Final Fantasy V Articles RSS Feed | GameSkinny.com Final Fantasy V RSS Feed on GameSkinny.com https://www.gameskinny.com/ en Launch Media Network 8 Games and Franchises with the Biggest Translation Gaffes https://www.gameskinny.com/3ja5f/8-games-and-franchises-with-the-biggest-translation-gaffes https://www.gameskinny.com/3ja5f/8-games-and-franchises-with-the-biggest-translation-gaffes Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:30:01 -0400 Joshua Broadwell

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Breath of Fire II

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Fans love to hate Capcom. Sometimes, it seems unfair. Other times, like when you remember Breath of Fire II, then it's completely understandable, and you just step back and let things go. Oh, if only the above picture had been true.

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The early BoF games had an interesting history. Squaresoft handled the first one's localization and publishing. It had some problems, sure. The dialogue and mechanics were rough around the edges but there's still enjoyment to be had with it.

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You would think of the BoF games, the first would have all the terrible issues, that Square would have taken the opportunity to sabotage a potential rival creeping in on its RPG monopoly.

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Or perhaps someone at Square could tell that left to its own devices, Capcom would do that quite nicely on its own.

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Breath of Fire II's translation and localization are full of ludicrous descriptions and sound effects and unclear dialogue. It's a showing on par with gems from the '80s like "all your base are belong to us" and Castlevania II.

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It's near Deborah Cliff...

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There are some classic signs of bad, careless translation as well, where the untranslated text is left in alongside the translated script, or even worse, the writer just added a transliteration, which isn't, y'know... actually a translation.

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Manju are Japanese buns, so this particular instance is one of those cases where you forget  where the writer forgets to delete what they chose not to use. Note the transliteration was highlighted as the key point, though.

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Other errors are less in keeping with the context. I'm not sure about you, but I see what could possibly be a boar — no bears, though.

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It's amazing how punctuation can be so significant. Some bizarre uses of periods in here, except where a period is actually needed.

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At first glance, there doesn't appear to be anything wrong with these two. It's just a nice, normal observation from a character who obviously hasn't seen Nina for a while. Except, she isn't seeing Nina now either.

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This isn't a case where the party members all fold into the leader. The girl with the wings near the table? That's Nina. This woman just told Ryu he's not a little girl anymore, and I can only imagine how surprised he must have been to learn that.

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If these things had remained a relic of the '90s BoF II, that would be a different story. But two different re-releases later — first on the Game Boy Advance and then on the Virtual Console — and Capcom still believed this translation was worth keeping.

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Modern games aren't free from the plague of bad translation, sadly, but their shortcomings certainly do provide an amusing way to pass the time. Whether it's Capcom's carelessness in the '90s, Atlus's rushed schedule from a few years back, or the flood of cheap titles inundating digital platforms, it seems like bad translations are simply a universal factor of gaming life.

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Got any examples of terrible game translations? Share yours in the comments!

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Persona 5

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Including Persona 5 on this list might be controversial. However, there's no denying that good though the game undoubtedly is, it falls far short of Atlus's standards in localization and what fans have come to expect from the company. That departure from the high-quality norm is a bigger gaffe than any translation awkwardness in the game.

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Fortunately, for the most part, the game's dialogue quirks don't come anywhere near Kitty Love and Hollow Fragment levels of bad. You do have to pause for a moment and consider what's being said from time to time, though.

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Morgana is pretty quirky to begin with, so at first glance, this seems like just another manifestation of that personality. But the sentence doesn't technically make sense. "seriously trying to kill us" maybe or "serious about killing us," but serious to kill us is what you'd expect from an inexperienced translator or an early ESL student.

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Conner Kramer put together a site listing some notably egregious errors (and getting some flak for it from the fan community as well), and he added some alternatives for a few of them. Here's an example:

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His revision is a lot more like what fans got in Persona 4 and much more in keeping with the character doing the speaking as well. One would expect a high school principle to say something like "misdemeanor is not tolerated..." as opposed to "you will behave yourself," which is better suited to an elementary school setting.

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There are other signs of carelessness too.

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Image via j-entranslations

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Persona games rely heavily on good dialogue to push the story forward and keep players interested. These issues are hardly game breaking, but they do break the immersion, which makes it difficult to remain invested.

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What lies behind the issue is a mystery. It's possible some elements of localization were a rushed job, since the game was delayed to begin with. But it's equally possible it was simply oversight.

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Yu Namba, senior project manager at Atlus and responsible for a good deal of Persona games' localization processes, once said he couldn't account for everything that happened, but tried to make sure the core narrative was coherent and clear. Other things could slip through the cracks, as they apparently did for P5.

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Kitty Love

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The Switch has taken over the Vita's place as supreme host of otome games. The eShop is flooded with romance games, most of which are geared towards female audiences, and many of which have rather low production values.

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Kitty Love takes the crown for one of the worst translations, though. It's the usual quirky premise for one of these games. The protagonist works at a flower shop by day and turns into a cat by night, because why not.

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As is a growing trend with eShop games, the game's end result is less than stellar, with apparently very little in the way of quality control either by the developer or Nintendo's alleged curation process.

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The quintessential tourist activity — buttering the day

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Some of the errors here aren't quite Hollow Fragment bad, but they do range from the mild to the completely unintelligible, up to the "how could you think this was okay?"

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The protagonist is in cat form in the above, so presumably, this is just a special way of saying he held the cat

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Many of the scenarios just take a bit of figuring out to understand.

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That isn't one of them, though.

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Or that one.

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Okay, so maybe it is on par with Hollow Fragment.

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That's...not good.

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Slapdash niche games riddled with errors aren't exactly new, but there are a couple of things that make Kitty Love stand out as particularly noteworthy.

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The first is the fact that it exists at all on the Switch eShop. Nintendo claimed from the eShop's early days that it would be akin to a curated platform, and not every pitch, even from well-known developers, would be accepted. Fast forward two short years, and it seems that policy has quietly been abandoned.

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What's more, unlike some games, including Hollow Fragment, Kitty Love continues to exist in this form — no patches, no changes, no discounts. Whether the amusing dialogue is worth the price of admission is for you to decide.

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Pokemon Crystal: Vietnamese Version

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Pokemon Vietnamese Crystal has been a thing on the internet for many years, and it's practically a meme generator. The game has a strange history. It started as a Chinese translation of the Japanese script, but despite being considered a Vietnamese version, the game is pretty much entirely in English.

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Players are greeted with this.

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They do? I'm...so sorry

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For some reason, the translator was a bit free with referring to Pokemon as Elf and as Monster, depending on the context, though there didn't seem to be much of a guiding reason behind which scenario got which reference. Either way, there's not much of a link between professor or scholar and monster.

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Some of the text is comprehensible, and you can get an idea of how it went from the original meaning to the slightly garbled one.

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Friend makes sense, since Pokemon are often referred to as friend in the script. Store... eh. Center and shop are close, but that's starting to stretch it (especially when everything in there is free).

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And then you get ones like this, from the next script point.

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It's easy to pick up on the fact that "grasp" is used for catch, but basin?

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This early conversation shortly after the rival makes an appearance is unique, but not actually instructive.

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This one doesn't seem to be very clear either, until you realize he's talking about Mr. Pokemon.

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Apart from the phrasing, it makes sense. I don't know what the original script says, but I imagine it's something referring to Mr. Pokemon as an older man, hence "Grandfather."

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But then you get this again.

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And this.

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The battle system is its own set of special. The theory goes that perhaps there was an indexing error that threw descriptions and translations off, since some are correct, just out of place. Other issues involved transliterating Japanese grammatical particles that weren't intended to be spoken or read.

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But it doesn't explain everything about it or the naming conventions.

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It certainly doesn't explain the unique way of obtaining items, where the game throws the F-bomb your way every time you place an item in the bag.

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Most of the game is almost impossible to understand. If you're interested, you can check out the original Let's Play that sparked the phenomenon. 

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Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment

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Sword Art Online is a popular transmedia franchise, spanning manga, anime, and video games. In most cases, SOA in all of its forms tells a compelling story with likeable characters, and it's garnered a decent-sized following in the West. We even ranked Sword Art Online: Hollow Realization as one of 2017's best anime franchise games.

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Its sequel, Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment had a very, very rough start in the West, though. Like a handful of other Japanese games released in Asia before the West, it initially had an Asian release with an English language option.

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But that translation was bad. In fact, bad doesn't even begin to cover it.

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Japan has its share of race problems, but this wasn't an instance of blatant insensitivity. This is just referring to Kirito, the man wearing black. Though, I don't think he was sexually harassing anyone.

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This isn't exactly what you'd expect to find as a subject line in a hero's inbox.  Fear not, though — it's just monster extermination, SAO Asian translation-style.

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The translation was also just plain lazy. SAO games stray into racy territory now and again, but , this isn't a reference to one of those adult visual novel scenes. This is just bad translation of a symbol with a wide variety of meanings, most of which relate to war, exploration, and things like that.

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Fans who played the version that existed prior to the improved translation patch saw lots of references to penetration throughout the game, in some unusual contexts as well.

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Some of the (many) instances do make me wonder whether the translator had a slight idea of what they were saying and tried to just make a joke out of it.

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This wasn't the only instance of single-minded determination to stick to one translation regardless of context either.

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A standard Japanese greeting is yoroshiku, or the full version, yoroshiku onegaishimasu. It can mean a variety of things, from "nice to meet you," to "let's get along" or "let's work together," among other potential definitions.

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It's useful when you first meet someone, of course. But Asuna and other characters  would say this every time Kirito chose them to accompany him on a penetration — er, that is, an exploration trip.

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Same to you!

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There are countless other instances of unclear or ridiculous phrasing as well.

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This being one good example.

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As a matter of fact, there is.

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Bandai Namco isn't known for always making the best decisions, but it's odd how an established company ended up using a very evidently poorly trained translator for the original English version.

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One of my favorite things about being underground is seeing the sky.

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The Tales of... Games

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Bandai Namco's Tales of... series is known for its endearing characters, interesting plots, and snappy dialogue. However, not all entries are created equally.

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The most recent new Tales of game, Tales of Berseria, was lauded for its darker take on the usually chipper stories and characters, but it suffered from some very uneven dialogue and writing towards the end of the game

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Not all the errors are quite as confusing as this one, though.

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But the biggest issue with the numerous gaffes towards the end of the game is that most of them end up completely unintelligible, like these next two.

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Bandit shrooms don't even exist in the game.

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It's worth noting the voiced lines don't always match with the written dialogue, though. This fact leads some to suspect that perhaps what happened with Berseria was a sudden change in script or direction near the end of production that didn't make it to the localization department and was just crammed in at the last minute.

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Errors in Earlier Games
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Either way, these kinds of issues aren't restricted to modern titles. Clyde Mandellin with Legends of Localization noticed this interesting mistake in Tales of the Abyss that's rather easy to overlook.

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In between all the talk of fonons and fomicry in the early part of the game, it's easy to forget that the seventh fonon was known about for a long, long time. After all, how could Tear be a practicing Seventh Fonist if it was only just discovered?

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The error here comes from a loose translation of the original Japanese, which only said it was the most recently discovered, which doesn't give any kind of time reference.

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Then there was the official English translation of Tales of Phantasia, with this interesting little nugget.

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The original line was Ragnarok, but Mandelin says older versions of Microsoft Word didn't include Ragnarok in the dictionary and only offered Kangaroo with a capital K as the first recommended choice. This one was a careless spell check error that somehow managed to make it through to publication.

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Why the editors of a fantasy game script thought spell check could be relied on anyway is another matter.

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Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana

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The Ys series is one of gaming's longest-running series, with Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana being the most recent entry. While its action oriented gameplay and immersive worlds haven't changed dramatically over the decades, its publication status in the West certainly has.

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Most of the early titles after the original two ended up as fan translations, before XSeed began bringing them over as part of its partnership with developer Nihon Falcom (we won't talk about that Konami incident with Ys VI).

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And then came Nippon Ichi Software America. As part of Falcom's attempts to expand its international audience, it gave the publishing license for Ys VIII to NISA, with some initially unforeseen results.

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This character's bowel habits became a running gag in the original translation, which shouldn't be too surprising since NISA also gave us Esty Dee (STD) as a localization joke (as they did in Atelier Rorona: The Alchemist of Arland).

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It's okay Reja; most of us don't either.

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The game was riddled with untranslated text, randomly scattered here and there — a common error in badly handled games from the '90s, but not something one would expect from modern games. It's certainly not in keeping with what fans expected, which made it stand out all the more.

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Lines like this are common as well, making certain narrative segments and even dialogue a sort of guessing game. But that's not the worst thing.

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The game originally had a passable English translation, especially for most main segments and place names. Why NISA  re-translated isn't clear, particularly when the re-translation was as it was.

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Fortunately, NISA publicly recognized its errors and re-re-translated the script, providing a much better experience all 'round and apparently earning Falcom's trust enough to warrant being given its next big overseas project, The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel III

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Final Fantasy Games

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Most Final Fantasy games are high quality, well-produced works. That doesn't mean they are error-free, but for the most part, the base games are well-written with good localization.

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Unfortunately, Square Enix has gained a reputation for not really caring about how those high quality works transfer to other platforms based on their lazy ports and similarly low-effort localizations.

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No, the above isn't a screenshot from an alternate Final Fantasy IV universe where the Red Wings were Baron's premiere delivery service with Cecil as their leader. It's the first line of script in the mobile FFIV port.

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The port was supposed to use the DS version's script, but obviously, something happened along the way. It made its own mistakes, while keeping those of its predecessor.

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And then there's the mobile port of Final Fantasy VI.

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Given how many times "esper" appears in the script, it's baffling how this mistake wasn't caught before the game launched, to say nothing of the awkward phrasing that was left untouched.

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Still, the script is entirely readable, unlike some other inclusions in this list. The biggest issue is that errors like this are expected with most SE ports, causing one to wonder about the overall attitude of the port teams and the company towards its franchises.

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Errors in Original Versions
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However, the original versions are certainly not free from errors.

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Final Fantasy VII fans will already know this screenshot contains two errors The potentially less obvious one is Aeris's name. It's actually meant to be Aerith, and that's how it appears in all later mentions in the Final Fantasy universe.

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This was a common translation error in the 1990s, when localization teams were apparently not experienced in differentiating between easily misunderstood Japanese characters. Most people know about the "L" and "R" confusion, but "S" and "TH" is another one.

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There are, of course, other linguistic challenges to overcome as well.

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That above is a wyvern in Final Fantasy V.

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There's not really any reason other than just "whoops" for this one from Final Fantasy X, though to be fair, it was fixed in the HD remasters.

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Video game fans have been dealing with the highs and lows of translation and localization since the 1980s. It's a risk built into a hobby that often relies on media translated from one context-sensitive language to a very different one.

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Some of the early examples of translation gaffes have made their way into meme-dom and are among the best-known examples of games gone wrong, games such as Top Wing and Ghosts N' Goblins.

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As time progressed, one would think these issues would gradually fade away, with more experienced translators and bigger budgets.

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That, however, didn't happen. Through the 1990s and up to recent years, video games still dealt shoddy translations, rushed schedules, and bad management — even some of the bigger games and studios.

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Some of the more egregious errors in these games and franchises are what this list focuses on, examples of games that should have been better from companies that ought to know better. Along the way, we'll touch on the reasons behind the gaffes and explore what, if anything, was done to remedy the problems.

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Final Fantasy V By Chris Kohler Review -- How Influential A Game Can Be https://www.gameskinny.com/k57o8/final-fantasy-v-by-chris-kohler-review-how-influential-a-game-can-be https://www.gameskinny.com/k57o8/final-fantasy-v-by-chris-kohler-review-how-influential-a-game-can-be Thu, 19 Oct 2017 17:11:05 -0400 Erroll Maas

Final Fantasy is one of the most recognizable franchises in video game history. Ever since the first -- and at the time thought to be the only -- entry in the series, a plethora of Final Fantasy games have mystified players around the world for several decades. Perhaps one of the entries with the most compelling history is Final Fantasy V.

Chris Kohler, Features Editor at Kotaku, has written extensively on the subject -- and in his new book on the game, he closely examines the development and localization of Final Fantasy V, and the legacy it has created.

How FFV Brought New Features to the Table

Final Fantasy V was the first game in the series to have a more cinematic introduction, so the credits felt similar to watching a movie and instilled the player with the sense that they were about to go on an incredible journey. In his book, Kohler goes into even more detail about how the director and writers had to work with the programmers to make sure important scenes came alive in the best way possible so they were more impactful. Through the use of various interviews with the developers, Kohler craftily explores the way the story of the game was conceived.

Kohler also discusses how some of the gameplay of Final Fantasy V was heavily influenced by both Final Fantasy III and Dragon Quest III. Both of these games allowed players to switch character classes whenever they wanted, and Final Fantasy V built upon this element. It took this mechanic a step further by allowing abilities to be carried over when switching characters from one class to another, putting more freedom and more interesting combinations at the player's disposal. The additional information Kohler provides about the best class combinations and most useful skills offers helpful insight for any intrigued player.

Final Fantasy V Becomes a Best Seller in Japan

Although a more brief section in the book, Kohler talks about how Final Fantasy V became a top seller and the best-selling game in the series at the time shortly after its release in Japan. Kohler then continues to talk about the competition between Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy and how one series always seems to have an edge over the other depending on the region. Despite its brevity, this section helps illustrate how different the significance and popularity of a game can be throughout separate parts of the world.

Dedicated Fans Can Make All the Difference

Kohler himself was heavily involved in the story of how Final Fantasy V first reached North American fans. He takes us through how the original Super Nintendo version of Final Fantasy V never had an official release outside of Japan, how he and plenty of other Final Fantasy players modified their systems to play the Japanese version of the game -- despite lacking of basic understanding of the language --- how it led to the creation of an (international) online guide, and even an unofficial fan translation of the game still considered by many to be the best version. The story is an inspiring read for anyone seeking a career in video games,  showing how admirable achievements can be accomplished through enough dedication and effort.

A Monumental Legacy

Through plenty of later Final Fantasy games, to crossover games such as World of Final Fantasy and Dissiddia NT, the impact Final Fantasy V had on the series itself is clear. But the game's impact goes far beyond just the Final Fantasy series.

While previous games helped future JRPG creators get their start, Final Fantasy V was the first game people like Tetsuya Takahashi (the creator of Xenoblade) and Tetsuya Nomura (creator of the Kingdom Hearts video game series and The World Ends With You) really had a hand in creating. The impact of Final Fantasy V goes even further than leading to the creation of later JRPGs, as many of the people who imported and/or helped create the fan translation of Final Fantasy V (including the author) now work with video games in some way.

But the legacy of Final Fantasy V doesn't stop there. An annual charity event has also been created around Final Fantasy V known as the Final Fantasy V Four Job Fiesta, where four jobs are randomly selected for a player who then must complete the game using only those jobs. Kohler goes into detail about the event's creation, the different four job combinations, useful skills, and the benefits and drawbacks of having four characters with the same job, further encouraging curious players to try it out for themselves.

Final Fantasy V may not be as beloved in other countries as it is in Japan, but the development of the game and the overall impact it has had on video games is fascinating. Whether you're a fan of Final Fantasy,  are seeking a career in video games , or just like reading about video game development in general, then this book is highly recommended.

Final Fantasy V by Chris Kohler is available on Amazon and Boss Fight Books.

A digital eBook copy was provided by Boss Fight Books.

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Lazy porting mars the Final Fantasy VI experience on PC https://www.gameskinny.com/zaenh/lazy-porting-mars-the-final-fantasy-vi-experience-on-pc https://www.gameskinny.com/zaenh/lazy-porting-mars-the-final-fantasy-vi-experience-on-pc Thu, 17 Dec 2015 09:30:24 -0500 Ty Arthur

Despite dominating on consoles, the Final Fantasy series generally has a poor track record when it comes to the PC. The MMORPG entry Final Fantasy XIV had such a negative reaction from fans that it was pulled entirely and rebuilt as A Realm Reborn, while the single player console games typically also suffer from problems when they make the jump to PC.

The double DRM (both Steam and online activation through the Square Enix servers) on Final Fantasy VII definitely doesn't sit well with fans, but now we've got a whole new issue to deal with: ports of ports that lead to sub-par experiences for high prices.

Making Different Editions Distinct

Back when we covered the Final Fantasy series from best to worst, it was mentioned how difficult it can be to rank a long-running series that contains such a huge number of re-releases, re-packages, ports, and now re-makes. The original Final Fantasy for instance has seen more than 10 distinct releases on various platforms.

Some of those updated entries clearly had work put into them though: when the classic Final Fantasy IV came to the Nintendo DS, it actually got a major overhaul. For good or ill, the 2D sprites were entirely re-imagined in 3D model format, the translation errors were fixed, new mini-games and cut scenes were added, but the basic gameplay remained essentially the same.

Not everyone digs the 3D style, but at least IV tried something different

From there this version of FFIV went to iOS / Android devices, and then something baffling happened: the mobile edition was ported to PC, essentially as-is. There are places where it's clear the graphics were designed for a smaller screen and that a touchpad was supposed to be used. Despite that odd decision to not make any significant changes for the PC version, at the very least Steam users got to experience the game in a different way than the original SNES edition by virtue of the 3D graphics and other extras.

Going In The Wrong Direction

Unfortunately, there's no such luck for the next two games in the series as the porting issue gets worse from there. FFV and FFVI both got mobile versions, but with minimal changes. Rather than a complete overhaul, the sprites were instead updated to be more “hi-res” and there were some character portraits thrown in during dialog sequences.

These mobile editions have now been ported, again as-is, to the PC through Steam, and the experience is a less than satisfying one. Frankly, the whole thing feels pretty lazy. In the grand scheme of things though, the Steam asking price isn't all that much, and Final Fantasy 6 is an absolutely amazing game in terms of story and music, so what's my beef with this new edition?

Sad but true analysis of the graphical evolution

For starters, it seems odd to pay $16 for a direct mobile port of a 20 year old game with only slightly modified graphics and no significant new content (especially considering how the originals are freely up for grabs for anyone who knows about emulators). Note that I wrote “modified” and not “improved” about the graphics. Sure, the character sprites are no longer pixelated and lo-res, but they don't actually look better.

In fact the odd juxtaposition of styles looks worse than the original SNES version, as there's no cohesiveness between the characters, backgrounds, and monsters. There's some serious problems on the character portraits, as they frequently don't match the sprites – at all. The games also don't look good in full screen mode no matter what resolution are you using, as its again clear these sprites were made for a phone and not a 20” or larger monitor.

Portrait says "woman in a dress" while sprite says "man with brown hair"

Pricing Ports Of Old Games On PC

With these new ports of FFV and FFVI you are literally getting a mobile game, but with the added “benefit” of having to be at your computer to play it. The most that can be said about the Steam edition is that you get achievements and Steam cards, so that's at least something, but if you don't care about achievements then there's really no drive to grab these games on PC.

Considering the fully 3D FFVII and FFVIII are on Steam for only $12, this pricing of older, smaller, less graphically advanced games seems higher than it really should be. Then again, the lack of micro-transactions on these mobile games means you are actually only paying $16, and not 99 cents plus $25 in nickel and diming over the course of the game.

The smudged sprites somehow look worse than the old pixelated versions

Putting Some Effort Into New Versions

For these PC ports to get any recognition and love, Square Enix has an issue to overcome here that's made difficult by the fickleness of a devoted fanbase: we want changes, but not that many. Sadly, they really can't win either way. Give us the exact same thing and we'll complain about it, or make a major change (like the combat system in the upcoming FFVII remake) and we'll complain about it even harder.

The problem is that with this latest batch of ports, there wasn't any effort made at all. How difficult would it be to efficiently optimize the experience for PC and throw in some additions to take advantage of better hardware? Take the PS4 port of FFVII for instance – while the game remains very close to the original, there were at least a couple of new features added in, like the ability to skip random encounters or increase the game to 3X speed. There really should have been more, but that was at least an attempt at new features.

The still unreleased Final Fantasy XV has been in development for 10 years (!!) now, so there's no argument to be made that Square Enix doesn't have the time or resources to devote to these projects and make the PC editions worth playing. As someone who completely plays FFVI from beginning to end at least once a year, I'd rather wait longer and see a new version worthy of the original come out than get a lazy port with some Steam achievements slapped on.

Please, please be worth the wait!

It's hard not to see these bare-minimum effort ports as a cynical money grab. You already bought the game on the SNES, then you bought it again on the PS1 for the nostalgia, then you bought it again on a mobile device for the casual diversion, and now you can have literally the same thing on the PC. Throw in the upcoming remakes with modern graphics and this situation has reached an absurd level.

Yeah, Square Enix having more money means they'll keep making new games (with potential decade-long development cycles...), but at some point this whole system just gets ridiculous, especially when the newer versions become increasingly lazy. Square Enix owes it to the fans to give us something better than what's been coming down the pipe lately.

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A look at the Final Fantasy series from best to worst https://www.gameskinny.com/8ut51/a-look-at-the-final-fantasy-series-from-best-to-worst https://www.gameskinny.com/8ut51/a-look-at-the-final-fantasy-series-from-best-to-worst Tue, 24 Nov 2015 06:42:03 -0500 Ty Arthur

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Final Fantasy XV is now on the horizon, and the highly anticipated remake of FF7 is coming as well, so there's no shortage of major releases arriving soon for RPG lovers.

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If the huge number of releases up till this point are any indication, we probably have many, many more spin-offs and numbered titles still on the horizon as Square Enix experiments with the formula and heads in new directions.

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What did you think of our picks, and what order would you have placed the best to worst ranking of Final Fantasy games?

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Worst: Final Fantasy 13

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You know how everyone feels about Final Fantasy 12? That's how I feel about part 13. Seriously, this abomination needs to be nuked from orbit and then some men in black need to show up and wipe the disappointment of FF13 from our memories. This is the only game in the series I've actually put down in disgust and never had any desire to pick back up again. That's 10 hours I'll never get back.

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The first entry for the PS3 / Xbox 360 era may have enhanced visuals, but absolutely everything else was a tragic misstep. The absolute bottom of the Final Fantasy barrel, XIII made the tragic mistake of losing composer Nobuo Uematsu and then gave the double whammy of actively annoying characters (Vanille is the worst thing to ever happen to gaming) and a truly uninteresting combat system.

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No matter how badly FF15 gets nerfed, I take solace in knowing it can't be as bad as this entry in the series.

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Final Fantasy Mystic Quest

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Mystic Quest is one of the very few Final Fantasy games to never get a remake or re-release, and unfortunately there's a reason for that. The combat system switched to a different view more along the lines of Phantasy Star, and the story and characters were incredibly weak, mostly existing as vehicles for a never-ending string of monotonous battles.

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Trudging through the constant onslaught of repetition becomes a serious chore that makes Mystic Quest hard to play for extended periods. Despite all that, I have to admit I still I have a soft spot in my heart for this red-headed stepchild of the FF series, mostly because of the many hours I put into it as a young 'un. And on the plus side, it's not Final Fantasy 13.

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Final Fantasy 2

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Not many games open with your party getting utterly annihilated, so FF2 has that unique start going for it. Everywhere else it remains as difficult to get into as the first game in the series, but without the nostalgia factor since it didn't hit the U.S. until decades after its Japanese launch.

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Final Fantasy 2 definitely has the most odd skill and leveling system for the series, improving your stats as you use them in battle or as you are hit by enemy attacks rather than as you gain experience points.

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Even for its age, the game design wasn't the greatest, as you could literally walk into an area where you'd die immediately in every battle without any warning or prompting to stay away until reaching a higher level.

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Final Fantasy 3

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Playing the original NES/Famicon versions of the first three games in the Final Fantasy franchise, the visual style is incredibly similar with only minor graphical tweaks. The major differences were instead in the leveling and class systems.

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Final Fantasy 3 is where many of the iconic elements of the series that appear in every game originated, but, unfortunately, they were only gestating here and not fully developed. Lacking the nostalgia of the original or the more polished style of the SNES games to come, FF3 exists mostly as a curiosity to be explored to see how far the series has come.

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For those who can't handle the simple graphics and clunky controls, updated 3D versions with gameplay tweaks came to the Nintendo DS, the PSP, and the PC.

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Final Fantasy 10

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As a kid who grew up on the excellent storytelling and very different art style of the SNES and PS1 days, I never developed the same emotional connection to the PS2 games the next generation of RPG lovers has, so frankly I'm not a big fan of this entry.

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Swapping out characters directly in battle was neat and some of the characters had their moments, but overall this is one of the weaker entries in Final Fantasy history on most other fronts.

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Adding underwater football also really didn't do anything for me, as I found myself wondering why I was learning Blitzball plays instead of battling monsters or saving the world...

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Final Fantasy 5

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While graphically pleasing (for the early SNES days anyway) and fleshing out the class system that would become very famous later on, there's actually a lot wrong with this game.

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Taking place in a variety of worlds that only had a few quests each meant that huge areas were pointless, and it's easy to get lost without figuring out just where you are supposed to go. The game also gets fairly repetitive after a few hours, and it's worth mentioning that in the North American version your main character's name is, oddly, “Butz.”

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Nobody in North America played it (legitimately anyway) for a long time due to the lack of an official release until much later on, so FF5 really missed its window to shine. Of course, everybody in the know had downloaded an English translation ROM way before Squaresoft figured out people actually wanted to play this game and gave it a proper stateside release.

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Final Fantasy 8

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Although the graphics improved and many new elements were added in, the characters just weren't as likable nor the story as engaging as Final Fantasy 8's groundbreaking predecessor. Adding in a card game was an interesting twist for a time when kids were still trading Pokemon cards at recess, providing an extra level of depth for those who spent the time learning its mechanics.

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Some of the changes were hit or miss, as the game didn't just completely change the magic system, it even changed the menu system. Letting you swap out which three abilities you wanted was cool in theory, but it was annoying to decide whether you wanted magic or items for the next few battles.

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The characters were sometimes amusing and charming... and sometimes just flat out annoying. I'm still split on which side of that divide Laguna lands when he gets a leg cramp while trying to muster the courage to chat up a sexy singer and then somehow gets her back to his hotel room but doesn't make a move.

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Final Fantasy

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This is where it all started, and whoever would have guessed the absolutely massive industry it spawned? Going back and playing it today there's a huge D&D influence to the first game (especially in the magic system) that many probably missed back then.

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Needless to say, this is a very bare bones game where the formula hadn't been refined yet. Some of the classes were completely pointless, and the combat system was in need of serious polish (you could actually attack an empty space if another attack took down an enemy), but there's a nostalgia to be had here, especially in that distinctly '80s fantasy box art.

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The witch Matoya's backwards talking broomsticks are also a little gem of gaming history that have been referenced in all kinds of media since those heady early days of console role-playing games.

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Final Fantasy 4

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Released as Final Fantasy 2 originally in North America, this is another game in the franchise that's completely iconic and remembered fondly but actually has a ton of flaws.

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While I probably played this game a couple of dozen times as a kid, returning to it as an adult will cause more than a few cringes. Despite the memorable characters and fun gameplay, much of the dialog and plotting is flat-out bad (who can forget such heart felt insults as “You spoony bard?”). But hey, you get to fly a space whale to the moon!

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This was also one of the earlier games to feature major character deaths that really stuck with you, as well as villains that you won't soon forget. The music from that battle against the dancing calcobrena dolls thoroughly creeped me out as a kid, and I can still hum it to this day.

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If you want to return to the kingdom of Baron and see what happened with Rose and Cecil's kids, there was a direct sequel for the Wii (in the exact same original art style) released in episodic format, with each segment revolving around a different character.

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Final Fantasy 12

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This one may be a bit controversial ranking above others, as plenty of Final Fantasy fans straight up despise this game and would like to see it stricken from the franchise's history. Those fans are also wrong.

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I'll grant you Vaan is somewhere between annoying and forgettable, and all the characters do oddly look too similar, but that's about where the criticisms end.

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Gameplay-wise, FF12 is very solid and offered a satisfying experience capping the PS2 era as the consoles were about to change over. The map-based skill system was interesting to learn and play around with, while the completely redesigned combat was a fun change of pace, and unlocking all the monster entries offered a reason to keep playing previous areas.

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Final Fantasy 7

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Age hasn't been kind to the most famous game in all Final Fantasy history, but it still remains a strong contender for the top spots, even if there's a whole lot of nostalgia influencing that positioning. Props also have to be given where they are due for introducing RPGs to a much wider western audience.

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On the positive sides, who could forget cross dressing for a mob boss, chocobo racing, snowboarding at Gold Saucer, the absurdly long Knights Of The Round summon, or the excellent materia system?

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On the downsides, the graphics are straight up ugly at this point, and the story was often bizarre and sometimes incomprehensible (it took me more than one playthrough as a kid to figure out just what the heck Cloud actually was and what his relationship to Zack was supposed to be).

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Final Fantasy 9

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Capping off the golden era of PS1 releases, FF9 returned to actual fantasy territory after two games that strongly blended sci-fi and modern day elements into the mix.

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Although there was lots of comic relief (particularly with the knight character Steiner), there's some gut-punching stuff in this story. Vivi's storyline is both thought-provoking and heart-wrenching, even when it's filled with adorable little guys in overly large hats.

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Final Fantasy 9 is also notable for working summoned monsters into the actual main storyline, rather than just being these beings of massive power you casually pull out for any given random battle and then send away a few minutes later.

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Final Fantasy Tactics

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The only game to truly compete with Final Fantasy 6, this turn-based strategy take on traditional Final Fantasy lore is another one where the music and sound effects are major highlights. For a game featuring a more serious and dark tone than the rest of the entries in the series, the music really ramps up the tension and perfectly matches the art direction.

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While the job-based class system and grid combat system are excellent, it's the story and characters that shine most brightly. It's a complex story but one that's still easily accessible, and it was a little daring for the time it was released in (when games were still considered “for kids”) with its openly anti-religious themes.

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That bleak ending is perfect for the story being told as Ramza – who saved the world – gets branded a traitor and forgotten by history, while Delita – who is actually the villain – becomes king.

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Best: Final Fantasy 6

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RPGs not only cut their teeth but really hit their stride on the SNES, with the cream of the crop on that beloved system easily Chrono Trigger... and Final Fantasy 6. Originally released as Final Fantasy 3 in North America, there's a whole era of kids who first experienced this legendary game under that title before RPGs were even close to mainstream. We may have been the nerd crowd, but we had something awesome no one else had caught onto yet.

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Fast forward from 1994, and Final Fantasy 6 still stacks up today as a game worth playing that frankly beats out a lot of modern titles in terms of characters, story, music, and yes, even art style. To be honest, I don't think Squaresoft/Square Enix has ever released anything better on any of those fronts to this day. The quality of the soundtrack can't be overstated, as this is some of the best music Nobuo Uematsu has ever crafted.

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That opera house scene is one of the best in gaming that still makes people tear up today, and that's just the tip of the iceberg. The multi-part battle while defending Narshe, switching between three groups of characters separated across the continent, stealing mechs in the imperial camp, the ghost train, and the world getting completely and utterly destroyed half way through the game are all classic moments in gaming.

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Every playable character had an interesting backstory as well as a unique combat ability that made them all play differently, but let's not discount the bad guys. Has there ever been an antagonist like Kefka? Turns out the insane clown was way more evil than the evil emperor he worked for, and he succeeded where every other villain failed in a quest to destroy the world and rule the ashes.

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Without question, Final Fantasy is easily the most famous and prolific console RPG series of all time, introducing several generations of gamers to the concept of turn-based side by side battles as heroes attempt to overthrow kingdoms and protect magic crystals.

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The coming next-gen remake of Final Fantasy 7 was one of the biggest pieces of news to land from E3 this year, but it's not all we have to look forward to, with the anticipated part 15 arriving next year and slated to shake up the formula quite a bit.

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Ranking these games from best to worst is a monumental task, especially considering the sheer number of titles released since the first Final Fantasy way back 1987. To keep things manageable, here I'm focusing on base single player games in the main series, with two spin-offs included solely because of their iconic nature. The mobile phone games, spin-offs, sequels, MMORPGs, and Legend / Adventure titles on the Game Boy are all being left off this time around.

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Even by culling all those extra games and whittling it down to the 14 titles included here, ranking them is harder than you'd think, as most of the Final Fantasy games have been re-released in alternate versions, some with major graphical and gameplay changes. The first game alone has come out in no less than 11 separate releases from the NES to the PlayStation to mobile phones and most recently for the 3DS.

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For consistency's sake, these are all being ranked based on their original versions and not on the later re-creations.

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Final Fantasy classics come to Amazon Fire TV https://www.gameskinny.com/mbjon/final-fantasy-classics-come-to-amazon-fire-tv https://www.gameskinny.com/mbjon/final-fantasy-classics-come-to-amazon-fire-tv Wed, 28 Oct 2015 10:01:15 -0400 Thewritevictor

Final Fantasy classics III, IV, V, and VI, are all now available for streaming from Amazon's newest device, Amazon Fire TV

All four games have been gloriously improved for Amazon Fire TV's release. Final Fantasy III brings new 3D sequences and updated designs while Final Fantasy VI's graphics were all painstakingly recreated by one of the original graphic designers, Kazuko Shibuya himself.

Final Fantasy 3

Final Fantasy 6

In celebration of the release, Square Enix is offering a sale of 50% off the titles starting October 29 and lasting until November 26. Players can download the four updated games via the Amazon Appstore for immediate gameplay gratification. 

Meanwhile, Amazon Fire TV is still pushing strong into the world of gaming. The Final Fantasy titles join over 800 other games available through the streaming network, including Knights of the Old Republic and Shovel Knight. 

So far Amazon Fire TV Gaming hosts mostly mobile games and apps that are played through their game controller and the Fire TV stick, but reviews have been less than enthusiastic since the device's launch.

"If I could give this zero stars I would. As everyone else has said..." - Michele's review of Fire TV Controller

With compatibility issues and a serious lack of communication from Amazon, many buyers have seen only headaches as they try Fire TV Gaming. Players, for now, seem to be sticking with the consoles they know and love instead of jumping for the new streaming device.

Will the new additions of Final Fantasy classics be enough to gain the praise of players throughout the gaming community? Tell us what you think of Amazon's new adventure into gaming in the comments below!

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Final Fantasy V hits Steam on September 24th https://www.gameskinny.com/qdzbg/final-fantasy-v-hits-steam-on-september-24th https://www.gameskinny.com/qdzbg/final-fantasy-v-hits-steam-on-september-24th Mon, 14 Sep 2015 07:51:41 -0400 Courtney Gamache

Earlier this week Square Enix finally announced a new Final Fantasy addition to Steam. Final Fantasy V is hitting the PC gaming platform later this month on September 24th.

Final Fantasy V is one of the many Final Fantasy games that are now available on Steam, counting nine in total with the new addition. Below is a list of all the Final Fantasy games that are available, some with enhanced controls and graphics. 

It was also announced at E3 2015 that Square Enix was remaking Final Fantasy VII, which originally premiered on the PlayStation in 1997. With updated controls and a revamped battle system, Final Fantasy VII will be brought into the twenty-first century.

Pre-purchasing on Steam

Until Final Fantasy V officially launches on September 24th. The game is available for pre-purchase on Steam for a 10% discount. taking its normal $16 price tag and slashing it to $14.39. 

Are you planning on purchasing the new game on Steam? Do you expect more to hit the Steam platform in upcoming years? Share your thoughts below!

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Final Fantasy Discount Celebrates Android TV compatibility until August 13th https://www.gameskinny.com/rb902/final-fantasy-discount-celebrates-android-tv-compatibility-until-august-13th https://www.gameskinny.com/rb902/final-fantasy-discount-celebrates-android-tv-compatibility-until-august-13th Fri, 07 Aug 2015 20:16:26 -0400 Steven Troya

Square Enix has announced that Final Fantasy III to VI will receive an update for compatibility on Android TV. To celebrate, Final Fantasy III to VI will be getting discounts on the Play Store until August 13th.

Final Fantasy III to VI will be reduced from $15.99 to $7.99 and you better move fast since the offer will only last for a few days.

While the games are at discounted price, your chance to get into the Final Fantasy series (if you aren’t already) has come. Final Fantasy has been around since 1987 and many fans will definitely recommend this batch of games.

In Final Fantasy III, four adventurers together as one of those adventurers, Luneth leaves the village of Ur to find three other comrades in order to save the world from the chaos that the Gulgan prophesized.

Final Fantasy IV gives you the role of Cecil, a knight stripped of his command. Chaos is starting to ensue in the world as creatures of darkness begin to roam the lands and the king begins to seek the Crystals. Figure out why in this gorgeous game!

In Final Fantasy V, the Crystals of water, fire, earth, and wind have suddenly lost their power and are now on the verge of destruction and by extension, the very world itself! Join Bartz and co. on their epic adventure.

Finally (ha!), Final Fantasy VI is set in a world devoid of all magic—all for one girl who posses the lost power. Meeting Locke, a young man, they attempt to escape the evil Empire, which has kept Terra, the only girl with magic, enslaved for many years. This one event sets of a chain of events that will eventually lead to one inevitable conclusion.

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"Top 5" - The best franchises that have made it to 5 games https://www.gameskinny.com/zbsv3/top-5-the-best-franchises-that-have-made-it-to-5-games https://www.gameskinny.com/zbsv3/top-5-the-best-franchises-that-have-made-it-to-5-games Thu, 18 Jun 2015 12:20:35 -0400 Dani Gosha

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Don't worry, this isn't a full list of games that have made it to the Top 5, just some of the most notable. So with that said, share down in the comments some of your all time favourite games that have gone on to 5 games or more. 

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/0/a/5/0a5a651bd9f8797f3e719efd3c35a304.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/0/a/5/tiny_0a5a651bd9f8797f3e719efd3c35a304.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70909","description":"

Dead or Alive 5

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Developer: Team Ninja
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Publisher: Koei Tecmo
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Platforms: PS3 and Xbox 360
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The franchise title may be Dead or Alive but the game is certainly alive, even if DoA 5 is technically the last numbered title. However, there have been several spin-offs since the 2011 release including a love of the number five with DoA 5 Last Round, DoA 5 Ultimate, and DoA 5 Plus

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/b/f/5/bf5ad7ce1a4c6b2b0392c5397a798674.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/b/f/5/tiny_bf5ad7ce1a4c6b2b0392c5397a798674.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70884","description":"

Assassin's Creed III

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Developer: Ubisoft Montreal
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Publisher: Ubisoft
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Platform: PS3, Xbox 360, Wii U and Microsoft Windows
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Despite the III in the Assassin's Creed name, this is actually the fifth game put out for AC. Not every game sequel has a number and this proves it. The AC franchise is currently on their eighth game Assassin's Creed Syndicate, which is set to release October 23 of this year. 

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/b/1/9/b194e8ea434d2804091b21eba19613d0.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/b/1/9/tiny_b194e8ea434d2804091b21eba19613d0.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70907","description":"

Mortal Kombat 5

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Developer: Midway Games
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Publisher: Midway Games
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Platforms: Game Cube, PS2, Xbox, Game Boy Advance
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Mortal Kombat is another game, just like Final Fantasy that I just couldn't leave out on this list. Deadly Alliance is a follow up to Mortal Kombat 4 as we see Quan Chi and Shang Tsung attempt to revive an ancient army in order to take over Outworld and Earthrealm. While the takeover may not have worked out for them, the progressive and a bit of controversial gameplay offered by Mortal Kombat was enough to get it through a fifth game all the way to the recent tenth installment. 

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/c/2/c/c2cfcd308fa32e658e84bff0503379dd.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/c/2/c/tiny_c2cfcd308fa32e658e84bff0503379dd.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70879","description":"

Street Fighter V

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Developer: Capcom
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Publisher: Capcom
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Platforms: Microsoft Windows and PS4
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From Namco to Capcom, arcade games have such old school roots and large followings that there is almost no way you couldn't make at least five games. Street Fighter is no exception to this rule and, as a Street Fighter fan, I'm more than happy. The game is set to release early next year. 

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/0/8/d/08df7d9b51898d2b1f28be869d3dea23.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/0/8/d/tiny_08df7d9b51898d2b1f28be869d3dea23.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70878","description":"

Tekken 5

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Developer: Namco
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Publisher: Namco
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Platforms: Arcade, PS2
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If you're a fan of Arcade Style fighting games, then surely you are happy to see such games like Tekken come a long way. Tekken 5 isn't just the fifth installment but marks the ten year anniversary of the Tekken franchise. The game staying true to its roots, was originally released in 2004 for the arcades before debuting on PS2 in 2005. 

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/b/5/3/b53c1300381a7f61acd42646bf12de05.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/b/5/3/tiny_b53c1300381a7f61acd42646bf12de05.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70877","description":"

Mega Man X 5

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Developer: Capcom Poroduction Studio 3
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Publisher: Capcom
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Platforms: Playstation, PC
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Before there was Mega Man X there was Mega Man and unsurprisingly, both titles have reached their fifth game and then some. Interestingly enough, Mega Man X was meant to be the final game in the saga but on second consideration the game went on to be continued through several other titles. 

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/f/9/d/f9d69ae5604b8e2f53ca92a470ce72a4.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/f/9/d/tiny_f9d69ae5604b8e2f53ca92a470ce72a4.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70876","description":"

Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: ConViction

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Developer: Ubisoft Montreal, Gameloft
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Publisher: Ubisoft
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Platform: Xbox 360, Microsoft Windows, iOS, Cloud, Android, Mac OS X, Bada and Windows Phone
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Conviction is Splinter Cell's fifth game that was released in 2010. While the game did get some negative reviews thanks to monotonous gameplay and being short in length, it didn't stop the franchise from being able to launch a sixth game in 2013 under the Splinter Cell title. 

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"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/f/d/0/fd06d8d7fecdb0ec1cca7a6dafffa19e.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/f/d/0/tiny_fd06d8d7fecdb0ec1cca7a6dafffa19e.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70873","description":"

Final Fantasy V

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Developer: Square
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Publisher: Square
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Platforms: Super Famicom, Playstation, Game Boy Advance, iOS, Android
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If you were waiting to see Final Fantasy V on this list, then wait no more. There's absolutely no way I could make a list about games reaching no. 5 let alone surpassing it and not talk about Final Fantasy. The franchise is borderline unstoppable as it is currently on it's fifteenth installment. Not to mention the recent E3 announcement of a Final Fantasy VII reboot. 

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Yes, this franchise, no matter how long winded, is alive and well. 

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/8/5/f/85f9e47d1e50535dff336102234d6459.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/8/5/f/tiny_85f9e47d1e50535dff336102234d6459.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70861","description":"

Grand Theft Auto V

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Developer: Rockstar North
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Publisher: Rockstar Games
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Platforms: PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One and Microsoft Windows
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When it comes to Grand Theft Auto, the franchise is without a doubt one of the best. While it may be controversial, it is a beloved title and GTA V has made GTA fans love it even more. Larger than life characters and a brand new city, GTA V has it all and we can't wait to see what the eventual GTA VI will have in store. 

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"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/9/7/1/9716a7cf4b300d54aeb965074700b11e.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/9/7/1/tiny_9716a7cf4b300d54aeb965074700b11e.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70860","description":"

Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain

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Developer: Kojima Productions
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Publisher: Konami
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Platforms: PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One and Microsoft Windows
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Two Metal Gear Solid Vs? Yep.

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While we won't get Silent Hills, we will still at least get Kojima's Metal Gear Solid V, so fans can rejoice. The game serves as a sequel to Metal Gear Solid V: Ground ZeroesThe game is set to release early September. 

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/6/8/0/680f2ffa0e61b504d9eb3f3f266ec878.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/6/8/0/tiny_680f2ffa0e61b504d9eb3f3f266ec878.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70886","description":"

Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain

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Developer: Kojima Productions
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Publisher: Konami
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Platforms: PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One and Microsoft Windows
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Metal Gear Solid V continues where Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker left off in the sub-series of prequels within the Metal Gear Solid franchise. The game was originally planned to be one full-length playable experience but was eventually broken up into two parts due to extended development time and Kojima wanting to get the game out to fans as soon as possible. 

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/d/b/2/db268f07e95b3dd1ec985cf9c5573399.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/d/b/2/tiny_db268f07e95b3dd1ec985cf9c5573399.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70859","description":"

Call of Duty: World at War

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Developer: Treyarch, Exakt Entertainment, Arkane Studios
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Publisher: Activision 
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Platforms: Xbox 360, PS3, PS2, Wii, Nintendo DS, Windows Mobile and Microsoft Windows
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World at War is a 2008 follow-up to Call of Duty 4, making it the franchise's fifth game. While it is the fifth game, there isn't much different from CoD4 as it is simply a more enhanced version with increased audio and visual effects.  

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/6/c/4/6c4521bc92315c9f38a2b5ae00649b2c.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/6/c/4/tiny_6c4521bc92315c9f38a2b5ae00649b2c.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70857","description":"

Halo 5: Guardians

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Developers: 343 Industries
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Publisher: Microsoft Studios
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Platforms: Xbox One
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After the first ever Halo, many people knew the game was going to be a success if it chose to continue and many gamers are happy they did. The game is now on its fifth installment and is set to release in October of this year as an Xbox One exclusive. 

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/5/f/c/5fc9e3c09cd751ccf408b4f83b81ed2f.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/5/f/c/tiny_5fc9e3c09cd751ccf408b4f83b81ed2f.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70852","description":"

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim 

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Developer: Bethesda Game Studios
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Publisher: Bethesda Softworks
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Platforms: Xbox 360, PS3 and Microsoft Windows
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Out of all the Elder Scrolls games, Skyrim is one of the most popular and for many reasons including its majestic open world and the accompanying DLC. While Elder Scrolls Online may have been somewhat of a debacle, it isn't enough to keep this growing franchise down. 

"},{"image":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/0/c/3/0c3e3b157c911e75631282f2a8475329.jpg","thumb":"http://s3.amazonaws.com/gameskinnyop/0/c/3/tiny_0c3e3b157c911e75631282f2a8475329.jpg","type":"slide","id":"70874","description":"

Don't let the title fool you, this isn't a Top 5, or at least not your usual Top 5. This is something of a best of the best. When you make a list, without a doubt whether it is about a person or thing, everyone wants to make Top 5. It is just the nature of the beast and video games are no different. 

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Some games are all about one good game, while others aim for a triple threat take over in the form of a gaming trilogy. But then there are games that want to transcend all of that. 

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For the purpose of this article. it is all about the number 5 and even the numbers that have come after. 

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Keep reading for a list of some of the most noteworthy franchises so strong they've made it to their fifth installment and then some. 

"}]]]>
Retro RPGs in Final Fantasy, Dragon Quest Series Discounted on Mobile Devices https://www.gameskinny.com/ijs6z/retro-rpgs-in-final-fantasy-dragon-quest-series-discounted-on-mobile-devices https://www.gameskinny.com/ijs6z/retro-rpgs-in-final-fantasy-dragon-quest-series-discounted-on-mobile-devices Sat, 20 Dec 2014 15:03:33 -0500 Brian Spaen

Need an classic RPG fix for the holidays? If you have an Android or iOS phone or tablet handy, you can get multiple Square Enix games at heavily discounted prices.

Normally, the later Final Fantasy titles are available for $15.99, but all the titles will be discounted until January 5th. Highlights include Final Fantasy IV and VI for just $7.99, Dragon Quest VIII for $12.99, and Chrono Trigger for $4.99.

Here are all the deals for select Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest games on Google Play and iTunes.

  • Final Fantasy - $3.99 (50 percent off)
  • Final Fantasy III - $7.99 (50 percent off)
  • Final Fantasy IV - $7.99 (50 percent off)
  • Final Fantasy IV: The After Years - $7.99 (50 percent off)
  • Final Fantasy V - $7.99 (50 percent off)
  • Final Fantasy VI - $7.99 (50 percent off)
  • Dragon Quest II - $2.99 (40 percent off)
  • Dragon Quest VIII - $12.99 (35 percent off)
  • Chrono Trigger - $4.99 (50 percent off)

For those wondering, the only classic Final Fantasy title that's left off the list (pre-FFVII) is Final Fantasy II, which is available for $3.99 and doesn't have a discount. All of these Final Fantasy games are remakes that have been found on various Nintendo and Sony consoles and handhelds.

And as a friendly reminder to those that remember playing the great Final Fantasy III on Super Nintendo, that is actually Final Fantasy VI on this list. The FFIII on this list is from the original Nintendo that was only released in Japan before Square Enix remastered and brought all the titles over to North America.

Will you be picking up any discounted titles from Square Enix over the holidays?

Image credit: Nerd Reactor

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Final Fantasy V now available on Android! https://www.gameskinny.com/9szxf/final-fantasy-v-now-available-on-android https://www.gameskinny.com/9szxf/final-fantasy-v-now-available-on-android Fri, 27 Sep 2013 09:52:41 -0400 GirlGoneGaming

I'm usually the first to cry foul when iOS users get all of the cool stuff light years ahead of us poor Android users, but retribution is at hand! Er... kind of, anyway.

The classic Final Fantasy 5 is now available on Android! All for the super low price of... $15.99!? Pause. Square Enix apparently knows that anything that harkens back to the good old Game Boy Advance days (and before the titles got so...teenage angsty) is pretty much a no-money-back-guarantee. 

I suppose I'm willing to cough up the dough (not without a little sass mind you) for the updated port, mostly because this is one of my favorite games in the series along with FFVI. But of course still no word yet on whether or not we'll ever get that long awaited port....I'm looking at extra hard at you Square Enix, you conniving SOB. Of course they know die hard fans of the classic FF games will more than likely pay for the feel, but don't expect me to not whine about it.

However they have tried to some what ease the knee jerk reflex to just go 'wtf!'  at the price tag by adding in a few new perks. This version includes the additions of the Sealed Temple dungeon and Enuo boss, along with new sprite designs and other prettier things thanks in part to series artist Kazuko Shibuya. There will also be a few new job types, which I suppose makes me feel a little but better about forking over $16 bucks. Maybe.

FINAL FANTASY V first debuted in 1992 and was the first in the series to sell over two million copies. The title was the first to allow players to better customize their characters thanks to a new job and ability system, and introduced more detailed and expressive 2D character models.

So buy it for the throwback feels, or buy it because it's just a darn good game. Either way Square Enix is probably getting my money.

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