Interview with Pigasus Games for Adventurezator: When Pigs Fly

Find out more about Adventurezator: When Pigs Fly as GameSkinny speaks with Petrucio from Pigasus Games.

If you enjoy point-and-click adventures and build-your-own games, then we have the game for you. Adventurezator: When Pigs Fly by Brazilian indie developer Pigasus Games has joined both genres in a fun and brilliant game.

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Pigasus Games even made a hilarious YouTube video that explains what Adventurezator really is. They explain it as an adventure sandbox, as if Monkey Island, Little Big Planet and The Sims got together, “had a threesome and created the Adventurezator.”

  • Adventure Sandbox: create and play your own adventures with no scripting or technical knowledge required
  • Workshop Support: share your creations, and easily play the best adventures the community has to offer
  • Free-form Object Interaction: objects dynamically interact with each other–no need to manually make a cup and a water fountain find what they can accomplish together
  • Actor Editor: create, save and share your own characters
  • Cutscene Editor: show the world your movie-directing abilities have been drastically underrated until now
  • Level Editor: easily drag, drop and rotate components to create your own levels
  • Campaign Editor: string your chapters together and create a world-spanning saga
  • Full-fledged Campaign and Stand-alone Extra Levels: for your enjoyment and to inspire greater creations
  • Post-launch Content: continuation of support with official and community-driven updates

I had the wonderful opportunity to speak with Petrucio of Pigasus Games about their game Adventurezator: When Pigs Fly and their experience with Steam Greenlight. Here’s what he had to say.

How did you come up with the idea for Adventurezator: When Pigs Fly?

It’s quite a long story, and I don’t think I can do it justice here, but I’ll try a short TL;DR version. The gist of it is that I wanted to ‘Sandbox’ the point-and-click adventure genre, after not being very happy with the over-simplification that a lot of modern point-and-clicks where taking, and being a fan of Minecraft. But it was not a ‘Eureka’ moment, but a coalescene of several ideas and refinements over several months.

What has been the most unexpected reaction from players interacting with the game?

I think the best unexpected reactions come from seeing unknown people play your game in unedited form, but we haven’t got much of that yet. Most of what we see is either written, or edited for previews and such. The best one so far that made me laugh was one guy playing the Arena level – there was an amputated leg in a room that you needed to wield in order to buff your attack stat, and he said “I should use that to arm myself. Or ‘leg’ myself….” But I’m sure now with workshop support and more people playing the game I’ll have more opportunities to be surprised.

Given there other “build-your-own games” on the market such as Project Spark, what makes Adventurezator: When Pigs Fly so different?

First, is that it’s focused on point-and-click adventure games, and no other “build-your-own games” out there come close to that.

Second, is that these products are usually quite complex. With Adventurezator, we want to allow anyone to scratch that game development itch. I always aim to keep what I call the ‘geekness’ factor as low as I can without sacrificing on flexibility, and I a constant balancing act when I’m thinking of features to add.

Cutscene Editor

Do you see Adventurezator: When Pigs Fly becoming available to consoles in the near future?

Assuming it does well on PC, then yes, that is very much something I’d like to see, both for consoles and mobiles. The sandbox tools are too complex for the limited input methods on these platforms, but it would be great to have a ‘player-only’ version on these platforms. But it’s still too early to tell.

What are some ideas for the game that didn’t make it to the production stage?

I guess the big one I would mention would be a replayer that would allow you to replay and edit a level after you’ve played it, and send it to YouTube. Adventures are singular in that they have a lot of downtime, but that downtime could be automatically edited out, making the replays easy to create and better to view than the normal gameplay. That is actually part of the genesis for the Adventurezator, which I didn’t really had time to get into on the first question. I still very much plan on implementing this, but it’s unclear at this stage if we’ll be able to.

Level Editor

What made you decide to turn to Steam Greenlight?

I don’t think there was anything to decide, really. Steam is so important for a PC-focused game without a publisher, entering Greenlight didn’t seem like much of a decision. The decision that we did do wrong was enter Greenlight too early, for reasons that I detailed in this article (http://gamasutra.com/blogs/PetrucioStange/20140504/216928/Greenlight_Forever.php).

Who is your team and what makes your team special?

The only permanent piece of the team that has been with the game all the way is me, but I’ve had some wonderful people helping me out along the way. All of us are industry veterans with several years of experience, even if that doesn’t say much here in Brazil. I guess if something makes us special is the love with all share for this project, as several people have said can clearly be seen on the end product.

Now that you’ve made Adventurezator: When Pigs Fly – what’s next?

Oh, it’s far from finished. It’s currently on Early Access, and after release we’ll think about porting it to consoles and mobiles, and adding more content after release. If successful, there’s still a lot to work on this title. If not, it’s likely that there won’t be a “next.”

I must say, I’m not one for build-your-own games but Adventurezator: When Pigs Fly changed my idea about it quite quickly. The framework involved is great and I’ll admit you’ll need to commit time. What I got was a wonderful experience in a game with an interesting twist. Check it out on Steam today.

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Author
Venisia Gonzalez
Venisia is a public relations professional, video game industry contractor, published author, freelance entertainment journalist, copy editor, a co-organizer of the Latinx Games Festival, and a member of the Latinx in Gaming and the Puerto Rico Game Developers (PRGD) community. Her passion is video games. She loves the adrenaline rush from a multiplayer match and understands the frustrations of a brand-new raid. Venisia finds immense value in gaming especially in the realm of mental health.