Nimblebit  Tagged Articles RSS Feed | GameSkinny.com Nimblebit  RSS Feed on GameSkinny.com https://www.gameskinny.com/ en Launch Media Network Disney Pulls Star Wars Games From Mobile Stores With No Notice https://www.gameskinny.com/x8pn9/disney-pulls-star-wars-games-from-mobile-stores-with-no-notice https://www.gameskinny.com/x8pn9/disney-pulls-star-wars-games-from-mobile-stores-with-no-notice Sun, 05 Oct 2014 18:50:55 -0400 Ryan Mayle

In a weird change of events, Disney has pulled two games from Apple's and Google's app stores. With no notice to anyone, even developer NimleBit, Disney had both Star Wars Assault Team and Tiny Death Star pulled from all mobile app stores. At first Disney failed to provide anyone with reason as to why these games were taken down, but according to a source on Gamezebo, Disney pulled these applications to focus on future games. One of these games is Star Wars Commander, which reflects the style of Clash of Clans by creating, assaulting, and defending bases as the main goals.

This news is very disconcerting to gamers, as it means that Disney has no issue pulling games without notice, even if you have money invested in them through in-app purchases. This means that we will no longer see future updates to these titles and they will slowly disappear into obscurity. How can the people trust a company enough to give them money for a game, when everyone knows that they can pull support for a game at any moment? We can only hope that Disney doesn’t make this a normal part of business.

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Disco Zoo Guide: Tips, Tricks, and Strategies to Creating the Ultimate Zoo https://www.gameskinny.com/id6hx/disco-zoo-guide-tips-tricks-and-strategies-to-creating-the-ultimate-zoo https://www.gameskinny.com/id6hx/disco-zoo-guide-tips-tricks-and-strategies-to-creating-the-ultimate-zoo Wed, 05 Mar 2014 18:23:46 -0500 Lauren Puga

Disco apparently isn’t dead, because I haven’t been able to stop playing Disco Zoo for the past week. Nimblebit is pretty great at creating games that I invest far too much time in (Tiny Death Star, anyone?) and if you’re like me, you won’t be able to rest until you have every animal in your zoo.  Here are some tips to help you build the biggest and most profitable zoo in Discotown. 

Rescue ALL the animals

Animals earn you coins - the more animals you have, the more coins you’ll earn. This might sound like a no brainer but I was tempted to start an exclusively unicorn zoo before I realized that wasn’t my most profitable option.

In total there are 42 different kinds of animals available in Disco Zoo – six animals per each of the seven rescue regions. You can earn the animals by playing the rescue mini-game, which you access through your launch pad. The mini-game might seem daunting at first, but once you recognize the patterns, capturing animals is pretty easy. Lucky for you, I have all the Disco Zoo animal patterns collected here.  

Level up

After you’ve unlocked some of the higher-level regions, it can be easy to forget about your original crew (sorry pigs).  But don’t sell them short! By leveling up animal habitats, the animals inside will stay awake longer and earn coins faster. To level up, just re-rescue the same animal five times, and repeat until you reach the max level. I recommend starting with animals from the Farm or Outback regions because they’re a little bit easier to find.

Utilize Discobux and disco parties  

They don’t call it Disco Zoo for nothin’!

Not only are discos hilarious to watch, but they can really help make your zoo some money. Sleeping animals will wake up to boogie and remain fully awake after the disco is over. Your zoo will also make double the amount of coins.

Disco parties aren’t free unfortunately – they cost Discobux. The price is 1 Discobux for a minute-long disco, 10 bux for an hour and 50 Discobux for 8 hours. While Discobux can be purchased with real money, you can also win them in the animal rescue game or find them scattered around the park. If you have some left over, the in-game currency can also be used to extend rescues missions and speed up construction on habitats.

Collect coins

While your animals are doing their thing, you could be making some extra coins on the side. Zoo patrons have a bad habit of dropping coins on the ground so scoop them up before they disappear.

Coins come in 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 1K increments so make sure to keep an eye out. Tapping for coins is a great way to pass the time and before you know it, you’ll have enough to purchase that new aircraft you’ve been eyeing.

Read you reviews

If you swipe to the far left of your screen, you can access the zoo office. There, you’ll see all current reviews for your zoo. Don’t get discouraged by bad reviews – they offer helpful suggestions on what changes you could make. Make those changes and you’ll soon be getting good reviews, which can lead to extra coins. Keep an eye out for a pink or grey icon in the top right corner of the screen – this means a new review has come in.

Stay tuned for more Disco Zoo guides to come! 

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Disco Zoo Guide: Animal Types, Patterns and Stats https://www.gameskinny.com/2kxfm/disco-zoo-guide-animal-types-patterns-and-stats https://www.gameskinny.com/2kxfm/disco-zoo-guide-animal-types-patterns-and-stats Tue, 04 Mar 2014 15:55:36 -0500 Lauren Puga

If you're wasting too many coins in Disco Zoo playing the animal rescue mini-game, you may not have realized that each animal has its own distict pattern!

To help speed up your animal collecting and expand your zoo, here's a free ZooPedia on animals patterns and their respective stats.

Farm

Sheep

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 3
Awake time: 4 min

Pig

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 3
Awake time: 5 min

Rabbit

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 3
Awake time: 15 min

Horse

Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 5
Awake time: 1 hr 30 min

Cow

Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 5
Awake time: 1 hr

Unicorn

Rarity: Mythical 
Coins per min: 7
Awake time: 3 hr

 

Outback

Kangaroo

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 4
Awake time: 18 min

Platypus

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 4
Awake time: 9 min

Crocodile

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 4
Awake time: 5 min

Koala

Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 6
Awake time: 1 hr 25 min

Cockatoo

Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 6
Awake time: 1 hr 45 min

Tiddalik

Rarity: Mythical  
Coins per min: 8
Awake time: 3 hr 30 min

 

Savanna

Zebra

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 5
Awake time: 25 min

Hippo

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 5
Awake time: 8 min

Giraffe

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 5
Awake time: 12 min

Lion

Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 7
Awake time: 1 hr 20 min

Elephant

Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 7
Awake time: 1 hr 55 min

Gryphon

Rarity: Mythical 
Coins per min: 9
Awake time: 4 hr

 

Northern

Bear

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 6
Awake time: 9 min

Skunk

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 6
Awake time: 17 min

Beaver

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 6
Awake time: 40 min

Moose

Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 8
Awake time: 1 hr 20 min

Fox

Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 8
Awake time: 1 hr 50 min

Sasquatch

Rarity: Mythical  
Coins per min: 10
Awake time: 4 hr 30 min

 

Polar

Penguin

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 7
Awake time: 33 min

Seal

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 7
Awake time: 11 min

Muskox

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 7
Awake time: 24 min

Polar Bear

Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 9
Awake time: 1 hr 40 min

Walrus

Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 9
Awake time: 1 hr 20 min

Yeti 

Rarity: Mythical 
Coins per min: 11
Awake time: 5 hr

 

Jungle

Monkey

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 8
Awake time: 14 min

Toucan 

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 8
Awake time: 8 min

Gorilla

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 8
Awake time: 22 min

Panda

Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 10
Awake time: 1 hr 15 min

Tiger

Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 10
Awake time: 1 hr 45 min

Phoenix

Rarity: Mythical 
Coins per min: 12
Awake time: 1 hr 45 min

 

Jurassic

Diplodocus

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 9
Awake time: 10 min

Stegosaurus

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 9
Awake time: 16 min

Raptor

Rarity: Common
Coins per min: 9
Awake time: 27 min

T-Rex
 
Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 11
Awake time: 1 hr 50 min

Triceratops

Rarity: Rare
Coins per min: 11
Awake time: 1 hr 10 min

Dragon

Rarity: Mythical 
Coins per min: 11
Awake time: 4 hr 15 min


Find the ZooPedia helpful? Check out other tips and tricks in my DiscoZoo guide right here.

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Star Wars: Tiny Death Star - Microtransactions Are Quicker, Easier, More Seductive https://www.gameskinny.com/mfrq4/star-wars-tiny-death-star-microtransactions-are-quicker-easier-more-seductive https://www.gameskinny.com/mfrq4/star-wars-tiny-death-star-microtransactions-are-quicker-easier-more-seductive Mon, 11 Nov 2013 11:35:07 -0500 Mat Westhorpe

When NimbleBit's Tiny Tower came out in 2011, I was attracted to its concept of playing building supervisor to an ever growing high-rise population of bitizens. Its retro graphics and quirky charm reminded me of Little Computer People from the 80s.

Tiny Tower was unsurprisingly a commercial success and is following in the footsteps of the Lego games series, Angry Birds et al and is back with a new Star Wars skin. I'd be disgruntled by this, but I suppose if we can have Yoda selling us cellphone tariffs, then the credibility of the Star Wars brand has already become a bit of a joke.

In the era of F2P, Star Wars: Tiny Death Star was inevitable.

A Fully Operational Cash Cow

Fandom grumbles aside, Nimblebit have done a competent job of adapting the Star Wars universe to their pixelated brand, taking the role of a nameless Imperial skivvy whose job it is to construct the Death Star under the watchful attentions of the Emperor and Darth Vader.

The game design is more or less identical to its vanilla predecessor, with the player starting off with a few Death Star decks stacked atop one another in a vertically scrolling format. The first floor lobby is simply decoration, now featuring a Death Star hologram and what I think is a children's TIE-fighter ride.

The other two starting floors comprise a cafe and a residential floor. These are key to the management of your growing technological terror as you house and employ the influx of Imperial bitizens.

Each bitizen has an ability level from one to nine in each of four trades; food, service, recreation and retail. Each deck (aside from the residential ones) has three employment positions to which bitizens can be assigned. For each employee, the deck can produce goods which will automatically generate Credits. These Credits can be used to construct more decks, which will attract more bitizens and so your Empire grows.

With that simplicity, Tiny Death Star soon worms its way into your heart as a background obsession. The free-to-play microtransaction mechanic takes a while to emerge, with the need to wait for progress bars initially hidden by the multitude of things to do and the initial availability of free Imperial Bux which enable the bypassing of the waiting mechanic.

There are many nice touches and in-jokes that add to the Tiny Death Star's charm and NimbleBit has clearly polished their formula since the Tiny Tower prototype. The addition of unlockable cutscenes is a new addition and the first one certainly made me smile.

This Deal is Getting Worse All the Time

As with Tiny Tower and countless other games designed around encouraging unlimited spending, it soon becomes a matter of choice to take the slow path and wait for things to build naturally or pay for quick access to new decks and other content.

I have yet to explore Tiny Death Star to excess, but providing NimbleBit has stuck to the Tiny Tower formula, I don't expect a paywall preventing access to content. What will be needed in order to see everything the game has to offer is either Jedi-like patience or disposable cash in vast quantities. 

Overall, Star Wars: Tiny Death Star will probably stay on my iPhone for a while, but even this will not convert me to the dark side of microtransaction gameplay.

 Edit: After playing for longer, the attention to detail alone has caused me to bump the score from 6 to 7.

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5 Reasons Why Pocket Trains is Better Than Pocket Planes https://www.gameskinny.com/o21ha/5-reasons-why-pocket-trains-is-better-than-pocket-planes https://www.gameskinny.com/o21ha/5-reasons-why-pocket-trains-is-better-than-pocket-planes Mon, 07 Oct 2013 19:12:22 -0400 ben.sipe

Let me start by saying I love NimbleBit games and the studio as a whole. I, like many of you, was hooked when I discovered Tiny Tower. I love the pixel art, the bitizen characters and the little attentions to detail in their games like the Bitbook (mock in-game Facebook). Not only are their games good but it seems like they are the underdogs that everyone is rooting for, and I mean "underdog" in the best way possible - they don't have the capital or resources that their competition has. It's hard not to respect them when they send notes like this to studios who copy their games.

Then there was Pocket Planes. I enjoyed Pocket Planes, but not for very long. I played for less than a month and didn't monetize. I felt the game fell short in a few different aspects. Some complain the gameplay is a little repetitive but that can be said for most games. What's not repetitive about Candy Crush or Clash of Clans? However, the lack of missions and progression got to me. I also ended up discovering a killer strategy. Invest in the larger planes (level 3) and close all airports except your major (level 3) airports. The strategy wasn't dependent on how many airports/routes you had, but relied on sending better planes on longer routes. This seemed more like an exploit rather than a compelling strategy.

When Pocket Trains came out several people around me were initially underwhelmed saying things like "this is just another Pocket Planes." I had to remind them that many games are clones of another, or get inspiration from another game. This isn't a bad thing so long as they improve on the former or inspirational game. After playing Pocket Trains for a while now I think there are 5 critical things that NimbleBit improved to make the game more compelling and I'm sure some of these could be applied to other games out there.

1. Improved Strategy

NimbleBit improved on this in several ways so we'll tackle them one at a time.

  • Pocket Trains encourages expansion. Like I mentioned above, there's a point in Pocket Planes where it doesn't make sense to continue to operate smaller planes and airports so your network shrinks. However, in Pocket Trains you need to keep those previous routes open in order to keep expanding. This helps with the player's sense of progression since their empire is never shrinking.
  • Planning routes is more simplistic. In Pocket Planes it costs money to fly somewhere. This might be more accurate in the real world, but it makes the planning process longer. In the end, I only care about the profit margin from each thing I'm transporting. I do enjoy more expansive/complex strategy games, but this game is on mobile so if you can make it easier to play then it's usually best to do so. 
  • It's all about routes, not who has the best train type. In Pocket Trains each train type has a different set of stats. Some are very fast but don't hold much fuel, and others might have a larger towing capacity but are very slow. There are routes that work better for certain train types and it's up to the player to figure that out. On the surface, players won't recognize this but it's these layers of complexity over a simple set of actions that makes Pocket Trains a much better game. 

Building a network and using the right trains for proper routes is crucial.

2. Can't Buy Specific Trains

In Pocket Planes players can purchase plane parts in order to "build" new planes at a discount, but there's also the option to just buy the plane already built. Having the option to buy the planes instantly devalued them to me. There's no scarcity or nothing special about those planes if you don't need to work for them.

You can buy planes parts...

...or skip it and just purchase planes.

I believe NimbleBit realized this and that's why you can't purchase pre-built trains in Pocket Trains. Players need to collect crates and use "bux" (premium currency) to open them. This makes even paying players work for special train types and it also helps drain player's premium currency, but NimbleBit is also generous with the premium currency so they're not being greedy about it.

I need more special crates to finish these trains! Perhaps I should buy some. :)

3. More Currency Types

Like in previous NimbleBit games there are coins and bux for the standard and premium currencies. However, NimbleBit also added "crates" and "special crate" IAP options. Players come by regular crates pretty often, but special crates are rare and require a large amount of coins to purchase. This is a great accompanying IAP option to bux because bux are required in order to open crates. If I spend $5 on 50 special crates then I'll likely also need some bux to help open that many crates. Adding complementary IAP options like this will greatly increase your odds to persuade players into repeat purchasers.

I bought some special crates...

And needed some bux to open all those crates.

4. Delay with Refueling

In Pocket Planes, when a plane lands from a flight it's immediately ready for the next flight. I also played Pocket Planes religiously for 2 weeks straight, uninstalled, and then never played again. It's not a necessity to have delay in all F2P games, but I really encourage it for games that can be repetitive or shallow to break up sessions lengths to keep player's interest for longer periods of time.

In Pocket Trains, the trains have a certain amount of fuel that they can hold. After traveling, fuel regenerates at a rate of 1 fuel unit every 10 seconds. Players typically wait less than 20 minutes to refuel but this break helps them get away from repetitive tasks, or helps persuade them to monetize if they're in a pinch.

5. Daily Events

In Pocket Planes players could join a team (or flight crew) and participate in events that lasted a few days with other players. The concept sounds great on paper, but there were a few flaws.

  • There's no way to communicate with your flight crew in game.
  • There's no limit to how many players could be in a flight crews so just join a really large flight crew and you'll win. 
  • Events that last more than 1 day on mobile are extremely long. 

I liked the concept of a team event because it was turning a single player game into a multiplayer game, but I don't think it worked out as well as one might have hoped during the designing process.

NimbleBit fixed these event issues in Pocket Trains. They have daily events to encourage players to come back every day to participate and the events are completed on an individual basis versus a team event. This also complements the delay with refueling because players might spend bux to refuel their train or fast travel to a location in order to finish an event if they're close.

Let the Numbers Speak 

It's great to hear someone's opinion on why something is a better game or product, but as a reader I also want to see some validating points or data to backup claims. Here's the top grossing chart data the first couple weeks Pocket Planes was out.

As you can see the game hit its peak on the 5th day and then began to decline. Typically in a freemium game you want your game to level out and maintain. However, Pocket Planes never climbed back up to the position that it was at and was/is on a constant decline except when updates are released. Let's take a look at the Pocket Trains charts.

Now this is what I like to see in a F2P title. It quickly rose into the top 100 grossing and is staying there. Even though it didn't peak as high as Pocket Planes, I'm confident that Pocket Trains will make more in the end. Why didn't it peak as high as Pocket Planes? I don't know for certain, but I believe it's because of the similar style of game so some players aren't downloading, playing, or paying. As for me, I monetized (twice) in Pocket Trains when I never did in Pocket Planes. I hope Pocket Trains can maintain its position, but only time will tell.

If you'd like help designing or monetizing your games feel free to contact me or hit me on Twitter!

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Nimble Quest Finds its Way to the Ouya, Dev Talk on Forums https://www.gameskinny.com/vqvhs/nimble-quest-finds-its-way-to-the-ouya-dev-talk-on-forums https://www.gameskinny.com/vqvhs/nimble-quest-finds-its-way-to-the-ouya-dev-talk-on-forums Mon, 08 Jul 2013 17:09:41 -0400 Amanda Wallace

If you played Nimble Quest on Android or IOS, rejoice! The game is now available on the Ouya store.

NimbleBit, the company behind Nimble Quest, has been around since 2008 and primarily makes mobile games. Nimble Quest has been likened to a rogue-like combined with the classic arcade game Snake. 

The game has been "re-tuned" from its mobile version and is not a straight-up port, but the game still retains many of its properties, like unlocking heroes to increase the size of your party, gem collection, and joining guilds to complete guild quests with other players. 

NimbleBit has previously stated that they were going to have a game up and running on Ouya as soon as they were able. David Marsh of NimbleBit has said on Twitter that the game "plays better with a PS3 or 360 controller," after several users mentioned disliking the Ouya controllers D-pad. 

He also mentioned liking working with Ouya, as their system was "Purchase retail hardware > run game on hardware > submit game > review process > game published & anyone can play it."  If you're interested in playing Nimble Quest, you can play on the Ouya, or through the Google Play and IOS marketplace on mobile. 

NimbleBit is also hosting a discussion via the OUYA forums.

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