Dead Space Mobile Articles RSS Feed | GameSkinny.com Dead Space Mobile RSS Feed on GameSkinny.com https://www.gameskinny.com/ en Launch Media Network Seven Games That Should Have Multiplayer https://www.gameskinny.com/uw41a/seven-games-that-should-have-multiplayer https://www.gameskinny.com/uw41a/seven-games-that-should-have-multiplayer Sat, 16 May 2015 14:00:34 -0400 Elijah Beahm

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BioShock: Infinite

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Why do I specifically cite the E3 2011 version of Bioshock Infinite? Because a lot of what we see here could easily have worked as a multiplayer mode. Calling up tears that have to go on a recharge timer? Check. Using Vigors more like special grenades than as Plasmids? Check. Massive maps with numerous vantage points, skylines, and destructible pieces (such as the blimp)? Check, check, check.

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Bioshock 2: Fall of Rapture had an outstanding multiplayer mode, which is why people still actively play it even though Bioshock 2 released in 2010. The fact the best Irrational Games could come up with for Infinite was a pinball-style tower defense mini-game and a co-op mode (both of which never made it in the final game) is depressing. Granted, I realize my suggested alternative isn't the farthest out of the box.

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Really, the Fall of Rapture framework, other than specific mechanics like hacking turrets/vending machines, is just fine as a template here. Narrative provided through the player's apartment and audio diaries works as well in Columbia as it did in Rapture. Unlocking new weapons, vigors, gear, and weapon modifiers fits just fine as a progression system. Even maps with little winks and their own narrative touches is part of what made Fall of Rapture feel like a true Bioshock game, so include similar level design here.

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Really, all you are doing is trading mechanics. Instead of hacking, include Skyhooks and skylines to ride. Instead of a Big Daddy suit, either have a random Heavy Hitter that can be triggered, or a one team can use the combat blimp like the Gunship in Call of Duty. Make the levels a bit less cramped and... ladies and gentlemen, I present to you, Bioshock Infinite's multiplayer.

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Much like with Fallout 4, it's just not that complicated to see a multiplayer mode working. I'm sure something more imaginative could be accomplished in a cooperative space, but that would be limited either in replayability or in the amount of content easily made. For Bioshock, competitive multiplayer works surprisingly well, so I'd say stick with what works.

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Is there any game you wish would add multiplayer? Have an alternative idea for the ones mentioned above? Let us know in the comments below!

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Alien: Isolation

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Back when Alien: Isolation was leaked, it was listed as an Xbox Live game with up to four-player multiplayer. This was the original element that interested some gamers, as the potential there is quite intriguing. While we've seen plenty bombastic Alien Versus Predator multiplayer, we have yet to see a subdued, Damned-style Alien multiplayer experience.

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In future Alien: Isolation games, Creative Assembly should really consider testing multiplayer. Co-op was apparently briefly tested, but promptly dropped. What if, instead of co-op, we took the game's highly praised survival mode, and take it to the furthest extreme. What if we make one to three players survivors, who have to achieve goals, whilst another player controls a xenomorph alien - perhaps a little bit similar to Evolve.

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Players would need to remain stealthy, and extremely clever. This would be the ultimate test of skill for many players, and every death of a teammate would intensify each players' terror drastically. You could still use your flamethrower to deter the xenomorph, but it will do little more than require it retreat for a time before spawning in a new vent. Your resources, unlike its respawns, would also be limited and would require searching the level.

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The best part of this is that the xenomorph would be genuinely unpredictable. Maybe the player controlling the xenomorph is overly aggressive and can be easily avoided due to lack of finesse on their part. Or the xenomorph player decides to toy with players, sneaking up on them when they least expect it, and leaving little hint of its presence.

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So as a result, we get the cooperative experience that Alien: Isolation could have had, but also get a competitive multiplayer that touches directly on what makes Alien: Isolation such a great horror game. I, for one, hope we see something like that with whatever Alien: Isolation 2 turns out to be.

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Dead Space 4

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With word now that Visceral Games' developers are open to a new Dead Space game, it seems appropriate for the series to finally settle what kind of multiplayer it's going to have. The first game was single-player because co-op was proposed too late into development, and the game engine wasn't optimized yet. Later, Dead Space 2 had competitive multiplayer that was great fun, but had limited content and a few balancing issues. Dead Space 3 took the experience cooperative, but also unfortunately fumbled its gameplay by grafting in a weapon crafting system as well.

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The next Dead Space game could go in any direction, but what it needs to do is pick one. If it's going to have co-op, then its cramp levels need to better support it. If it's going to have competitive multiplayer, then it either needs to seriously retool (or better yet, drop) the current weapon crafting system.

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Either way, tightness of Dead Space 2's shooting will also need to return. Dead Space 3 put more emphasis on splash damage and cones of fire, and this took way too much away from the focus on precisely dismembering enemies.

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The competitive multiplayer should still retain the narrative focus (a la Killzone 3's Operations mode) that the original Dead Space 2 multiplayer emulated. Except now, there should be more branching options, and flipped goals. Maybe the necromorphs go on the offensive instead of the humans. If humans fail an objective, why not give them an alternate last-ditch one to save the match and get them back on track? Variety is the key to any multiplayer mode, and it is what Dead Space 4 needs badly if it wants to outdo its predecessors.

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A cooperative experience should both include a standard horde mode (seriously, why is it only the mobile Dead Space game that has this?) and a cooperative story mode. Except it shouldn't also be the main campaign, or in any way dramatically impact our single-player experience. No story content locked behind magic co-op doors, Visceral.

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Lastly, if we really want to be ambitious and include all the above modes of play, then some kind of united upgrade system (a la Splinter Cell: Blacklist) should be considered. Nothing to the extent of Metal Gear Solid: Peacewalker, where you'd have opponents with vastly better late-game gear. Instead, you'd merely be able to spend in-game currency and upgrades on the game's competitive, cooperative, and single-player unlocks.

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So you'd play single-player to unlock extra suits with unique effects, play the competitive mode to grind for upgrade points, and chill with a friend in co-op to experience a cool side story. It all works in unison without stepping on anyone's feet. Here's hoping we see something like that in Dead Space 4.

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Deus Ex: Mankind Divided

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I remember playing Deus Ex: Human Revolution back in 2011, and remarking on how well the mechanics could work in a multiplayer setting if tweaked and rebalanced. Now that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided looks to be doing those very same rebalances and improvements, I really hope we see a multiplayer mode added to the game.

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Once again, the game's setting offers perfect potential. With A.R.C., Task Force 29, the Illuminati, and the mysterious hacker group, there are four different factions at play. On top of this, the game has three combat-oriented playstyles that all could work well in a multiplayer setting: hacking, action, and stealth.

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Imagine it like a mixture of Aliens Versus Predator, Bioshock 2: Fall of Rapture, and Watch_Dogs. Team One has a hacker who opens access to vents and turns on a remote controlled turret he/she can control from the console. Team Two has a stealthy player who uses the vents to sneak behind lines and take out the hacker. A combat focused player could shoot the stealthy hacker, but then be taken out by Team Two's hacker patching into Team One's turret. It's a perfect Rock-Paper-Scissors effect.

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The controls and mechanics are also highly fluid and intuitive. Stealth takedowns could work great, but can only be done if you aren't in a player's line of sight (excluding if you're invisible). Combat takedowns can be done at any time, but leave you vulnerable to being shot -- just like hacking. Items could be looted from your opponents and the environment. The quick select wheel/bar lets you easily access your inventory on the fly. Energy bars keep everything balanced, and encourage using augmentation sparingly.

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Levels could actually include lots of twists and turns, and the variety of locales available means each could be visually distinctive. Leveling up would unlock augmentations and other new gameplay options. Players would get at least one loadout for each playstyle, which they could swap between lives. You'd also be able to use any equipment found mid-match, regardless of whether you'd unlocked it yet or not.

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The original Deus Ex had a popular multiplayer that even got a Human Revolution-themed mod way back. So let's bring it back in full force, even if some of the fanboys will cry "I NEVER ASKED FOR THIS".

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Fallout 4

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Co-op in the wasteland, Bethesda. We've made a mod for this in Fallout 3 (and partially in Fallout: New Vegas). It can be completely optional, and players can just let a friend tag along (like in Saints Row games). Seriously, this is even simpler than Assassin's Creed: Syndicate's ability to support multiplayer modes.

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You could trade resources between each other, including better gear your partner may have unlocked, like in Borderlands. Also like Borderlands, the combat difficulty could scale for the increase in active players. It would be especially ideal for those who don't normally play hardcore RPGs like Fallout, as their more experienced friends could help them survive the Wasteland.

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The most interesting potential, though, is if players have different faction allegiances, and they use these to make new quest branches that otherwise wouldn't be possible. Imagine you and a friend igniting a war, or preventing one, by using your various connections and allegiances. The potential in the game's sandbox is very enticing.

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No one really wants a competitive Fallout game, and I honestly can understand that. The series has never been about competition, but survival and personal stories. So let us build stories together, Bethesda, and tear down the wall preventing friends from playing with each other.

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Assassin's Creed: Syndicate

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Yes, I've already spoken at length about how the exclusion of multiplayer makes very little sense when it comes to Assassin's Creed: Syndicate, but there's more to it than that. The game is just basically begging for a multiplayer of some kind, because of its entire meta-game in the story.

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The Assassins and Templars are both running gangs, who are even color-coded. You face off against rival gang leaders in the main story, leading brawls against their goons and finally fighting them one-on-one. Meanwhile, your faction accrues power and influence, gaining new gear and resources. That doesn't sound like a single-player game, that sounds almost like one of those Facebook "strategy" games.

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Now I am not saying Assassin's Creed: Syndicate should emulate Facebook -- far from it (please Ubisoft, of all things, do not emulate Facebook). All of the traditional multiplayer modes in past games make way more sense here. Almost every mode makes sense in these circumstances. Wanted, Assassinate, Manhunt, Artifacts, and Wolfpack in particular make way more sense. You need to steal from rival gangs and take out opposing gang leaders. A simpler set-up could not be handed to Ubisoft.

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The multiplayer could be heavily integrated with the single-player, and better yet, they could finally make offline variants. Imagine having all the content of past multiplayer titles, but you could also play it against bots in-game. It could even increase mission variety. This is so obvious that it just makes the exclusion all the more disappointing.

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Batman: Arkham Knight

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The aversion Rocksteady has had with bringing multiplayer to the Batman: Arkham series will remain one of the most profoundly divisive decisions the franchise heads have ever made. Fans have begged to at least have co-op. Even at the end of the line, after Batman: Arkham Origins' Invisible Predator Online clearly proved that playing as the Dynamic Duo can be done right in an online experience. And yet here we all are, looking at another solo experience.

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Don't get me wrong - the Arkham games are some of the finest single-player experiences from last-gen, and Arkham Knight will easily be one of the best next-gen games to come. Rocksteady has this formula down to a T. That's why it makes no sense to not try and do some sort of multiplayer. Whether it's a rebalanced and expanded version of the Batman: Arkham Origins multiplayer (which for some of us, was the only redeeming factor of Arkham Origins), or a cooperative experience, we want to see it. 

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Imagine solving a Riddler house full of puzzles, combat, and exploration. Almost like a hybrid brawler/dungeon crawler, it would require two players (they could choose between the current cast of challenge mode characters and DLC additions) to navigate the mechanical hell-hole and make it to the other side intact. There could be alternate solutions based on what character you play as, and levels themselves could be randomized, like in Dragon Age: Inquisition.

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Both Invisible Predator Online and a co-op mode could even tie into the game's Challenge Mode, which has been a staple of the series and kept many fans digging into the game's nuanced combat mechanics. It makes perfect sense, but it needs the developers to take it seriously.

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While some developers might feel that staying away from multiplayer improves a product, there are always games that are solid material for experiences gamers can share. With so many new games coming out, and some promising IPs, there's never been so many divergent and unique multiplayer games and modes. So in the spirit of new frontiers, here are seven titles that should totally give multiplayer a try.

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The 10 AAA Game Franchises That Need to Come to PS Vita https://www.gameskinny.com/no59i/the-10-aaa-game-franchises-that-need-to-come-to-ps-vita https://www.gameskinny.com/no59i/the-10-aaa-game-franchises-that-need-to-come-to-ps-vita Sun, 29 Mar 2015 13:15:09 -0400 Elijah Beahm

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Resident Evil 4

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Lastly, the game that's been ported to everything under the sun besides dedicated gaming handhelds (it's even available on iPhone and iPad): Resident Evil 4. I'm tempted to suggest bringing Resident Evil 5 over, but some of its set pieces and over-the-top moments might stress out the hardware too much. On the flipside, Resident Evil 4 is perfect for the PS Vita.

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It's familiar, but still new to a number of players. It's compact, but has plenty of content. It's incredibly replayable and never leans on excessive grinding or any other cheap tactics used to keeping you from progressing. It looks great, but doesn't demand a lot from hardware.

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While it's been re-released so many times that it's starting to get silly, I can't deny that Resident Evil 4 would be a welcome game on PS Vita. Just, maybe add in co-op for Mercenaries mode?

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Diablo III: Reaper of Souls

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Here's an oddity for you. Silent Hill: Book of Memories and Dungeon Hunter Alliance are available on the PS Vita, yet somehow Diablo III: Reaper of Souls is not? Why are we left only with a weird spin-off of a different franchise and a hack job rip-off instead of a port from the series that started it all?

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There's not even much that needs to be said, it's just that sensible and reasonable. We know it can work, because two games just proved that the handheld can do the job. So let's bring Diablo III: Reaper of Souls to Vita, Blizzard.

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Orcs Must Die!

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It may have started out as a small-scale indie, but Robot Entertainment seems to be making their best effort to turn Orcs Must Die! into a AAA franchise. As such, let's bring the original two titles to the Vita. The cartoony visuals fit a handheld well, the AI for enemies is incredibly simple, so that takes a load off the CPU, allowing for greater amounts of hit processing and physics-based traps.

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The game might need to shrink back the amount of traps and enemies that spawn, but the it would still be a rollicking good time on the handheld. It also works great for the Vita as the touch screens could be used to play traps and swap inventory selection instantly.

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Portal

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Given Sony and Valve's chummy relationship, I'm a bit surprised we haven't seen some version of Portal on the PS Vita. Fans have already gotten remakes of the game to work on PSP, Nintendo DS, and 3DS, so what's holding Valve back from making it official on a platform that could easily run the game?

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Honestly, other than possible business reasons or lack of interest, I can't think of any. Plus imagine Portal 2 co-op, where one of you is playing on Vita while the other is on PS3. That would be pretty damn sweet, if I say so myself.

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Splinter Cell

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If CounterSpy taught me anything, it's that the PS Vita is a great platform for slick stealth games, and there should really be more of them. As such, let's bring over Splinter Cell. Whether it be remakes of the originals, a new spin-off, or a downgraded version of the more controversial past two entries, there should be a Splinter Cell game on Vita.

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The touch screens and gyroscope make tons of sense for the gadgets that protagonist Sam Fischer is constantly using. The snap to cover, Mark and Execute, and free range of world navigation fit a handheld very well. The compact yet maze-like levels are just right for the Vita's processing power.

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Classic Spies Vs. Mercs should work, but going beyond two versus two might stress the hardware, especially if Ubisoft were to push for high fidelity. Still, the title could make for a great co-op/single-player stealth game for handheld gamers who want meatier titles.

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Killzone

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Also befitting the strategy genre, why isn't there an RTS or turn-based Killzone game on the Vita? Killzone: Mercenary is fine for shooting things up, but the universe is primed and ready for a strategy game. With the touchscreen capability and eye-in-the-sky view, it could even potentially be a cross-platform PS4/PS Vita game.

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It would be in the vein of Advanced Wars and Command & Conquer, focusing on key battles instead of any kind of 4X strategy. The game could either span the original Killzone trilogy or it could offer Wing Commander-style missions where the story will branch based on your victory or defeat in certain scenarios.

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On top of this, depending on how the levels work, we could see the first game besides Littlebig Planet Vita that would offer user-generated content. Imagine players sharing battlefields and scenarios between friend and foe alike, testing their mettle as the ISA and Helghast fight on and on. That certainly sounds like a good time to me.

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XCOM: Enemy Unknown

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Much like Bioshock, XCOM: Enemy Unknown (and its expansion Enemy Within) has done well on the iOS market. It seems only natural to consider bringing it to the PS Vita. Combining the touch screen controls with secondary the buttons should be easy, and remove any control issues you might have. The graphics scale down easily, and game is ideal for both quick play and long-term gaming on your handheld.

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Bioshock

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While Ken Levine's Bioshock strategy RPG may never come to be, it's already been proven that the original game can work well even on a tablet. So why haven't we brought the first two games in the award winning franchise to PS Vita?

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Much like Dead Space, the Bioshock series is built on older tech, so optimization is less of an issue. On top of that, there's already the Ultimate Rapture Edition bundle combining the entire experience, so the only work that needs to be done is porting the two games over.

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The biggest change would actually be to the multiplayer. Once again, it'd be good to have a game with solid and unique competitive PvP action on a handheld that's practically begging for it. Bioshock 2's multiplayer stood the test of time and still is active on current platforms, so the key thing would just be to scale things down. We might need to bring it down to twelve players total, but that's still another online option for Vita gamers.

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Seriously, there's not that much else that would need changing. The games might need to be released on separate carts due to the size of each, but beyond that, it's just getting the games to run on it. And if 2K is willing to get the original running on an iPhone, they shouldn't have much trouble with a powerhouse like the VIta.

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Dead Space

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Dead Space is a series known for being deep and visceral, but there's one fact most people don't know -- it's built on the Godfather engine from the original Xbox. This is why the first two games run especially well on fairly old PCs.

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If Dead Space 2 can run on an integrated graphics card with my laptop, I see no reason a slight visual downgrade couldn't bring at least the first four games (counting the light-gun Extraction spin-off and the mobile game) to PS Vita, either as a collection or separately. Even better, Dead Space: Extraction and Dead Space Mobile could actually be given a visual upgrade.

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This also would be great for the Vita because Dead Space 2's multiplayer is so perfect for a handheld. A game of 4 vs 4 is not too extraneous for the Vita, and the multiplayer maps were also nicely compact with numerous paths, much like Killzone Mercenary. Toss in a few new maps and maybe a co-op version of Dead Space Mobile's survival mode, and we're good to go.

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Realistically, if you broke them up into two packages, one holding Extraction and Dead Space, and the other holding Dead Space 2 and Mobile, you'd have two decent budget bundles.

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Star Wars: Battlefront

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Star Wars: Battlefront is making its triumphant return on consoles and PC later this year, and I see no reason for the series to pass on another mobile spin-off. It's been years since Star Wars Battlefront: Elite Squadron graced the PSP, and with the power of the PS Vita, we could have a truly impressive Star Wars handheld game.

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While the graphics might have to suffered a bit, Elite Squadron got sixteen player battles working on the PSP. Imagine that kind of optimization on the Vita. Battlefront might be able to offer us our first twenty-four player battles on the Vita, potentially with Elite Squadron's air-to-ground battle system and customizable classes.

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Now, it would be separate from the console version of Battlefront, but that doesn't mean there couldn't be some cross-platform integration. Perhaps character progression could carry over between versions. Alternatively, playing each version could unlock extra missions and visual customization, similar to Assassin's Creed 3 and Assassin's Creed: Liberation. Either way, it would incentivize gamers and give them the option to play both at home and on the go, without either version hampering the other in scope or focus.

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So we've discussed why you should totally keep your PS Vita. Now let's talk about something different entirely. Sony's support of the handheld has been lackluster of late, and the platform would really benefit from a few key titles arriving. To go along with Farrel's list, here are my picks for games that realistically could work on the PS Vita. From shooters to strategy games, these series totally should make the jump to Sony's handheld.

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Finding Religion in Dead Space https://www.gameskinny.com/t6qh4/finding-religion-in-dead-space https://www.gameskinny.com/t6qh4/finding-religion-in-dead-space Tue, 15 Apr 2014 21:12:27 -0400 Elijah Beahm

This article was previously posted, un-edited on my blog on Game Informer.

Spoilers for Dead Space 1-3 ahead!

To be clear, I am a professed Protestant Christian. While I subscribe to no particular sect, my religious belief is very important to me. Normally I've accepted that most developers retain a secular outlook for their games so as to not offend anyone, but in the process, I feel we're leaving a really important conversation out of the medium for fear of upsetting people.

We live in a world where religion is hotly debated as Atheists proclaim the end of religion as we know it while religious leaders become increasingly fundamentalist and conservative. Not addressing that conflict in games is a serious disservice to both secular and religious gamers. We want to hear about what's going on there, and if games are genuinely supposed to become art, they cannot always avoid controversy.

Dead Space manages to touch upon the majority of faith-related issues without even intending to.

Visceral Games (formerly EA Redwood) set out to make a game that had no overlay HUD and included dismemberment, stasis, and telekinesis in a horror setting. That's all they planned for, with a full description of the universe by the game's creator for the writers to take from as they would to develop an appropriate title. It became the survival shooter we've all come to know, spanning the twilight years of this console generation and even expanding onto mobile phones and the Wii. It was a success, all things considered, but most didn't really notice the potential underlying religious themes, save for one point. The anti-blind faith argument brought about by the game's main antagonistic agency The Church of Unitology.

The Church of Unitology is compared by many to the Church of Scientology. The organizations share similar traits, such as a more monetary focus for their organizations, secret society mentalities, suspicious conspiracies about what really goes on behind closed doors with suggestions of political and social manipulation. However, this is the tip of the iceberg with Unitology.

Unitology is one of the greatest examples of blind faith, especially believing without any understanding; a dangerous concept to say the least.

In Unitology, we see the cult-like mentality and the herding of sheep-like people that violates the core ideals of free will. Members of the Church willing kill themselves and others, and in the case of Dead Space mobile cause the entire outbreak on Titan Station in Dead Space 2. The fanaticism is presented through all its variations. In Dead Space, it's of desperation, trying to cling to beliefs in the face of danger. In Dead Space 2, it's a cold, borderline-psychotic calm and devotion mixed with frustration and rage at your insistence to refuse and never give in. By the finale, we're even presented the "scientific" angle of an arrogant leader in the Church who claims it is not faith but reason and science that drew him to believe in the notorious creators of all the havoc in the series, the alien Markers.

Unitology also fits for some Atheists as the example of all religion, viewing even the best members of the religious sect to be lemmings heading toward a cliff, such as the Unitologist crew member in the tie-in film Dead Space: Downfall. No matter the case though, Unitology is the extreme. It's the manipulation of church and state to the ends of but a few with the intentions of twisting the masses to their very goals until it's too late for those poor people to escape. It is the dark side of religion, the greatest evil that can happen with it. It unflinchingly hands you almost every aspect of its belief system with a cheery smile while it runs at you with a sharpened kitchen knife and your bank account in hand. It is terrifying, but if you do so much as breath a negative word about it in front of it's believers, you will have a hornets nest flying at you.

It makes you bitter, angry, and frustrated -- much like it does to protagonist Isaac Clarke. We learn through additional data logs earned by using New Game Plus in the original game that most of his family's wealth, which had been considerable, was spent by his mother when she became enraptured by the Church of Unitology. With Isaac's father far off on an EarthGov mission, he was forced him to work his way through schools far below his expertise. Before long he is alone in the cold world, disconnected from his missing father and zealot mother.

Despite this, we never hear of Isaac's beliefs beyond his understandable opposition to Unitology.

Interestingly enough, he is never confirmed an Atheistic or religious man, although he rarely uses God's name in vain, unlikely most protagonists. He's a blank slate in that respect, which makes him a good protagonist for such a divisive topic. We can apply our beliefs to his actions and for most religious groups, find him to behave honorably.

Isaac especially fits the Christian and secular ideal of a good man. He stands up against a threat no matter how big it is, willing to put his life on the line even if it only saves one other person. He repeatedly tries to negotiate and deal with his opponents in a non-violent manner, resorting to violence only when there is no other option and lives are at stake. He is understanding and considerate of other people's needs. Even in Dead Space 3, where we find our hero giving into fear, he realizes that he has to accept the responsibility handed to him, even if he detests having to be the "Marker Killer."

But all this is could just be some convenient lining up of parallels. How on earth is it an allegory? The core gameplay and necromorphs are where the full allegory exists, even without the context and story. In Dead Space, the necromorphs are a menace two-fold. They are a threat to the living, and to the dead. With both, they seek to convert them (notice that key word there?) into one of their one. Every necromorph is party of a hive mind directed by the Marker, which is even referred to in Dead Space: Martyr as "The Devil's Tail". They seek to drag everyone down to their level, like demons in the Bible; or from a secular perspective, Evangelists pressing pamphlets and agendas down everyone's throats.

The necromorphs represent everything that pulls away at your faith and beliefs, whatever they are.

They are the devil stirring doubt in your heart and they are the critic making you second-guess yourself. They are the hardships of this world and the constant pains it gives us. They are a concentrated dose of stress, torture, and frustration all in one. Even when we defeat such challenges in real life, just like Isaac, we are left with a little less certainty and standing until we can restore ourselves to our former state.

Similarly, we have to be strategic and smart if we are to defend our beliefs. Isaac cuts off his opponents before they come near, just as we cut off an opposing person's arguments at the source to unsettle their position and strengthen our own. It's a duel of wits and knowing where to hit. Most of the necromorphs even fit descriptions of various sinful and dangerous behaviors, such as gluttony, impatience, dangerous overparenting, rage, and ignorance.

Isaac's journeys even focus on universal religious themes. The first one deals with the unknown, questioning of faith, and the dangers of denial. The second covers guilt, trust, betrayal, and forgiveness both from others and the forgiveness we give ourselves. The finale deals with duty, past regrets, forgiveness again (this time for Carver), faith, and most importantly of all -- the value and purpose of sacrifice. Sacrifice, duty, and past regrets especially stand out in the finale, as every character confronts a situation where they may choose wrong or right in light of the past and what is to come, and that they will very likely die and be forgotten, even though they are all that stands in the way of the end of all human life.

So we have a universe that faces the harshest moments and the brightest spots of religious belief (and lack thereof), set around gameplay that is an allegory to the stresses and pains of regular life with a heroic yet flawed human protagonist who stands as an example to the failures and successes of faith-motivated actions.

Now some may argue I'm making something out of nothing here. I may be doing just that, but what if I am, what's wrong with that? Dead Space is a great series on its own, and adding more depth is in its favor, as far as I'm concerned. Also, we have far too few games that truly let us just be who we are while still feeling some escapism and fun. If anyone else out there feels this way about another game but hasn't said anything, I think they should be able to. I think their years of silent patience has earned them that.

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Dead Space on iOS Not a Deadpan Game https://www.gameskinny.com/oxovs/dead-space-on-ios-not-a-deadpan-game https://www.gameskinny.com/oxovs/dead-space-on-ios-not-a-deadpan-game Fri, 19 Jul 2013 13:01:59 -0400 AliceS

One day, I was just chilling in the App store on my iPod touch, and I saw that Dead Space was free! I've been meaning to play the game for a while now but never got around to it. I don't have a PS3 or Xbox, so all I have is my laptop which can't run games on high graphics. Anyway, I downloaded the game on my iPod and I wasn't really expecting much, but I was really surprised at how well it looked and how smooth the movements were. 

The interface is really fancy and the graphics still surprise me. It even logs in your gameplay time just like on the consoles or PC! Even cooler, you can make up to three profiles. Not bad for an iPhone game, right? 

A sweet add-on is the choice of language. You get to choose from English, French, Deutsch, Italian, Spanish, Chinese, and Korean, so if English isn't your first language, you can still enjoy the game!  

Alright, so after you've gone through all the settings you could possibly adjust and maybe learned some words in another language, it's time to actually play the game! 

The gameplay and controls are not complicated and although it took some getting used to at first, they're fairly simple and accurate. Some iOS games, like the Sonic games, used a mini joystick on the side which wasn't as responsive and made controlling your character a challenge. It was more like getting frustrated that your character wasn't doing what he was supposed to rather than enjoying the game, but not in Dead Space. Here, you just hold your finger on the screen on the left and you walk and slide it upwards a bit to run. To look around, you use your right-hand finger to swipe back and forth. Swipe up or down when the symbols show up to do so while killing Necromorphs. Simple, right? You can even adjust the look sensitivity and invert Y axis in Dead Space, as well as turn subtitles and hints on or off, and did I mention it has auto-reload? Pretty legit. 

Now, here's the really cool part.

There are four different ways to play the game: story mode, by chapter, endless, or five minutes to kill. I'd suggest playing through the story first (you can't play chapters you haven't unlocked yet), but that's just because I like following storylines in games. In this game, it's not necessary, so feel free to just enjoy killing bad guys in five minutes to kill or test your skills in endless (there's no auto health regeneration)! The sound is also spectacular if you play with your headphones in. 

The only complaint I have about this game is that while shooting, there's no auto-lock on and the choice of guns and the amount of ammo you have. It runs out quick and sometimes when you just want to open a door by tapping, you end up shooting a precious bullet. Luckily, if you explore, you'll find ammo fairly frequently. 

I've only played until Chapter 3 so far, but it's definitely a game I'm planning on continuing playing. I've noticed most iOS games tend to lag at times or freeze and crash, but this one doesn't. Good job developers, keep it up! 

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