Logitech G Pro Headset Review: Built for Pros, Made for Every Player

The Logitech G Pro analog gaming headset might not have surround sound, but it trumps its predecessor, the G433, where it counts.

Logitech's new G Pro gaming headset drops the frills and fancies found in other headsets to focus on what many gamers really want: great sound. Instead of RGB lighting and myriad software solutions, the G Pro is a plug-and-play, all-in-one answer for gamers that wanna get gaming right out of the box while encountering as few hurdles as possible. 

Last year, I tested the G Pro's predecessor, the G433 -- and I quite liked it. It had plug-and-play analog capabilities, but didn't do stereo sound the justice it deserves. And while that headset was comfortable and lightweight, my main gripe with it was that it didn't provide deep, crisp sound for the price -- even on the surround sound front. 

Perhaps it was kismet or that Logitech heard me through the collective conscious of the hardware world, but the G Pro headset comes much closer to the sound I wanted out of the G433. In reality, though, it was the pro gamers Logitech closely worked with to develop and design the G Pro that helped the company craft a headset that is built for pros and made for everyone. 

Coming in at $89, the G Pro is really what the G433s should have been from the start. For a hefty majority of average gamers, this headest will give them the pro-level gaming audio they've been looking for at a price they're mostly comfortable with. Sure, looking at the echelon in which it sits, the G Pro doesn't really stand out when compared to in-space competitors. But it stands toe to toe with them and rounds out Logitech's well-crafted headset line.

And if you're wondering what systems the analog G Pro works with, the answer is all of them. It'll work with your PS4, Xbox One, PC, Nintendo Switch, VR headsets, and mobile devices -- which is another big selling point. 

Logitech G PRO Gaming Headset  with all its connecting wires and removable earcup pads

Design 

Looking at the G Pro and the G433 side by side, it's almost impossible to distinguish the two based on appearances alone. From their lightweight polymer bodies to the adjustable steel headband and the left-earcup I/O ports for wires and mics, each is only truly distinctive by color and finish. Whereas the G433 comes in four different colors and wears a mesh finish from its earcups to its headband, the G Pro only comes in (sleek) black and a soft-touch, matte finish, the latter of which really accentuates the professional aesthetic Logitech is going for with these cans. 

Like its predecessor, the G Pro also features 100-degree rotatable earcups with detachable earpads. Here, the Logitech logo is more prominent and highlighted in silver on the outside of each earcup (another nice touch for the brand), while the word "Pro" is emblazoned in chic white just underneath the silver steel headband extenders on each side.

Overall, I'm glad to see that Logitech kept the design so similar between the models since the G433 was comfortable to wear and easy to carry from place to place. Weighing in at 259 grams (the same as the G433), the G Pro sits snugly across the head and can be worn for hours on end in relative comfort. It does feel a bit heavier than the previous model. And that's perhaps because of two things: it doesn't feel as flimsy from stem to stern as the G433, and the earcups fit more snugly along the sides of the face, causing a bit of discomfort over time. 

However, I'm also happy Logitech decided to keep the rotatable/tiltable earcups for this model. Not only can you lay these on your chest between matches or easily shove them in an overnight bag, you can also tilt the earcups up or down to quickly (and easily) hear any outside noise or conversation without removing the headset. It's a small design choice carried over from the G433, but one that's important for pro players that can't take their headsets off in between matches. 

Logitech G PRO Gaming Headset Side View with MicPerformance

If you're a pro or competitive gamer, you're playing games to win. Coming in second just isn't an option. That means you've got to hear your enemies before they hear you. It's something that the Logitech G533 does very well, as well as the SteelSeries Arctis Pro+. The problem is, those headsets either only work with PC or fall into the upper echelon of headset pricing (think $150-$250). 

And while those headsets are worth the pretty penny you'll pay for them, most gamers need something that affordably gives them good directional audio. The G433 didn't achieve that and ultimately felt too flat and thin overall during our tests. And when compared to the G Pro, which can clearly emit tones as low as 10hz and as high as 20Khz, that's even more evident. 

What's more, Logitech says that the Pro G provides "precise awareness of everything that's happening around you." And while I certainly don't agree that the awareness it provides is 100% precise, the G Pro does provide some of the better directional audio within the $90 price point. 

Tuned specifically for analog playback, the G Pro headset uses drivers that may be a bit bass-heavy, but work quite well at emitting clear sounds and ameliorating distortion. Testing the G Pros directly against the G433s showed that the Pros are more precise and consistent across the board. They do sacrifice a bit of volume for that sound consistency in comparison, but that's a worthy trade-off in our books. 

Playing Battlefield 1 and Far Cry 5, explosions felt appropriately large, and gunfire cracked with realism. Voices were warm and full, with dialog brimming with realism, easily parsed from music and diegetic effects. In all, sound felt fuller and richer than it did when wearing the G433s. 

The only real hiccup was that I wasn't able to dial in on pinpoint directional sound, meaning I could only tell from what general direction my adversaries were coming. Having directional capabilities at all is a step in the right direction considering you're able to get some semblance of 360 audio on console without dropping the big bucks, but it's also a bit of a carrot on a stick. If you want real directional audio, you're still going to have to shell out for it. 

When it comes to music, the G Pro provides meaty playback that's, again, heavy on the bass side of things. Listening to Leech and Rot by Northlane, kick drums and low-end chugs rise unmuddied through the mix. Mid-tone toms also come through nicely. Trebles tend to hang out in the background, although they aren't completely overshadowed. If you're used to a more treble-centric mix, you might not like that the Pros really focus on lower tones (although the headset does make those lows thick and powerful, like in Kendrick Lamar's DNA and Humble). 

Lastly, the G Pro claims to have up to 50% more passive noise isolation simply by proxy of the headset's premium earpads. And while I'd rather have active than passive noise cancellation, I think it works -- for the most part. At max volumes, it's hard to tell between the G Pros and the G433s -- immense volume tends to drown anything out simply by its overwhelming nature. But at around 55-60% volume, there is a discernible in-game difference in outside noise reduction with the G Pros. 

It's not perfect, and relying on passive devices always introduces variables into the equation, but I think it ultimately works as Logitech intends it to work: acting in tandem with the clear boom mic to better help pros hear the voices of their teammates in the din of the tournament stage. 

Logitech G PRO Gaming Headset tilted with mic and wireThe Verdict

With its Pro series, Logitech means to take existing designs and make them more approachable for professional gamers. They aren't out to redesign the wheel by any means -- and the G Pro gaming headset is testament to that. It takes the very best of the G433 and tweaks it to make something better. 

That something better doesn't necessarily mean "the best of the best," but what it does mean is the punchy G Pro is now firmly in the company of the best there is at $90. Inarguably, the G Pro is a step up from the G433, which doesn't look as appetizing as it once did -- especially when you compare sound profiles between the two headsets. 

And when compared to similar headsets on the market, such as the HyperX Cloud Flight and the Corsair Void Pro, the decision-making process can get a bit muddier, as those headsets take the G Pro head on. But we can say that the headset is much better than the SteelSeries Arctis 3, so keep that in mind when making your comparisons.

Ultimately, the G Pro is a well-made headset that performs very well either at home or on the tournament stage -- and whether you're listening to music or sniping sneaking players in team deathmatch. And for that, it gets our recommendation. 

Our Rating
8
The Logitech G Pro analog gaming headset might not have surround sound, but it trumps its predecessor, the G433, where it counts.

Senior Editor - Video

Platforms Tags gaming headsets 
Published Apr. 2nd 2018

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