the prequel trilogy that would be coming out in the following years. They also signed an agreement to produce Harry Potter sets as well.  Initial sales for the sets were booming the summers the movies came out, but declined heavily in the years that no movies were released. Also, Lego had a policy of owning, rather than leasing, all of their buildings around the world, and was pushing for a global market of their products. This included clothing and furniture; essentially, a way of life. 

They also had a sizeable amount of money tied into their in-house video game production. A lot of money. When they first reported losses in 2002, there were rumblings of a shakeup of Lego's core strategies. Private corporations began smelling the chum in the water and the pressure was on for Lego to prove that it could right the ship.

Rumors of Hasbro and Mattel trying to buy out Lego began surfacing and there were questions if Lego would survive. Those concerns grew exponentially when, at the end of 2003, Lego reported losses of close to $1 billion, with a "B."

How Lego Survived

Massive restructuring and a hard look inwards saw Lego return to what made them so popular in the first place. Simply putting new product on the shelf every year was no longer going to work.

Lego got rid of every non-essential part of their company and focused solely on the innovation and production of quality new products. Millions are now put into marketing and research before a new set is even produced. A big part of the change was Lego selling their video game division, opting to have outside developers create games with the proper licenses. 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-1234465/When-Lego-lost-head--toy-story-got-happy-ending.html

All of these things cut their costs enough for them slowly begin to rise out from their debt. Oddly enough, however, consistent sales by their now third-party developed video games had a huge impact on the turn-around. The game that had the most immediate impact? 2005's Lego Star Wars: The Video Game.

Although the Harry Potter games had been released years earlier, the release of Revenge of the Sith gave fans a craving for anything they could get their hands on. Lego saw continued success the following years with more Star WarsIndiana Jones, Batman, Lord of the Rings, and Marvel Super Heroes games. All of these games sold collectively more than 50 million copies and were/are considered quality games within the industry. Also, those games tapped into a previously unused market for Lego, gamers.

With a flock of new people now coming into the stores to buy sets based off of video games they had played, Lego found new life and is still being supported by them today. By looking inward, they were able to see what they needed to change and how they could better utilize their resources. Smartly, they didn't completely bail on the gaming industry, but rather let people who knew more about it make the important decisions. And we have all benefitted because of that.

And never one to rest on their laurels, Lego has already announced plans for a Lego: The Hobbit game slated to come out later this year. Expect it to do as well as its' LotR counterparts and to have a game for all the films that are released.

What does this mean for the future?

The success Tt Games has had with all of their licensed Lego games is not shocking, but it is still funny their company, which Lego first saw as a liability, became a big reason for their reemergence in the toy market as well as a staple of it moving forward. Gamers are an eclectic and well versed group of people, and they are obviously nerds as well as collectors. Many of them (us) love to own anything we can that is associated with a game we love. The fact that in this case, the extra goodies happen to be little plastic bricks that we can then take to make whatever we want, is just an awesome bonus. 

It is not too surprising that the games ended up doing as well as they did, but I think it speaks to the influence we as a community can have on wholly different industries. Not to say that we are the only reason Lego still exists today in its current form, but you can be assured that we played a significant role. As the gaming industry grows and more franchises are realizing the powerful machine that is video games, it is refreshing to see other industries, and to an extent the "common" consumer, show us the respect that I think we rightfully deserve. 

So, the next time you walk past a Lego store or see a set in pieces in your closet, have pride in the fact that if you have purchased or played a Lego video game in the past 10 years; you are directly responsible for saving a multi-billion dollar company. And you haven't played any of them yet, what are you waiting for?

http://www.qualitylogoproducts.com/blog/lego-wins-fans-young-and-old/

]]>
Deadfall Adventures Finally Gives Us Some Juicy Details! https://www.gameskinny.com/7jcok/deadfall-adventures-finally-gives-us-some-juicy-details https://www.gameskinny.com/7jcok/deadfall-adventures-finally-gives-us-some-juicy-details Wed, 12 Jun 2013 18:22:02 -0400 ErinV

Deadfall Adventures has been out for quite a while and relatively speaking, there hasn't been much talk about it yet.

This pseudo-Indiana Jones title is your typical action/adventure game from a first-person perspective. Playing as James Lee Quartermain, you use your wits, environment, and special equipment to tackle the most difficult puzzles and to battle your foes. 

Fans of Nordic Games may be expecting something similar to the guns-blazing, monster-riddled Painkiller, but the company has expressed that this isn't the case. Deadfall Adventures will be more about treasure hunting than monster hunting. While it is still a first-person shooter game, there are numerous other objectives and opportunities to be inventive in your gameplay. 

The Farm 51 has put their hearts and souls into this game.

As you go through ruins and jungles, you will notice that the weaponry and equipment you find is pretty accurate to the time period. In the demo shown at E3 today, gamers were able to see the detail of the guns used by James as he battles his way through Mayan ruins. The styling, reload, and more have been researched to ensure that the gaming experience will be as authentic as possible. And this is the same for every weapon in the game.

When questioned about the slow reveal of Deadfall Adventures, the representatives at E3 described the project as a "passion project" that The Farm 51 developed in their spare time. When Nordic Games caught wind of it, they joined into a partnership with the company and helped them to finish development. Due to the game starting out as a "passion project," the developers at The Farm 51 really put the necessary time into this to make it great. It wasn't about the money, it was about the quality.

Inspired by Indiana Jones.

When making the game, developers had Indiana Jones in mind. But rather than rehashing and recreating a tale that has been told over and over, they chose to go back to the foundations for Indiana Jones. They researched H. Rider Haggard's Allan Quartermain to develop a game with the same premise as the classic.

James Lee Quartermain is the great-grandson of Allan Quartermain. All of the storylines are twisted slightly to adjust them to James, but they are drawn directly from the originals. Better yet, they kept the best of Indiana Jones. Just like with Jones, in Deadfall Adventures every treasure comes with a price. You get to battle mummies that are sensitive to your flashlight which realistically needs to charge after you use it. And sometimes you have to find an object that weighs the same as what you just picked up in order to escape a trap.

Deadfall Adventures is scheduled to come out at the end of September...maybe?

The original release date was listed as July 30, 2013, but in the E3 live video stream today, representatives of Nordic Games said that the game would be released at the end of September. However, the game website and trailer still list the release date as July 30th so your guess is as good as mine.

When the game is finally released (date pending), it will be available on PC and Xbox 360. Talks are underway on developing it for other consoles, specifically PS3

Basically, what I gathered from the live talks today is that the game is fantastic, it has multiple objectives and is story driven, and if you are a fan of Indiana Jones then you must check it out!

But enough of what I think, check out the game for yourself and let me know how you feel in the comments below!

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The Secret World Tips its Fedora and Cracks its Whip for Issue #6 https://www.gameskinny.com/sjb59/the-secret-world-tips-its-fedora-and-cracks-its-whip-for-issue-6 https://www.gameskinny.com/sjb59/the-secret-world-tips-its-fedora-and-cracks-its-whip-for-issue-6 Thu, 28 Feb 2013 08:46:46 -0500 Mat Westhorpe

Joel Bylos, Creative Director of The Secret World (and now also MMO stable-mates Age of Conan and Anarchy Online) holds the treasure map to the future fortunes of Funcom's occult world.

He is quick to point out that it is important for the development of a massively multiplayer title to stay light on its feet, identifying the “constantly evolving, dynamic process”, but even so he was able to share the location of a few potential X-marked spots for 2013.

The next content release, scheduled for an early March release, is Issue #6: The Last Train to Cairo. This new content will feature a “multi-layered storyline involving Said, Nassir and Abdel Daoud and leads you through the past and the present to steal a valuable artifact from a roman cult and thwart the atenists plan to turn Cairo into a second Tokyo.”

Judging by some released art previews (see title image), The Last Train to Cairo is not afraid to tip its fedora to a certain whip-toting archaeologist, with what appears to be an action set-piece involving trains and tanks in the desert and “the new and unique Whip Auxilliary weapon.”

But why not - after all, the Indiana Jones series itself was a Lucas/Spielberg love letter to the action matinee cliffhangers of yesteryear. If Funcom developers hadn't “got their Indy on” in Egypt, there would have been an outcry at the missed opportunity.

It's not all about the Nile delta though, with something sinister going on in the South Pacific (please Joel, not a musical). Details are vague but there's mention of “an epic confrontation with an immense foe” and “Jaws of Steel” requiring groups of ten. There's no mention of whether you're likely to need a bigger boat.

In addition to these features, a new veteran and recruitment system will be introduced and a new ranking system in PvP combat.

An exact release date for Issue #6: Last Train to Cairo has not been announced beyond "the beginning of March," but premium members will get access to the content two days early.

What lies beyond Issue #6 is shrouded in mystery, but Bylos has given us some hints - read on.

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