Which of Your Passwords Were Hacked By Heartbleed?

While the infamous Heartbleed bug terrorizes internet information, your game passwords might be at risk as well.

Heartbleed, one of the most daunting security breaches to ever encounter the internet, is wreaking havoc on widespread data.

This notable flaw in the protection of our information continues to jeopardize usernames and passwords cross-platform striking chaos and fear into the hearts of many. 

Essentially, many online services use OpenSSL which is aimed to scramble raw data, preventing hackers from accessing usernames and passwords directly.

However, Heartbleed is the loophole. 


Thinking About Changing Your Password? Don't. 

Although many people's first reaction to such a breach would be to just update passwords, you could actually be putting yourself more at risk. 

Unless the application you've changed your password to has updated its security protocol, your new password is just as accessible as your old one. This gives hackers all the more reason to target you, since you've given them two passwords instead of one. 

Which Games Were Affected?

Safe and Unaffected Applications
  • Battle.net
  • EVE Online
  • MLG.tv
  • Xbox Live
Fixed Applications (Change Your Password Immediately)
  • Apple Game Center
  • ArenaNet
  • Battlelog
  • Best Buy
  • Callofduty.com
  • GameStop
  • GOG.com
  • Humble Bundle
  • League of Legends
  • Minecraft.net
  • Nintendo
  • Origin
  • Playstation Store
  • Rockstar Games Social Club
  • Sony Online Entertainment
  • Steam
  • Wargaming
  • Twitch
  • Desura

Want To Know More?

If you're unsatisfied by the short explanation, you can find more information on Heartbleed here. The more educated you are, the more steps you can take to secure your information.

This handy Website Checker can also ease your mind by testing any URL for traces of the breach. 

Published Apr. 10th 2014
View Comments
  • Nick Vanderplop
    OK, heartbleed is a GLITCH, not a hacker, or a hack, or a virus. There have been no known hackers that have exploited this yet. How Heartbleed works is that sometimes computers send info to websites like this:
    "MrBob" changed his password to "fluffy"
    Joe bought a drill using credit card number 123456
    And after a while a browser will send something like this:
    If you are still there, say "I'm still here" (14 charachters long)
    And the site will respond like this:
    I'm still here
    But if a hacker were to somehow hack a browser to say:
    If you are still there, say "I'm still here" (200 charachters long)
    then the browser would reply:
    "MrBob" changed his password to "fluffy"
    Joe bought a drill using credit card number 123456
    I'm still here
    and then the hacker would have MrBob's password and Joe's credit card number. (Obviously this is greatly simplified)
    BUT, no use of this has been reported.
    What REALLY happened was that some Google people who spend 20% of their time on "Innovation" anyway, found this bug and posted it on the internet. Then someone saw "Heartbleed" and "Passwords are vulnerable" and immediately thought "HACKER!!!" then he or she freaked out posting all over the internet that EVERYBODY's passwords were in danger. The REAL reason you shouldn't change your password is that if "(YourName) changed his/her password to ____" is 20 million charachters behind whats happening then it might not get picked up by a hacker.
  • Matt_3949
    Where'd you get Apple Game Center from?

    The *only* thing that Apple has said about this is that “iOS and OS X never incorporated the vulnerable software and key web-based services were not affected.”

    I don't think that EA/Origin or Sony have said anything at all, and I never noticed them coming up as vulnerable in any scanners, so how do you know if they have been fixed or needed fixing?
  • Federico Senence
    Featured Contributor
    Thanks for the list!

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