The Cloud Stinger Wireless might be twice as much as the wired model, but it's one of the best wireless gaming headsets under $100.

HyperX Cloud Stinger Wireless Review: A Solid Wireless Offering

The Cloud Stinger Wireless might be twice as much as the wired model, but it's one of the best wireless gaming headsets under $100.

In 2016, we reviewed the wired version of the Cloud Stinger. We gave it a 10/10, with our writer saying “I would go so far as to say that the Cloud Stinger is the best gaming headset I’ve ever owned.”

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That’s ostensibly high praise. 

Recently, the company released a variant of that headset in the Cloud Stinger Wireless. For all intents and purposes, it’s nearly identical to the wired version of the headset. Because of that, we’ll be primarily looking at the differences in this review. For a more in-depth analysis of the headset, be sure to check the review above. 

One thing is important to get out of the way up front, though: the Cloud Stinger Wireless is double the price of the wired version. Coming in at $99.99, it’s on the higher end of mid-tier, and you’re essentially paying $50 for wireless functionality. 

Don’t misunderstand, it’s not necessarily a bad thing. It’s simply something you should know up front and be aware of as we talk more about the headset. 

 

Design

The wireless version of the Cloud Stinger sports the same all-black primary aesthetic as the wired version. The primary deviations here are that the HyperX logo on the outside of each earcup is black as well, whereas the logo was red in the wired version, and there is a blue flourish around the earcups.  

Personally, I miss the splash of color on the earcups. But then again, I’m only looking at the headset when I’m not wearing it, so it’s an ultimately tiny gripe. 

The headset is more lightweight than ever before. The wired version weighed in at 275g, and the wireless weighs in at 270g. The chassis still feels a tad flimsy, but it’s comfortable across the jaw and across the top of the head. I was able to wear the headset for hours working, watching YouTube videos, and playing games without any pain or discomfort. 

Once you dial in the right fit, the headset stays put. 

Both earcups still swivel 90 degrees, so you can lay them on your chest, easily shove them into an overnight bag, or lay them flat on your desk. As I say every time I get the chance, it’s a feature I love and one I think should be on every headset. 

On the right earcup, you’ll find the volume wheel, which works great and is relatively quiet when moving. On the left earcup, you’ll find the USB charging port, the wireless on/off button, and the somewhat noise-canceling, flip-to-mute mic. 

Performance

Since there isn’t any nifty hardware or surround sound to talk about here, let’s just jump right into how the Cloud Stinger Wireless performs. 

In our original review, our writer said that the wired version of the Cloud Stinger “still boasts the full spectrum of sound quality that you’d expect from the brand. Deep bass tones reverberate without sounding buzzy, and higher pitches come through without getting too tinny.”

For the most part, I tend to agree with those statements. In my time with the wireless version of the headset, highs and mids were crisp; lows didn’t tread into muddy waters, although they weren’t as punchy as some other headsets on the market. For heavier music, there was ferocity behind some of the heaviest bits. 

Overall, the full spectrum experience was pleasant, once again making it easy to give HyperX high marks for driver design. 

One thing I appreciate about the headset is that the sound doesn’t decrease or grow louder when you turn your head from side to side. Some other headsets are guilty of that vexing idiosyncrasy, and while not damning, sully the overall experience. Luckily, that’s not the case here.

Another tick in the “good” checkbox is that they’re also loud without having to jack the sound up on either the headset, the computer, or the PS4. I like to listen to my music and games loud; few things are as frustrating as not being able to get the volume you want and are comfortable with. 

The only real negative here lies in the headset’s wireless range. While the headset has a wireless range of 12 meters (which is most likely good enough for 99% of users), I did notice that I wasn’t able to go too far downstairs from my PC at home.

Although my kitchen is just below my office, the signal started cutting out during testing; my Logitech G533s are able to easily manage that distance with the same obstructions.

Lastly, the mic is average, producing mostly clear communication, even if it does pick up some background noise. 

Pros:
  • Works for PC, PS4, PS4 Pro, Nintendo Switch (in dock mode)
  • Fantastic sound quality that defines HyperX
  • Extremely comfortable
  • Under $100
Cons
  • Does not currently support Xbox One or mobile
  • Does not have a wired option built-in
  • Range is iffy, not as strong as some other cans
  • Does not have customization options

The main takeaway here is this: if you’ve been wanting the wireless version of the Cloud Stinger, this is a no-brainer. And if you’ve been looking for a comfortable, reliable, and great sounding wireless headset under $100, you’d do well to consider this newest model. 

There’s not much at all to complain about here. Even though I’ve opined about the range, it’s adequate for most users.

I could nitpick these to death, but I won’t. These are a good set of cans. 

[Note: A Cloud Stinger Wireless review unit was provided by HyperX for the purpose of this review.]

9
HyperX Cloud Stinger Wireless Review: A Solid Wireless Offering
The Cloud Stinger Wireless might be twice as much as the wired model, but it's one of the best wireless gaming headsets under $100.

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Author
Jonathan Moore
Jonathan Moore is the Editor-in-Chief of GameSkinny and has been writing about games since 2010. With over 1,200 published articles, he's written about almost every genre, from city builders and ARPGs to third-person shooters and sports titles. While patiently awaiting anything Dino Crisis, he consumes all things Star Wars. He has a BFA in Creative Writing and an MFA in Creative Writing focused on games writing and narrative design. He's previously been a newspaper copy editor, ad writer, and book editor. In his spare time, he enjoys playing music, watching football, and walking his three dogs. He lives on Earth and believes in aliens, thanks to Fox Mulder.