Final Fantasy 7 fans outraged at the decision to tone down The Honey Bee Inn for the Remake

Final Fantasy VII developers announce more changes, anger ensues.

Final Fantasy VII developers announce more changes, anger ensues.
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In a recent interview, the developers of the Final Fantasy VII Remake released a few more pieces of information regarding their plans for the game, as well as drawing the ire of many fans by stating that some of the content would need to be toned down for a modern audience.

Producer Toshinori Kitase and director Tetsuya Nomura stated in an interview with the Japanese games blog Esuteru that they would have to be “careful” about how they approach certain scenes due to the “time and social situation.” They made specific reference to The Honey Bee Inn as well as the date that occurs in Gold Saucer, possibly meaning that Barret will no longer be an option for Cloud’s moonlit cable car ride.

A real remake, not just visual upgrade

Final Fantasy VII Remake was arguably one of the most exciting announcements at E3 2015 because fans have been clamouring for this beloved classic to be brought into the modern age. Since its reveal, however, almost every change announced by the developers has angered the fans of the original, and this one has been no different.

Some Twitter users have furiously condemned these statements as pandering to political correctness, which they feel will ruin the game, but when taking a step back and looking at it objectively, it’s obvious that their actions make sound business sense.

Considering the fact that it’s basically accepted that Cloud was molested in The Honey Bee Inn by those burly chaps sporting 1970s porn ‘staches, if this scene in particular was to be remade with a modern, clearer graphics engine, the game’s age rating would have to be pushed up, essentially sacrificing the sales from any younger gamers who intend to play the game.

Pushing up the rating wouldn’t necessarily be a problem if the rest of the game was overtly sexual or violent, but if you’ve played the game you know that that isn’t the case. With that said, is it really worth losing out on potentially thousands, or even hundreds of thousands, of sales for the preservation of a few short scenes?

About the author

Glen Schoeman

Glen is an avid rock climber, sky diver and bungee jumper who tends to lie about enjoying outdoor activities when in reality, all he does is play a lot of video games.