Nude Bayonetta Playboy Spread Looks Like Bad Cosplay

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When it comes to sexualized characters, Bayonetta is near the top of the list. So it's no surprise that Nintendo of America has allegedly partnered with Playboy to pair their tantalizing franchise with nude model Pamela Horton. 

However, the pictures fail to titillate. 

Published Oct. 27th 2014
  • Haru _6910
    I think the reason it does not look good is because the model is too short to accurately portray the character. If you look at the picture where her back is facing us, her legs appear especially short. Two of the key points to Bayonetta's design is her extra-elongated limbs and her small head (which was intended to balance out her hairstyle from the first game). It's like doing a cover of a Michael Jackson song, the effort is appreciated but it's difficult to do it justice.
  • Amanda Wallace
    Former Staff Editor
    Yeah, I think one of the issues is that Bayonetta is incredibly elongated in an unnatural way. Even if the particular model was not short, this would be a difficult shoot to cast without Photoshopping the poor model in a ridiculous way. I think it's also why the stronger shots are the ones focused more on her head.
  • Rhys Bjornsen_5219
    Disclaimer: I haven't played Bayonetta 2 (don't have a Wii U), so I have only trailers and a few gameplay excerpts to work off.

    I think the reason why the Playboy stills don't work is that they just try to represent 'sexy Bayonetta poses', whereas the real attraction of the Bayonetta character appears to be in the whole package: how she looks, how she acts, how she reacts, how she uses her sexuality (sensuality?) for her own purposes, on her own terms. Few stills manage to capture that.

    Side note: I can see why people would have problems with pandering, fan-service camera angles: it diminishes the power the character possesses. Take the trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amFu1hsOtuM at 00:31 seconds, where crotch-shotted Bayonetta says 'No one said you could touch.' and pulls a gun. Imagine how much more powerful that scene would be if she didn't point the gun at somebody off-screen, but at you, the viewer.
  • Amanda Wallace
    Former Staff Editor
    I think that's an incredibly valid point. Bayonetta is a powerful figure, and from what I understand, a lot of people find that "you can look but you can't touch" appeal very sexy.

    This probably explains why a lot of pornographic material about her is allegedly dom/sub fantasies. Playboy kind of took some of that power away.

    As an unrelated note, have you thought about writing articles on the site? GS is an open platform and you are incredibly articulate.
  • Rhys Bjornsen_5219
    I found that "You can look, but you can't really see" is what in general fuels the really powerful photographs, movies, and performances (not just erotic ones - it equally applies to e.g. horror) - but it is a difficult rope to cross. It does explain, for example, why things like lingerie exist.

    On an unrelated note: I think this was just a case of me "having a moment", because this topic has been on my mind for a week or so now, I have discarded all my irrelevant thoughts by rambling on other site's forums by now, and had time to condense my opinion, and fine-tune my expression of which. In general, I just don't play enough games often enough to have an opinion.

    Though, I think I'm a decent ghost-reader still.
  • Amanda Wallace
    Former Staff Editor
    I guess it depends on the lingerie? Depending on the brand, lingerie is often marketed towards women rather than men showing that it's power structure is perhaps in line with the desires of the woman rather than the man. Perhaps it plays into the idea of being "beautiful" or being a package to be unwrapped? (It's often presented as the second one) There's less of that power/submission thing we were talking with Bayonetta, and more of "presentation."

    That is ultimately up to you, but I'm telling you as an editor that you are incredibly articulate.
  • Rhys Bjornsen
    I say that it depends less on the lingerie itself, but the context and purpose it is being used in and for. If the context is "I'm a package - come and unwrap me!" - nope, I'm not really interested. But if the context is "I'm sexy, and I know it - but are /you/ worthy enough?" - then I'm interested, because the outcome is unknown. But I can imagine that for some people it is also a scary context because of the very same reason.

    And at this point I can't resist circling back to how Bayonetta was presented in the game trailers, and how much better the trailers could have been - namely, that the '/you/' was somebody off-screen, and not the viewers themselves. The position of the viewer, nee potential player, was never called into question in those scenes. ... and now that I think of it - that would be the case even if Bayonetta would be replaced by a gruff cigar-stomping squad sergeant of bog-standard action game - but I feel that is a tangent for another day.

    Now that you planted the seed in my mind, I'll think about it. If I have something I deem worthwhile publishing to a larger audience, I'll be in touch.

    Edit: clarification (hopefully) of what I meant to say.
  • Brian Spaen
    Featured Correspondent
    The photoshoot looks incredibly rushed and not properly thought out. If they really wanted to do this, they could have spent more time on poses, costumes, backgrounds, and more.
  • Pierre Fouquet
    Featured Contributor
    I mean it stays true to the character... but this really doesn't help the argument againt over sexualation of woman in both society and in gaming... and yes I agree with Venisia, it does look kinda trashy.
  • Venisia Gonzalez
    Featured Columnist
    It looks kind of trashy in my opinion.

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