Hardware Platform RSS Feed | GameSkinny.com Hardware RSS Feed on GameSkinny.com https://www.gameskinny.com/ en Launch Media Network SteelSeries Rival 310 and Sensei 310 Review: True 1:1 Tracking Delivered https://www.gameskinny.com/z982l/steelseries-rival-310-and-sensei-310-review-true-11-tracking-delivered https://www.gameskinny.com/z982l/steelseries-rival-310-and-sensei-310-review-true-11-tracking-delivered https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/s/t/e/steelseriesrivalsenseireviewhero-16976.png z982l/steelseries-rival-310-and-sensei-310-review-true-11-tracking-delivered Fri, 22 Sep 2017 15:02:37 -0400 Jonathan Moore

SteelSeries has been here before. With the release of the Rival 700, the peripherals company said that its flagship mouse had achieved true 1:1 tracking. And if you were to go to their website right now, you’d see that every one of their mice offers 1:1 tracking -- from the newest to the oldest, the least expensive to the most expensive. But this time around, they say they’ve truly nailed it.

And I tend to agree.

SteelSeries’ latest mice, the Rival 310 and the Sensei 310, both offer what the company calls “true 1:1 tracking”, meaning that they’ve taken 1:1 tracking and accuracy to an entirely new level with their new Truemove 3 sensor. We’ll get more into the gritty details a little later on, but suffice it to say that these mice are accurate and reliable at the highest DPIs -- no matter how fast or slow you move them across your mousepad.

Specifically designed with eSports and competitive players around the world in mind, the Rival 310 and Sensei 310 offer players high-end quality at affordable price points. Neither mouse is perfect by any means, and there are other mice on the market that provide similar functionality (outside of true 1:1 tracking) at commensurate prices. But each of these mice is well worth a look if you're in the market for a mouse that's crazy precise and won't break the bank.

Overall Design

Both the Rival 310 and the Sensei 310 are nearly identical on the outside, combining their self-same feature sets with inauspicious designs that belie their functionalities. 

Each mouse sports an understated black matte finish that offers a two-for-one combo: it looks stylish and helps reduce slippage when your palms and fingers get sweaty. To complement these finishes, each mouse has what SteelSeries calls "next-gen, upgraded" silicone grips that do a wonderful job of keeping your thumb and ring fingers adhered to the sides of the mice whether you're playing in an eSports tournament or doing menial office work. And where I often found my palms and fingers slipping on the slick surface of the Rival 700, I never once experienced any sliding or unintended palm movement in all my hours with the Rival 310 or the Sensei 310.

However, these mice aren't made for palm-grippers. Instead, the right-handed Rival 310 is made for a claw or hybrid grip style, while the ambidextrous Sensei is optimized for a pinch grip. As a palm player, I did notice a considerable variance in my preferred gripping style and the Sensei's egalitarian design, where the right side of my palm sat uncomfortably on the Sensei's right half. 

This led me to pay more attention to how my hand was positioned in my early hours with the mouse -- and I missed quite a few Paladins and Battlefield 1 headshots in the process. I eventually got used to the design, but keep that in mind if you're considering the Sensei. 

However, the Rival 310's sloped, traditionally contoured design was easily accessible and much more comfortable out of the box. It better lent itself to a palm grip style -- but in my time with it, I almost exclusively used hybrid grip style, which better helped me maneuver the mouse's build, even though it was slightly uncomfortable for my specific liking.

Because of their inauspicious designs, neither the Rival or the Sensei are weighed down with copious buttons or toggles, with the Rival sporting six buttons to the Sensei’s eight. The primary left and right buttons on each mouse provide strong feedback, while the DPI switches are snugly positioned just above the illuminated mouse wheels and are easy to access.  

For the Rival, the two side buttons are fat and positioned well within thumb’s reach, giving off solid, satisfying clicks with each press. On the other hand, since the Sensei is ambidextrous and features a less contoured design than the 310, its left- and right-side buttons are smaller and skinnier, giving your thumb and ring fingers less real estate to play with. And while the left-side buttons are fairly easy to press, the right-side buttons are stubborn little cusses -- especially if you’re a right-handed player.

For office work, I always found myself inadvertently (and frustratingly) pressing them when I moved the mouse across my QCK Prism mousepad. But when I needed them most -- during play -- I couldn’t seem to get a bead on them without contorting my hand into an infinitely uncomfortable Cronenberg. It’s a strange problem to have on a mouse so meticulously engineered, but at least each of the buttons can be disabled through SteelSeries’ Engine 3 software, never to be worried about again.

Overall Performance

The split trigger design on both the Rival 310 and the Sensei 310 means that the OMRON switches (rated at 50 million clicks) are going to be both durable and deadly. The left and right mouse buttons on these mice are lightning fast, responsive, and a pleasure to press. But none of that matters if you can’t get a bead on your target. And if you’re an eSports player, accuracy and precision are two of the biggest factors in moving through the bracket or going home.

When speaking with SteelSeries about the mice, it was clear that four key factors guided the design and engineering of both the Rival 310 and the Sensei 310: they both had to have ultra-low latency, true 1:1 tracking, advanced jitter reduction, and the fastest response times of any mouse on the planet. All difficult things to accomplish given the relative parity in the space.

But I’d like to think they’ve achieved at least some of that with both of these mice.

The star of the show is unequivocally the TrueMove Sensor 3 with advanced jitter reduction technology, which helps both mice achieve true 1:1 tracking. Developed and manufactured in concert with Pixart, the Truemove 3 is a proprietary iteration on the popular Pixart 3369 optical sensor. And as of this writing, these proprietary sensors can only be found in the Rival 310 and Sensei 310.

I found the sensors to be adequate and precise at lower DPIs, and wasn't able to notice a monumental difference between some of my Logitech mice. But that considerably changed when cranking the DPIs above 3,500. Here, the amalgamated power of these allied forces truly showcased itself.

Even at the highest DPI settings, the Sensei didn’t jitter or vibrate in the slightest. The mouse cursor moved precisely where I wanted it to go, and abruptly stopped when I needed it to. And although the Rival 310 didn’t perform as well as the Sensei 310 -- slightly jittering and moving somewhat sporadically at the highest settings -- it still performed leagues better than the sensor found in the Rival 700 when dialed into the same settings.

When testing it on the battlefield, I noticed a considerable difference in performance against mice such as the Scimitar RGB in terms of lagless aiming. Once I got a handle on the design of the Sensei 310, there was nary a difference in overall performance when playing shooters like Paladins and strategy games like Cities: Skylines. In the former, I was able to easily pull off critical shots and switch between DPIs on the fly with both mice. And in the latter, I was able to deftly navigate the game’s myriad menus and easily scroll from one side of my cities to the other no matter if I used the Rival or the Sensei.

So although I had to tune the in-game settings to get the truest, most accurate sensitivity I was looking for, my success all started with the Truemove 3 sensor.

The Verdict

Whether you’re a serious eSports gamer or a casual that’s looking for a solid mouse at a solid price, you could do much worse than the Rival 310 and Sensei 310. In essence, SteelSeries has taken a lot of what makes the Rival 700 tick, tweaked it, improved it, and stuck it into packages that retail for $59.99. That’s a damn hard deal to pass up for such a fantastic value.

My only real gripes are with the Sensei 310 -- and those gripes are more personal preference than objective reporting. And I’m happy to see that SteelSeries had the foresight to allow players to disable buttons -- specifically the shoulder buttons -- on that particular mouse. (I was a little disappointed that the Rival 310 jittered more at maximum DPI than the Sensei, but unless you plan on cranking up the volume, you won't particularly notice.) 

With nearly zero input lag, low latency, anti-jitter technology, and (from what I can tell) true 1:1 tracking up to 12,000 DPI, both the Rival 310 and Sensei 310 are dealy mice that rival my favorite head-lopper: the Logitech G302 Daedalus. And while that mouse does some of what these two do at a lower price point, I’d venture to say that you’d be better off paying the extra $20 and trying one of these out instead. (And as a Logitech guy, that’s saying something.)

You can pick up both the Rival 310 and Sensei 310 from the SteelSeries website

[Note: SteelSeries provided the Rival 310 and Sensei 310 mice that were used in this review.]

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AOC Unveils New QHD Gaming Monitor https://www.gameskinny.com/ecuvt/aoc-unveils-new-qhd-gaming-monitor https://www.gameskinny.com/ecuvt/aoc-unveils-new-qhd-gaming-monitor https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/m/o/n/monitor-5d8b0.png ecuvt/aoc-unveils-new-qhd-gaming-monitor Wed, 20 Sep 2017 16:29:28 -0400 Jonathan Moore

Today AOC, a manufacturer of high-definition computer monitors, televisions, and other display technologies, has announced its newest gaming monitor: the Agon AG322QCX. This 32-inch, curved QHD monitor is built specifically with eSports gamers and gaming enthusiasts in mind. It features a plethora of user-centric features, such as AMD freesync technology, Shadow Control, and LowBlue Mode. Other monitor features include a 144Hz refresh rate and a 4ms response time. 

The monitor's freesync technology allows for refresh rate synchronization between AMD-powered GPUs and the AG322's screen, which is meant to reduce screen-tearing, minimize stutter, and decrease input/output lag. AMD released its royalty-free freesync technology in 2015 to directly compete with Nvidia's G-sync technology and can be found in other currently-available AOC monitors. 

Receiving input from such eSports teams as Team Liquid, AOC has also incorporated Shadow Control and LowBlue Mode into the AG322QCX. These technologies reportedly work in concert to ameliorate eye fatigue caused from extended play and eSports training sessions. Both features function to reduce shadows and eliminate certain wavelengths of blue light, the latter of which some studies suggest may cause retinal damage over time.

The Agon AG322 has a resolution of 2560x1440, a single VGA port, two HDMI ports, two display ports, and two USB 3.0 ports. It currently retails for $429.99. 

Stay tuned to GameSkinny for more news about all things gaming. 

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10 Outstanding Indie Games From PAX West 2017 https://www.gameskinny.com/500wy/10-outstanding-indie-games-from-pax-west-2017 https://www.gameskinny.com/500wy/10-outstanding-indie-games-from-pax-west-2017 https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/p/a/x/pax-west-2017-banner-56afe.png 500wy/10-outstanding-indie-games-from-pax-west-2017 Wed, 06 Sep 2017 11:17:43 -0400 Greyson Ditzler (PurplePocketPirate)

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That's the list! After getting to check out all these awesome demos, I can't wait to see these indie gems release throughout the rest of this year and early next year. 

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What were your favorite games from PAX West 2017? Let us know down in the comments!

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Super Meat Boy Forever (Nintendo Switch, PC, Xbox One, PS4, iOS, Android)

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Team Meat
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Our little boy is growing up.

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As an official sequel to the critically acclaimed and famously difficult indie hit Super Meat BoySuper Meat Boy Forever has some big and very bloody shoes to fill. But we may be able to put those worries to rest, because it seems as though those same shoes still fit the sequel's squishy feet. 

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Super Meat Boy Forever is a follow-up that keeps the same spirit and familiar feel of the original game while still managing to feel completely new and original. You can still deftly dodge insta-kill obstacles using the game's simple move-set and tight controls, but there are quite a few additions and revisions to the core gameplay. 

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Both Meat Boy and Bandage Girl now run automatically, meaning that the stress of movement for the most part has been removed. Instead you must focus on the various moves you can pull off, which still includes the old wall slide, wall jump, and a high jump. But you also now have an air-dash, a sliding tackle attack, and a fast-falling downward dive. These moves lead to new obstacles, new methods of success, and of course, many new deaths.

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The speed and flow of the first game is still there, but the levels evenly balance both the classic and new mechanics in order to make them feel like something that is truly meant to succeed the original. The levels will also become harder each time you beat them, and the dark world equivalents with much more difficult design return as well. And rest assured -- Super Meat Boy Forever is just as hard as Super Meat Boy, and you'll still feel that rush of adrenaline whenever you figure out the trick to getting past that one obstacle that killed you twenty times.

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In terms of content, very little has been revealed. There's no telling how many levels we can expect out of Forever, but hopefully it's somewhere around the 300+ from the original game. There's also no word yet whether this game will feature playable characters from other indie games or not. It is confirmed that players will be able to play as either Meat Boy or Bandage Girl right from the start. 

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Super Meat Boy Forever is already shaping up to be a great game and a worthy successor. It is currently planned for release in Summer of 2018, and will come to the Nintendo Switch first.

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Wandersong (PC)

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Dumb and Fat Games
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Wandersong is a musical adventure game where you play as a bard tasked with preventing the erasure of the entire universe, and you must use your natural talents as a singer to solve puzzles and help people out with their problems. You use a series of notes represented by color-coordinated notches on a wheel in order to swing a sword, fend off ghosts, and gain the favor of passing songbirds in order to get a boost.

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The game's bright, colorful visuals, friendly comedic writing, and excellent soundtrack and sound design may make it look happy -- but there very well may be something sinister that lurks beneath it all. A mysterious force that speaks an unknown language is against you on your quest, and you'll slowly uncover what secrets it holds as the game goes on.

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Cuphead 

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Studio MDHR
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If you've been paying attention to the indie-gaming scene for the past three years or so, odds are you've heard of Cuphead. It's been in development hell for years past its expected release -- and for good reason.

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The whole game was hand-drawn using traditional animation techniques similar to the cartoons of the 1930's, particularly those of Fleischer Studios and Disney. Because of the amount of work necessary to make this style look and play smoothly, brothers Chad and Jared Moldenhauer have been working on the game for a total of nearly seven years.

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The final package exemplifies their efforts, as Cuphead is one of the most visually detailed and fluidly animated 2D games ever released. From the film-grain filter to the exaggerated facial expressions, from the bright colors to the rubber hose arms and legs, Cuphead looks and plays authentically like Contra adapted into a Merrie Melodies cartoon.

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It's a highly difficult, fast-paced run-and-gun shooter where Cuphead and his friend Mugman must take on a series of elaborate boss fights in order to appease the devil and keep their lives after losing to him in a game of chance. There are various weapons, a two-player co-op mode with Mugman, an overworld map to navigate with its own secret areas, and special moves for that extra bit of razzle-dazzle.

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Cuphead is a visually flooring, skill-testing, action-packed love letter to a golden era of animation -- and it's finally planned for release on PC and Xbox One on September 29.

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The American Dream (PS VR, Oculus Rift, HTC Vive)

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Samurai Punk 
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Have you ever heard the saying "guns are as American as apple pie"? Developer Samurai Punk of Melbourne, Australia certainly has, and they're setting out to prove how great guns make America (sarcasm) with The American Dream. It's a satirical shooting-gallery VR game where all the basics of the 1950's "American Dream" lifestyle are handled with guns.

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Whether you're feeding your baby, flipping burgers at a greasy spoon diner, putting holes in bagels on a production line, or even driving home from work, you're doing it with the help of your trusty sidearms. The game is set to take place across 20 different stages set in a Norman Rockwell-esque parody of 1950's suburban America, with an ongoing narration from the comedy stylings of "Buddy Washington".

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The guns don't have a lot of kick to them, but the actual aiming and reloading of cartridges in midair actually takes some practice and skill, making even the most menial tasks with your guns a lot of fun. The environments are also very reactive and loaded with lots of cracking, snapping, and toppling physics. 

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The American Dream is a fun and funny experience with sold gun-play that you should keep an eye out for in early 2018. If you want to get a better sense of the kind of tone that Samurai Punk is going for, then you should check out the short "educational film" they've made for the game below. It's just too funny:

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Coffence (PC)

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Sweet Bandits
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Coffence is a game about fencing with cups of coffee. This 1-on-1 fighter has you compete against an opponent to steal their coffee by using yours wisely. 

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It may not be a graphical powerhouse, but the gameplay is what makes it all worth it. Coffence has quite a lot of different tactics to take advantage of and plenty of opportunities for mind-games. Your cup of coffee is on the end of a piece of elastic string, and you must thrust it in different directions in order to knock coffee out of your opponent's cup, and then steal it out of the air before they can.

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You can also swing your cup to block attacks, perform a short-range melee swipe, jump, and move freely around the 2D arena -- or even drink some of your own coffee in order to speed yourself up and slow down your opponent. There are also different types of coffee that have different unique properties, and the characters will have slight differences, like longer reach or shorter stature that protects them from a straightforward attack.

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Coffence is a simple, pick-up-and-play fighting game with a unique hook and enough depth to be replayable. It is available now through Early Access on Steam.

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OK K.O! Let's Play Heroes (PC, PS4, Xbox One)

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Capybara Games/Cartoon Network Games
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Cartoon Network Games had a small but still impressive showing at PAX this year that included a preview of the very intriguing OK K.O! Let's Play Heroes from Capybara Games, the studio behind Superbrothers Sword & Sorcery EP and Super Time Force.

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The game is based off of the recently premiered Cartoon Network show OK K.O! Let's Be Heroes, which stars the titular KO as he and his friends seek to defend Lakewood Plaza Turbo from evil forces while also running a convenience store and leveling up to become great heroes. 

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The game is best described as a combination of an adventure game, an action RPG, and a classic arcade beat-em-up. It's equal parts combat against robots and running around the Plaza to talk to people. The fighting feels very satisfying, with plenty of moves that are easy to string into combos and keep you flowing through the battlefield, and there seems to be dozens of cards for the player to unlock and use as assists.

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What's especially interesting about this licensed game is that it began development around the same time that the show did. The developers at Capy and the show's creator Ian Jones-Quartey even visited each other's studios many times and spoke on a weekly basis in order to get better insight on the creative process for both sides.

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The show itself also shares elements with video games, such as every character having a slowly increasing level and a special move of their own, which made adapting the property into a game a lot less than difficult than it would be for some other properties. This -- alongside the game's quality writing and fantastic character and cutscene animations -- makes the game feel like you're playing through several episodes of the show and not just some failed imitation. The entire main voice cast for the show also lent their voices to the project, so the game really is just a playable version of the show.

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OK K.O! Let's Play Heroes is a quality beat-em-up and a passionate licensed game that should be enjoyable for younger and older players, as well as fans on the show and newcomers alike. 

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Save Me Mr. Tako: Tasukete Tako-San (PC, Switch)

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Christophe Galati/Nicalis
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Save Me Mr. Tako is a kind of homage that should have come along in game form a long time ago. What Shovel Knight is to the NES, and what Freedom Planet is to the Sega Genesis, Save Me Mr. Tako is to the original Game Boy. It's a 2D platformer that takes elements from some of the best and most well-known games on the system and pick-and-mixes them into something fresh yet familiar; celebrating the charm and style of the old days while moving forward with newer, more polished technology.

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The game was developed almost single-handedly by one man, Chris Deneos, who has said that he wanted to make something new using elements of all of his favorite games on the Game Boy growing upMetroid's influence is especially apparent, as Mr. Tako's main weapon temporarily immobilizes enemies and turns them into makeshift platforms, much like the Ice Beam.

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While Save Me Mr. Tako isn't the first game to try and imitate the Game Boy style of presentation, it's definitely one of the best attempts I've seen yet. The graphical style, the quality of sprites and color palettes, the simple-yet-expressive animations, the dialogue boxes, the catchy chirping 8-bit music...every bit of it is right on the nose in terms of paying tribute to this beloved period in early handheld gaming.

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While the game is inspired by simpler time in gaming, Chris Deneos didn't just leave it at that -- opting for a somewhat darker, more mature story than any Game Boy game really did. Mr. Tako is an octopus who's part of a greater army of octopi that's at war with the humans on the mainland. Deneos wanted to depict both sides as simply doing what they thought was best for their people, and show Mr. Tako as a man caught in the middle of it all after saving a human princess from execution, doing his best to be kind and not hate anyone.

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Save Me Mr. Tako is a passion project from Chris Deneos that he's really put his heart into -- and even quit his full-time job to finish. This fun, charming throwback to a more innocent time in gaming with a fresh take is currently planned for release on Nintendo Switch and Steam later this year. 

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Way of the Passive Fist (PC, PS4, Xbox One)

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Household Games
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Way of the Passive Fist is a twist on the classic beat-em-up genre with a motto of "the best offense is a good defense". Instead of making your way through hordes of enemies by beating them down with punches and kicks, you must instead defend yourself with a series of blocks and parries in order to tire out your enemies, whereupon you can move on.

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The gameplay is less of a chaotic violent mishmash like the arcade games that inspired it, and more of a rhythmic combat game with a lot of stress management, pattern memorization, and prioritizing threats in order to effectively take down your murderous opponents. You also level up and gain new abilities as you go along, keeping the gameplay fresh. As a bonus, the variety of customization options for difficulty and playstyle make a low barrier for entry and a high skill ceiling.

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The sprite work is also well-executed and neatly captures the look of the overly animated and (often colorfully designed) characters of older arcade beat-em-ups like X-Men and Turtles in Time. The sound design is solid as well, giving every enemy a distinct and bit-crushed grunt, and making sure that all moves are choreographed by sound as well as sight. Last but not least, the pumping music succeeds in making a mostly non-combative situation feel intense.

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Way of the Passive Fist is a new take on an old idea that manages to evoke the past while also breaking new ground. It is planned for release on Steam, PS4, and Xbox One in early 2018.

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Blasters of the Universe (Oculus Rift, HTC Vive)

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Secret Location
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Blasters of the Universe is the kind of game that had to happen eventually. It takes the frantic twitch-reflexes of a bullet-hell shooter and brings it to first-person virtual reality. This sci-fi shooter that expects you to physically duck, dodge, twist, turn, and just generally keep on your toes and stay alert so that you don't get shot in the side by half-a-dozen floating metal heads.

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The demo had me on the floor, shooting sideways and tilting my whole body on several occasions, but it never became overbearing because I was never required to completely turn around. I did constantly have to turn my head left and right in order to keep track of the action and enemy threats -- but by keeping the danger in a rough 180 degree area, it never took me unfairly by surprise.

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Though the game will only feature four levels, it will also feature a vast number of weapon combinations as well as a scoreboard, which may help encourage players to replay in a variety of ways and improve their high score. Blasters of the Universe was an intense, enjoyable, and fresh-feeling burst of neon colors and glowing red bullets that I can easily recommend to VR enthusiasts looking for a well-made and immersive action game. 

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Blasters of the Universe is available now on Steam for VR devices.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/90a83f5004ec823c76e1162adc150433.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/90a83f5004ec823c76e1162adc150433.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"11370","description":"

Monster Prom (PC)

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Beautiful Glitch
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Okay, stop me if you've heard this one before: Monster Prom is a competitive dating-sim party game about trying to be popular in a monster high school so that you can take one of the cool ghouls to prom. No? You've never heard that one before? Yeah, me neither.

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It's a refreshing take on both party games and dating-sims, using its gameplay to tell jokes and start conversations among the players, as well as tell a variety of small character-stories with it's diverse and highly likable cast of characters. Every round is constantly throwing jokes and surprises at you with barely a minute to breathe, and the art speaks as many volumes about the characters as the writing does.

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The core mechanics take some inspiration from tabletop gaming -- likw the stats doled out at the beginning and gained through decisions in conversations, as well as the frequent occasions where the players are advised to talk among themselves and create different scenarios in order to advance the game. It's almost like playing a game of Dungeons & Dragons where your DM is a snarky bisexual millennial who's kind of drunk -- and that's a lot of fun. 

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It's also a game that cleverly avoids the local-play issues of the PC by allowing up to four players to participate while only using one controller. It's a great game to break out with friends and strangers alike -- assuming they can appreciate more than a few raunchy jokes and out-there writing. It had me and everyone who even glanced at the booth while walking by laughing quite a lot.

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The game boasts a lot of different scenarios that can occur based on the player's decisions, although I did see some people pick the same options in two different games, so your mileage may vary. The sense of humor may not be for everybody, since it's pretty raunchy and often very sexual -- but if you're interested in that sort of thing, then you're gonna have a great time.

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Monster Prom truly feels like a new idea for both dating sims and party games, and by the end of each game you'll want the whole cast to sign your yearbook. The game is currently planned to release some time in October. 

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/p/a/x/pax-west-2017-banner-56afe.png","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/p/a/x/pax-west-2017-banner-56afe.png","type":"slide","id":"168637","description":"

PAX West 2017 had tons of great games on display, but the indies in particular were abundant and especially interesting this year -- so we've put together this list of some of the most unique and standout titles among the independent crowd for you to consider checking out in the future.

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We can't promise you that all of these games are great, but they're all definitely good, and they're definitely interesting. Enough stalling...let's see what these independent endeavors have to offer!

"}]]]>
Cherry MX Board 6.0 Review: Heavy on Quality, Light on Features https://www.gameskinny.com/lqi6v/cherry-mx-board-60-review-heavy-on-quality-light-on-features https://www.gameskinny.com/lqi6v/cherry-mx-board-60-review-heavy-on-quality-light-on-features https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/h/e/cherry-board-30821.jpg lqi6v/cherry-mx-board-60-review-heavy-on-quality-light-on-features Tue, 05 Sep 2017 15:52:56 -0400 Jonathan Moore

For more than 40 years, Cherry has been designing and manufacturing some of the best keyboard switches in the world. It's a safe bet that almost every gaming or enthusiast keyboard you've ever owned has most likely been comprised of Cherry's keys, whether they be blue, brown, or red. Historically, these keys can take a veritable beating year after year, match after match -- and still absolutely blow other switches out of the water. 

But even though I've had the privilege of testing Cherry's switches for some time now, I haven't had the opportunity to test out one of their proprietary keyboards. Until now. 

Like the mechanical keys that have served us gamers well over the years, the Cherry MX Board 6.0 doesn't disappoint. It's a strong keyboard and a solid mechanical choice for office or design work. It's impeccably made and showcases some of the best that German keyboard engineering has to offer. Though this board does have its drawbacks and may not be the perfect choice if you're a gamer, it eschews bells and whistles for practical functionality -- at which it excels. 

Unboxing the Cherry MX Board 6.0 

After unboxing and reviewing so many keyboards, it's refreshing to see a company go a little above and not simply wrap their board in plastic inside a flimsy box. Instead, Cherry goes another route, wrapping the MX Board 6.0 in an urbane felt sleeve and sturdy thick-carboard box. It's definitely not a selling point by any means, but it does speak to the care and effort put into the rest of the board.

And that's about it -- you won't be overloaded with fluff. You get the keyboard and a generous 6.5-foot braided cord. Unlike other boards, such as the SteelSeries Apex, you won't get extra detachable parts that'll you'll just end up losing -- or have to dutifully keep up with if you want to change them out. 

The downside is that the Cherry MX Board 6.0 doesn't come with any extra keycaps or a keycap puller, which can make customization a bit more painful. But you can easily buy these via almost any third-party vendor for relatively cheap, so it's not a huge deal.  

Cherry MX Board 6.0 Design 

Remember what I said about no bells and whistles? The Cherry MX Board 6.0 doesn't bother itself with pomp and circumstance -- catering moreso to the serious typist and enthusiast than the hardcore gamer. 

You've got the standard number of keys here at 104, as well as the typical numpad. Above that are your extra keys: three of these are your standard playback buttons (rewind, play/pause, and fast-forward), while the fourth is the Cherry key that locks the board's Windows button, and other macros such as ctrl+alt+delete and alt+tab. Outside of that, you have several alternate modes mapped to the F, print screen, and pause keys -- such as volume and brightness, SysRQ, and Break, respectively. 

Since the Board 6.0 doesn't have any software to speak of, you won't be able to customize its lighting like you would with other backlit, RGB gaming keyboards. But that's okay, because each key is backlit by vibrant, red LEDs -- with the exception of five. The caps lock, scroll lock, Windows, num, and function keys have a switchable blue/red mode, where blue indicates that the button is active, red inactive. But regardless of the button's color, each key is luminous enough to see in a brightly lit room -- and the brightness function keys, which can adjust the board's overall brilliance up or down by 1% or 10% intervals, keep these LEDs from burning your eyes out in a dim room. 

Finally, all of that is housed in a brawny aluminum chassis. Where some other keyboard chassis feel a bit flimsy (even Corsair's flagship K95 RGB Platinum is guilty), the MX Board 6.0 most certainly doesn't. Coming in at a minimum thickness of 2.3 millimeters across the board -- and thicker in some places -- the chassis doesn't bend in the slightest. I even tried to bend and twist it, and not only did it resolutely hold its form, it didn't once creak. Although you (definitely) shouldn't try this, it feels like you could swing this board against a brick wall and it would come away without a single scratch. 

Cherry MX Board 6.0 Functionality

It's safe to say that a Cherry keyboard is going to use Cherry switches. That's a no-brainer -- and this board features the company's Cherry MX Reds. These keys are insanely accurate and register with the slightest pressure (45 centinewtons, to be exact). 

With complete N-Key rollover and 100% anti-ghosting, the gold crosspoint switches featured on this board are highly accurate and highly responsive. Registered for more than 50 million presses, these Reds feel crazy good to press. Each key is sturdy underneath your finger, lending a sense of power to each keystroke. 

And unlike some other boards that don't use precision keycaps, the switches on the Cherry MX Board 6.0 never once felt flimsy or cheap. Since I'm a rough player and tend to press keys pretty hard, I appreciate a weighty keycap that won't fly off the handle and a switch that doesn't creak after mild usage. 

Another thing I really appreciate about this board is it's great for twitch-firing in SMITE or Paladins matches, where you have to get an ult or ability off in a nanosecond. You won't have to worry about initiating full key presses on the Board 6.0, which better helps you keep your eyes and attention on-screen. And that's because the Cherry MX Board 6.0 uses an analog signal path, meaning that there's no digital scanning between switch points. Essentially, your keystroke is going to register faster -- in a millisecond instead of 20 milliseconds. 

Rounding it all out is the board's wrist rest. Using a magnet instead of the notch and groove design found in many other similar keyboards, the MX Board's wrist rest is made of hard plastic with a comfortable rubber padding gracing its surface. 

It would have been nice if the rest had been made of the same sturdy aluminum as the board's chassis -- the plastic is resilient, but does bend slightly under pressure. However, what I do like about the Board's wrist rest is that it's easily attachable/detachable. The magnet simply slides into an easy-to-find recess in the middle-front of the board and it's attached. This made carrying the board/rest combo to and from work a breeze. 

Verdict 

It is a bit of a bummer that the Cherry MX Board 6.0 doesn't have more customization options, macro functionality, or any dedicated programmable keys like some of Corsair's and Logitech's gaming keyboards. So if you're a MOBA, MMO, or competitive player that needs that functionality to survive, unfortunately you won't find it here. 

On the other hand, if you're a keyboard enthusiast, serious typist, or a casual gamer that's looking for a reliable keyboard that boasts some of the best switches on the market, N-key rollover, and fast response times, the Cherry MX Board 6.0 is a great choice.

At the end of the day, it's hard to justify the over $200 price tag for this keyboard when its competitors offer so much more -- such as RGB lighting, macro adjustments, and dedicated keys. And the Cherry MX Board 6.0 most likely won't find a large audience outside its niche because of that, which is truly a shame because it is one of the most comfortable and responsive keyboards I've used in a long time. 

[Note: Cherry provided the keyboard used for this review.]

]]>
Universal, Digital Domain Announce Voltron VR Chronicles https://www.gameskinny.com/0yhgz/universal-digital-domain-announce-voltron-vr-chronicles https://www.gameskinny.com/0yhgz/universal-digital-domain-announce-voltron-vr-chronicles https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/ca64574500f9141b7a3de8ac98ec906c.jpg 0yhgz/universal-digital-domain-announce-voltron-vr-chronicles Tue, 29 Aug 2017 16:16:42 -0400 Erroll Maas

Today, Digital Domain and Universal have announced Voltron VR Chronicles, a new virtual reality game for HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, and PlayStation VR based on the Netflix animated series Voltron: Legendary Defender.

In Voltron VR Chronicles, the player will take the role of one of the paladins of Voltron to participate in space battles, solve puzzles, and complete challenges. Not much gameplay has been shown so far, but it's fair to speculate that the game will be a brief experience similar to Batman Arkham VR and PlayStation Worlds, due to its $14.99 price point. The game will be released on September 26, but PS VR owners who pre-order it today will get a 20% discount.

The first season of Voltron: Legendary Defender premiered on Netflix on June 10, 2016, with the second season premiering on January 20. The third season, which is half the length of the previous two seasons, premiered on August 4 and the fourth season will premiere on October 13. The series is notable for being made by some of the same people and the same animation studio behind Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra.

Stay tuned to GameSkinny for more news and information on Voltron VR Chronicles as it develops. 

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Best Cheap PC Gaming Mice for Any Budget in 2017 https://www.gameskinny.com/njb0s/best-cheap-pc-gaming-mice-for-any-budget-in-2017 https://www.gameskinny.com/njb0s/best-cheap-pc-gaming-mice-for-any-budget-in-2017 https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/o/v/cov1-0c85f.jpg njb0s/best-cheap-pc-gaming-mice-for-any-budget-in-2017 Fri, 18 Aug 2017 11:34:38 -0400 Ty Arthur

[{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/a/c/backcov-6418b.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/b/a/c/backcov-6418b.jpg","type":"slide","id":"167431","description":"

From less than 10 bucks all the way into the low $60 range, those are all the best mice currently available for the gamer on a budget. Still looking for more high tech gear to improve your gaming experience? Be sure to check out our other list of awesome hardware:

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What did you think of our picks, and what less expensive mice should we add to this list? Let us know in the comments section! 

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/r/a/z/razerdeathadderelite-57370.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/r/a/z/razerdeathadderelite-57370.jpg","type":"slide","id":"167441","description":"

Razer Death Adder Elite

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Current Price: $61.99
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Get It Here

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Here we are with the cream of the crop while still being in anything resembling a decent price range. League Of Legends world champs swear by this thing, and there's a reason for that.

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It has less of that high tech appearance and fewer visible bells and whistles -- but in terms of ergonomics, there really isn't a more comfortable gaming mouse out there.

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The Death Adder wouldn't be the best if it lacked in features though, and it has those in spades: 16,000 DPI, a 50 million click lifespan, and absurd customization on the LED options.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/r/a/z/razernagahex-748d1.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/r/a/z/razernagahex-748d1.jpg","type":"slide","id":"167440","description":"

Razer Naga Hex

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Current Price: $60.59
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Get It Here

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We're now officially in "high end" territory and on the cusp of leaving behind the quaint village of budget-friendlysburg. At 16,000 DPI you don't really get better responsiveness than this.

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For MMOs, MOBAs, or survival sims where you might want to assign a bunch of different keys to a specific mouse click, you can't get much better than what the Naga Hex offers.

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There's seven conveniently placed buttons right next to your thumb for rapid firing out those abilities as soon as their cool downs end, along with two more on the top. The only potential downside is the rounded, curvy design, which is quite a bit different from Razer's flagship Death Adder.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/l/o/g/logitechproteus-56ca4.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/l/o/g/logitechproteus-56ca4.jpg","type":"slide","id":"167442","description":"

Logitech Proteus G502

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Current Price: $58.99
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Get It Here

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The Proteus almost looks like a mask Corvo should be wearing while silently tracking prey through the streets of Dunwall... and here's the thing -- its just as customizable as your experience playing through Dishonored.

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There's 11 buttons that can all be assigned, and you can even shift the weights in the bottom of the mouse to get your perfect center of gravity for optimal gaming.

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The included software also lets you sync the LEDs to any other Logitech devices you have (like keyboard, speakers, etc.) for a truly streamlined lighting experience.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/4/1/x/41x5rpcxpl-6ec58.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/4/1/x/41x5rpcxpl-6ec58.jpg","type":"slide","id":"167439","description":"

Corsair Gaming M65 Pro RGB FPS

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Current Price: $47.50
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Get It Here

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There are several different versions of the Corsair M65 floating around the various electronics sites, all with slightly different specs. In terms of price point meeting features, this is the one you want. It comes packed with backlit LEDs and 12,000 DPI.

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Everything about this mouse screams "buy me for FPS glory!" -- from its weight distribution to the sniper mode button directly next to your thumb, which is really the big draw. This mode lowers the DPI while zoomed in with a gun for better tracking, then ups the DPI again when you zoom out so you can go back to twitchy movements.

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It's also a bit bigger than the Razer mice, so if you want high end but don't want something tiny, this is your mouse.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/r/e/d/reddragonm801-57d98.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/r/e/d/reddragonm801-57d98.jpg","type":"slide","id":"167437","description":"

Redragon M801

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Current Price: $26.99
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Get It Here

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Nine buttons, five different memory profiles for assigning different keys, braided cord, excellent textured feel: this one's pretty well got it all for a mid-range on the price point. The software for mapping keys is simple, and there's plenty of LED color options. If you dig the red color scheme and angular design, this should easily be your go-to mouse.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/l/o/g/logitechg300s-6003d.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/l/o/g/logitechg300s-6003d.jpg","type":"slide","id":"167436","description":"

Logitech G300S

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Current Price: $25.55
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Get It Here

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Splitting the difference between form and function, Logitech's G300S goes for a sleek version of the standard mouse design, rather than the futuristic angular designs of more expensive models.

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It's not lacking in features though -- including a whopping nine buttons, with most of them on the top rather than the side. Both sides also feature the same curve, making it an ambidextrous option for the left-handed players out there.

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Take note of the size, however. This one's slightly smaller than the average gaming mouse. So if you've got big hands, you might want to try something different.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/e/b/l/eblue-9cc44.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/e/b/l/eblue-9cc44.jpg","type":"slide","id":"167435","description":"

E-Blue Mazer II

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Current Price: $19.99
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Get It Here

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Although this one has lower DPI than most of the other mice presented here, the draw is that it's wireless. If you don't need top-tier DPI for twitchy online shooters and prefer wireless, give this one a go. The rubberized scroll wheel, smooth blue LEDs, and air wing design are a thing of beauty.

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While you won't spend much on the mouse itself, beware of the potential battery cost, however -- this one isn't designed for the slightly larger rechargeable batteries (which can get stuck), so be ready to have a steady supply of standard AAs on hand.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/v/i/c/victake-b7e5e.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/v/i/c/victake-b7e5e.jpg","type":"slide","id":"167433","description":"

VicTake Wired USB Gaming Mouse

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Current Price: $13.75
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Get It Here

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Sleeker and slightly higher quality on the construction front than the previous mouse, this low-cost VicTake looks great and has solid LEDs. With seven buttons and an option to cycle through DPI settings, you can't really go wrong here if you only have a small budget but want to try out something above and beyond your standard mouse.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/h/a/v/havit-798f7.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/h/a/v/havit-798f7.jpg","type":"slide","id":"167432","description":"

HAVIT HV-MS672

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Current Price: $7.99
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Get It Here

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If you want something stylish that looks phenomenal on your desk and has a few extra buttons, you just simply can't beat this price. Even some low quality office mouse with no responsiveness at all is going to cost you more than eight bucks at Walmart.

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Besides your standard scroll wheel and side buttons, this one has a DPI scroll wheel, letting you change the mouse sensitivity on the fly for playing different types of games or using different modes within FPS games.

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There's a downside for the price, however, as the buttons aren't placed as ergonomically as they could be. And the LEDs cycle through a breathing pattern rather than sticking to one color you like.

"},{"image":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/o/v/cov1-0c85f.jpg","thumb":"https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/c/o/v/cov1-0c85f.jpg","type":"slide","id":"167430","description":"

Tired of that clunky mouse that came bundled with your system? Upgrading to a gaming-quality model can create a radical change in your experience -- whether you prefer shooters, MOBAs, strategy games, or anything in between.

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When perusing options for a gaming mouse, you should be on the lookout for high DPI, high click lifespan, and at least some cool bells and whistles in terms of lighting and extra buttons. Wireless is nice, of course, but at that point you'll see the price skyrocket in most instances.

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Here we're rounding up some of the absolute best mice you can buy without dropping a whole lot of cash. For our purposes, we're going with anything under $65 as "cheap," with the mice here ranging from a very budget-friendly $7.99 all the way up to higher end models at $61.99.

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Each mouse is listed in order of price, from lowest to highest, with five mice specifically under $30 for those with less to spend, as well as handful in the $50-$60 range that offer extremely high end options without getting into absurd triple-digit pricing. 

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Keep in mind that these prices will fluctuate over time and between retailers as sales come and go -- so you may need to search around to find the best deal.

"}]]]>
SteelSeries Rival 700 Review: An Accurate Mouse Laden With Bells and Whistles https://www.gameskinny.com/wnkp2/steelseries-rival-700-review-an-accurate-mouse-laden-with-bells-and-whistles https://www.gameskinny.com/wnkp2/steelseries-rival-700-review-an-accurate-mouse-laden-with-bells-and-whistles https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/r/i/v/rival-700-header-6df84.png wnkp2/steelseries-rival-700-review-an-accurate-mouse-laden-with-bells-and-whistles Fri, 04 Aug 2017 10:46:20 -0400 Jonathan Moore

For the modern PC gamer, choosing a good gaming mouse isn't just about functionality and performance. More and more, it's equally about customizability and distinguished aesthetic. With hyper-personalization in vogue across the market via RGB lighting, infinitely programmable buttons, and granular DPI dialing, the SteelSeries Rival 700 crashes through the gates brandishing a few new weapons in the ever-escalating peripherals arms race. 

Some of these additions are competent and exciting, letting the mouse take interesting steps forward on the tech front -- but others seem more like gimmicks than truly useful iterations. In a world flooded with gaming mice and other must-have peripherals, the Rival 700 pulls off its ideas well enough to stand out, even if those ideas function in some situations better than others.

Let's jump in and see what the Rival does for casual and experienced gamers alike -- and if it's worth it. 

The Rival 700's Design

Unlike some gaming mice on the market today, such as Corsair's Scimitar RGB Pro, the Rival 700 is nothing to gawk at out of the box. Featuring a slick black finish on its backplate, and a matte black finish on the left- and right-click buttons, the Rival 700 is sleek and professional, if not understated. Textured rubber grips on the left and right sides set off the look while also giving your fingers firm purchase of the mouse while in use.

As for its size, the Rival 700 measures 1.65 inches deep, 2.70 inches wide, and 4.59 inches high. And while it's not the biggest gaming mouse on the market, its relatively hefty size had me worried it might not comfortably fit my hand or playstyle. But after a few hours of use, I was glad to find that the mouse grew more and more comfortable the longer I used it, snugly fitting into my hand to allow for both palm- and claw-grip use.

But the Rival 700's design comes with two important caveats. First, its asymmetrical shape means this mouse is for righties only, which is a bit of a bummer considering how good it feels to hold for long periods of time. And second, an arguably more important point: The Rival 700's side buttons are awkwardly placed, to put it lightly.

The back-most thumb button is easily pressed if using a palm-grip style -- even if you don't mean to. And no matter which style you choose, the front thumb button is woefully out of reach, meaning you'll have to completely shift your grip to press it 100% of the time. It's not a deal-breaker, of course, but it feels like an oversight for a mouse that's obviously been meticulously engineered. 

Customizing the Rival 700

Like many modern mice, the Rival 700 features myriad customization options -- some right out of the box and others after you've downloaded SteelSeries' Engine 3 software.

Modular Customization


Out of the box, the Rival 700's modular design lets you choose between a 6-foot braided cable and a 3-foot plastic cable. Changing these out is a breeze, requiring no more effort than unplugging one from the front of the mouse and plugging the other in. On top of that, you're also able to easily change out the mouse's backplate -- although you'll have to plunk down some extra cash to do so.

For $14.99, you can nab SteelSeries' Cover Pack, which features one glossy black backplate and one matte black backplate. And for $19.99, you can purchase the Cover Color Pack, which features red, blue, and white backplates. Both seem like pricey additions for a mouse that already retails at $99.99, but having the option to change things up is a nice touch if you're into that sort of thing.

And for what it's worth, there's also a customizable name plate on the back of the Rival 700 that lets you emblazon the mouse with anything from your name to your favorite phrase. You'll just need to know how to use a 3D printer. SteelSeries provides the necessary files to get started -- but with a relatively high barrier to entry, I don't see many average gamers taking advantage of this customization option.   

RGB Customization

As for tailoring the Rival 700's RGB lighting options, there are plenty of available avenues as SteelSeries' Engine 3 lets you choose from more than 16.8 million colors and five different illumination effects. These can be selected for the whole mouse or for individual sectors, such as underneath the mouse wheel or for the SteelSeries logo on the Rival's backplate. If you've owned -- or even tinkered with -- an RGB mouse before, you know what's going on here. 

DPI Customization
  

For DPI, the 700 doesn't reinvent the wheel but instead provides you with the granular sensitivity options you've come to expect from modern gaming mice. It allows for two distinct DPI (CPI) settings -- each ranging from 100 to 16,000 -- which you can easily switch between with the DPI toggle just below the mouse wheel. And based on your preference of laser sensor vs. optical sensor, you can easily switch the 700's stock PixArt PMW 3360 optical sensor for a PixArt 9800 laser sensor simply by removing four screws on the bottom of the mouse.

OLED Display Customization

An interesting (if not odd) addition to the Rival 700 is the inclusion of a white and black OLED screen on the front-left corner of the mouse. Using Engine 3, you can display a 128x36 logo or GIF on the screen, either of your own making or from SteelSeries' small pre-made selection.

But that's not the only use for the screen; you can also display in-game information, such as your K/D, and your current DPI settings. The problem is that the screen is so small that it's near impossible to see during a firefight or frenetic arena battle. And since the only games that display real-time in-game information are those included with Engine 3, your options are terribly limited until SteelSeries adds more supported games to the software. 

Overall, it's an interesting addition and shows that SteelSeries is constantly thinking outside of the box when engineering their mice (which is a very good thing), but the OLED display doesn't really add anything of true value to the Rival 700. It's more of a cool vanity item than anything truly revolutionary. 

Haptic Feedback

Haptic feedback isn't new technology, but the Rival 700 is one of the first gaming mice to implement the feature. As such, I was a bit dubious on the prospect of a rumbling mouse. I had also somehow convinced myself that the technology, which heavily features in console gaming, would somehow affect the accuracy of the Rival 700. Long story short: it does and it doesn't. 

The main draw here is that the tactile feedback is supposed to alert you to specific in-game events, such as when cooldowns are expiring or when you're running low on health. But unless you're playing one of the few games that are compatible with Engine 3, you're going to have to manually program the alerts into the Rival 700. And that process can be a real pain in the ass.

It took me about 5 minutes to figure out that Victor's grenade cooldown in Paladins was 8 seconds -- and then I had to convert seconds into milliseconds to program the mouse. And that was just for one champion on a roster of 30, all who have different cooldown timers for various abilities. 

It's easy to see that this feature can get pretty cumbersome and inefficient when working outside of the designated Engine 3 games. And for games like SMITE, where CDR items and other abilities constantly buff and debuff cooldowns, it's impossible to effectively program the Rival 700's haptic feedback feature. 

Verdict

The Rival 700 is a good mouse. Being the flagship of the SteelSeries line, it ought to be. It's reliable. It's accurate. It's precise. It's flexible. Thing is, a lot of other mice are, too, making it difficult to argue that the Rival 700 really does anything revolutionary to put it at the head of the pack. Its OLED display is fun, but not entirely useful. Its modular design is perfect for personalization but can get pricey for a mouse that starts at $99. And its rumble feature is innovative, but not ubiquitous (which is a huge bummer). 

If you loved the Rival 500 from SteelSeries, the Rival 700 is a natural progression in that line and a must-buy. It is currently available on Amazon for $72.46. If you want a mouse that's ready to rock right out of the box, you may want to check out SteelSeries' other offerings, such as the Rival 310.  

Note: SteelSeries provided the Rival 700 for this review.

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Destiny 2 Guide: Fixing the Termite Beta Error https://www.gameskinny.com/4vg3l/destiny-2-guide-fixing-the-termite-beta-error https://www.gameskinny.com/4vg3l/destiny-2-guide-fixing-the-termite-beta-error https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/2/2/5/2259728c124141a.jpg 4vg3l/destiny-2-guide-fixing-the-termite-beta-error Fri, 21 Jul 2017 22:58:31 -0400 Michael Dellapi

The Beta period for Destiny 2 is in full swing, and players are flocking servers to experience Bungie's newest FPS. However, a number of users have reported server issues accompanied by certain error codes. Each of these error codes is accompanied by the name of an animal.

One particular error, entitled "TERMITE" is a very common occurrence, and happens when you try to log into the beta. Its description is as follows:

"Failed to download configuration from Bungie servers, please try again."

Bungie is aware of the issue, and has given players some key pieces of information to try and resolve it before reaching out to the Help forums on the Bungie site. 

While there is no official way to resolve the problem, it appears to be caused by periods of high server activity. Given that this is a beta, issues like this are common and are used to stress-test the servers for a better gameplay experience upon official release.

How to Fix the Termite Error in Destiny 2

One of the most common ways to resolve this issue is to exit Destiny 2 and relaunch the game. If the problem persists, players can try re-downloading the game entirely. 

In addition to redownloading Destiny 2 entirely, another solution is to restore the licenses of the game. To do this on PS4, you need to go to the following menus:

Settings>Playstation Network/Account Management>Restore Licenses.

This is a good last resort to remedy the issue before contacting Bungie support directly. 

---

Until Bungie's servers can handle the player population for Destiny 2, this problem will likely persist throughout the beta. But if you do get past it and manage to play, check out the rest of our Destiny 2 guides to make sure you're ahead of the competition:

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No One in The Industry Wants to Admit VR is a Gimmick https://www.gameskinny.com/n2mja/no-one-in-the-industry-wants-to-admit-vr-is-a-gimmick https://www.gameskinny.com/n2mja/no-one-in-the-industry-wants-to-admit-vr-is-a-gimmick https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/g/a/l/gallery-1457363816-htc-virtual-reality-headset-a82e0.jpg n2mja/no-one-in-the-industry-wants-to-admit-vr-is-a-gimmick Fri, 30 Jun 2017 19:06:40 -0400 glados131

Virtual reality is on the rise at the moment. This exciting new technology is something that nearly everyone has at least some interest in, and who can blame them? Getting fully immersed in a game via VR has been a fantasy for almost as long as gaming has existed. And now, it's closer than ever to being a reality.

However, we should be extremely wary about accepting the current state of VR as "finished" or "mainstream". While incredible, the technology has a long journey ahead before that's a reality for a number of reasons.

The Price

The first and most obvious issue with VR is the price. Most consoles these days go for around $300 (or $500 if you're called the Xbox One X). The two biggest VR headsets, the Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive, are priced at a whopping $600 and $800 respectively (note: the Oculus price is including the touch controllers).


Pretty much the only affordable way to experience VR.

The price on its own is intimidating enough, but then you need to consider the specs. You need a powerful computer to run VR. On a decent PC, you can get away with most visually demanding games-- a little frame lag is possible to work through. This, however, is unacceptable in VR. The framerate needs to be as crisp as possible to avoid motion sickness-- and to just maintain the illusion that you're in a virtual world. So if your computer is just "okay", you're not only looking at the price of the headset itself (plus accessories), you're potentially looking at getting a new graphics card or even a new computer altogether if you own a laptop. This lack of affordability amounts to a fairly damning lack of demand when it comes to VR.

The Technology

The price is one thing, but another is the technology itself. Because it is so new, there is very little standardization on how to work with it. I have actually worked on a few VR games myself, and each of them went through massive technical difficulties simply because there's currently no widely used software that's built specifically to develop in VR.


Pictured: The VR developer experience.

A similar issue with the technology is that the only popular item is the headsets. There are companies working on products like 360 degree treadmills and even haptic suits, but those are being developed separately from the headsets. Another vitally important thing that's still being worked on is eye tracking. At the moment, the Rift and the Vive cannot track your eye movements, but once that changes, the ramifications are huge. Once the headsets are able to tell where you're looking in a game, they will only have to render what is in your immediate field of view. This means that the graphical requirements we talked about above will go down drastically, resulting in a lower price investment.

The Games

Technology is one thing, but what good is a piece of gaming hardware without games? Well, this isn't an issue, as there are plenty of games available for the Rift and Vive. Or are there?

Well, there are, but that comes with a major caveat; there are a precious few-- if any-- full-length games designed specifically with VR in mind.

VR games these days tend to fall into a couple categories. The most common are what basically amount to tech demos, or environments to explore. This includes games like I Expect You To Die, Rick and Morty VRand the like. It should be noted that I Expect You To Die is an excellent game, and one that will help illustrate a point later on. There is, however, one trait these games all share: they are short. Nearly all games that have been developed for VR feel more like a proof-of-concept than a fully realized, fleshed out game. Even incredibly fun games like Budget Cuts and SUPERHOT VR fall into this category.

There are longer games you can play in VR, however. Some AAA releases like Resident Evil 7, and more recently DOOM and Skyrim have options to play in VR. However, the fact that these games weren't originally designed for it is a bigger problem than you think. Designing for VR is drastically different than doing so for more standard platforms. A great example is I Expect You To Die. Every facet of the game is designed with VR in mind, from the stationary position it puts you in to the sheer amount of item interactions that have been coded in. The CEO of Schell Games (the developers of IEYTD), Jessie Schell, wrote an extensive blog post where he discussed these differences at length (you should take note of lessons two and three in particular). The games I listed above, while they can be played in VR, do not follow these guidelines. Eventually we might have full-length games designed directly for the medium, but there needs to be a demand first, and that means the price will have to go down.


Because it definitely needed a VR version.

VR is a medium with a lot of potential, but it has a long way to go before that potential is fully realized. Between the price, lack of standardization, and lack of full-length games, it's currently more of a fun gimmick than a mainstream product. Granted, this will change with time, but the only question is... how much?

What are your thoughts on VR capabilities? Do you think it has a future? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

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Corsair K68 Keyboard Melds Dust, Water Resistance With Proven Reliability https://www.gameskinny.com/1x5sq/corsair-k68-keyboard-melds-dust-water-resistance-with-proven-reliability https://www.gameskinny.com/1x5sq/corsair-k68-keyboard-melds-dust-water-resistance-with-proven-reliability https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/k/6/8/k68-red-03a07.png 1x5sq/corsair-k68-keyboard-melds-dust-water-resistance-with-proven-reliability Fri, 16 Jun 2017 16:50:02 -0400 Jonathan Moore

I've reviewed enough Corsair products at this point that I can confidently say the company is nearing the pinnacle of peripherals development. However, that doesn't mean that the Corsair K68 mechanical keyboard doesn't bring some new innovations to the table.

But it does mean that outside of several new advancements, the K68 ticks many of the same boxes as other keyboards in the company's line, specifically those of the Corsair K63.  

So what's the biggest difference between the two keyboard, besides about $20? Let's take a look. 

The Corsair K68 is (Mostly) Water and Dust Resistant

Unlike the K63 model, the Corsair K68 adds several new features that make it dust and water resistant up to IP32 standards. And for those that don't know what the heck IP32 stands for, here's a quick rundown.

The International Protection Rating, also known as the Ingress Protection Rating, was developed to measure how electronic products (such as keyboards) are protected against intrusion from dust, water, and other foreign bodies. It's an important system because it informs consumers on product protections via a demonstrable number, instead of relying on traditional "waterproof" marketing mumbo jumbo. 

So while the Corsair K68 isn't waterproof or dust proof, an IP32 rating means that it is protected against dust particles and debris larger than 2.5mm, as well as vertical water spillage and dripping water.   

How Does It Do It? 

 

Corsair's engineers specifically designed the K68's defenses from the inside out. First, a translucent rubber covering keeps water from seeping into the plate-mounted Cherry MX switches. It also keeps dust and other debris from entering the keyboard chassis itself. Secondly, the K68 contains built-in channels within the chassis to funnel any residual water past components and out of drainage ports on the keyboard's backside. 

I inadvertently tested this functionality when I spilled what we'll just call an ice-cold beverage on the K68 during a frenetic, late-night Paladins match. Tilting the keyboard to dump the beverage was easy, and the little bit that did make it into the keyboard dripped out of the back for easy cleanup. About six hours of use later, and the keys still function as good as new.  

It's pretty difficult to find a water resistant mechanical switch keyboard in general, not to mention one so easy to take care of -- so Corsair is setting the K68 apart from the competition in this regard.  

Other Important Features of the Corsair K68

Fully Customizable Macros

Just like Corsair's other keyboards, such as the K95 RGB Platinum, the K68 features fully customizable macros, remapping, and disabling. From text-pasting to fully remapped keys to toggling profiles and modes, the K68 allows for complete user-friendly customization. 

It doesn't have the versatile "G" keys of the K95, though. So if you're an MMO player that needs as many keys as possible to pull off a successful raid, you're going to want to look at the company's other offerings. But for the average MOBA, RTS, or FPS player, the K68's offerings are plentiful. 

N-Key Rollover and Compact Keys

I absolutely love that the K68 offers NKRO, giving me the ability to easily strafe left and forward while throwing a grenade in Battlefield 1 -- all before instantly going prone to crawl toward enemy lines. But the proximity of the K68's keys to one another, coupled with N-Key Rollover, means that I'll sometimes throw an ill-advised ult in Paladins or jump into V.A.T.S. over and over again in Fallout 4.

In the scheme of things, I'm really being nitpicky when it comes to this. But because the K68 is a compact 10-key keyboard, it would have been nice to have a bit more room between keys for my fat cigar fingers. But if you enjoyed the K63 -- or if you're willing to put a little practice into the way you type -- you'll be right at home with the K68 in no time. (It could also be that I'm just a sloppy player, but let's not talk about that ...)  

 

RGB Backlighting

If you've ever used a Corsair product, then you've seen this before. Like the K63, the Corsair K68 provides Red RGB backlighting and pattern customizability through Corsair's CUE software. From Rain to Pulse to Tap-Lighting and Static coloring, you can hone in just the right pattern for looks and functionality. You can even turn the RGB lighting off as a preset if you'd rather have no light at all. 

The only real downside here is that the K68 doesn't provide full-spectrum RGB presets or capabilities. If you don't like red, you'll have to opt for the K68's blue brethren, which have Cherry MX Blue Switches and are only sold in APAC as of this writing. 

Rubber Cable 

This is another nitpicky spot for me. The K68 doesn't provide a braided USB cable, but instead opts for a standard rubber cable. And while the inside functionality of a braided cable isn't decidedly different from that of a typical rubber cable, braided cables do a better job of protecting wires from tangling. They also safeguard against bending stress when wrapping around sharp corners, which does depend on your PC set up. 

I also found that the K68's rubber cable slipped across my desk considerably more than my K95's braided cable. This meant I had less slack on top of my desk to freely move the keyboard when I needed a quick reposition between Overwatch and XCOM 2

Again, it's not a huge deal and is really up to personal preference, but it does feel like a bit of an oversight for a keyboard that offers other incredible functionality. 

The Verdict

Corsair's K68 mechanical gaming keyboard is a nice addition to the company's line of premiere keyboard products. And coming in at $100, it fits snugly between the K63 and K95 Pro RGB in both price and functionality. Its dust and water resistant design differentiates it from both other Corsair keyboards and many keyboards currently on the market. But outside of that, the K68 is essentially the K63 with a numpad

At the end of the day, the Corsair K68 is reliable and competent -- a masterful example of how to implement IPR protections into a sleek keyboard design. And while it doesn't reinvent the wheel for gaming keyboards, especially others found in the Corsair catalog, it's a worthwhile investment if you can't afford the K95 Pro and want a compact, 10-key option. 

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AtGames Announces Fall 2017 Lineup of Classic Gaming Hardware https://www.gameskinny.com/1jp69/atgames-announces-fall-2017-lineup-of-classic-gaming-hardware https://www.gameskinny.com/1jp69/atgames-announces-fall-2017-lineup-of-classic-gaming-hardware https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/a/r/3/ar3620-box-b5a6c.png 1jp69/atgames-announces-fall-2017-lineup-of-classic-gaming-hardware Fri, 09 Jun 2017 16:07:18 -0400 Angelica Dimson

AtGames® Digital Media Ltd., a leading force in interactive entertainment products, has announced their classic gaming hardware lineup for Fall 2017. In partnership with Activision, the Atari Flashback® 8 Gold, Atari Flashback® 8 Classic Game Console, and the Atari Flashback® Portable Game Player were announced in addition to their other latest classic gaming releases: Sega Genesis Flashback, Classic Game Console, and Ultimate Portable Game Player. 

Each of these consoles and portable systems include a fantastic amount of built-in games and innovative features. Plus, a lot of them share the same games -- the only variance being the amount of games that can be on the consoles.

The Atari consoles are slated for release everywhere September 2017 but can be pre-ordered at select retailers in July 2017. While the Sega classic consoles don't have a set release month, they are expected to be in stores everywhere in Fall 2017 and are available for pre-order at select retailers Summer 2017.

Here's what we know so far about each console.

Atari Flashback® 8 Gold

 

  • Features 120 built-in favorite classic games, including Centipede™, Missile Command®, and Frogger.
  • Includes two high performance 2.4 ghz wireless controllers that are styled like the Atari 1600 originals and also two legacy controller ports for optional wired controllers.
  • Features 720p HDMI output, scan line filtering, and a save/pause/rewind feature for every game.
Atari Flashback® 8 Classic Game Console

  • Valued priced edition with 105 all time favorites like Space Invaders and Pitfall!
  • Two styled wired controllers made to look like the 2600 originals, and two legacy controller ports for personal wired controllers.
Atari Flashback® Portable Game Player

  • 70 built-in amazing retro games, including PAC-MAN™ and Kaboom!
  • A built-in rechargeable battery for gamers on-the-go.
  • Can add your own games with an optional SD card.
  • Games can be played on the 2.8" high resolution display or on a TV via an optional cable.
Sega Genesis Flashback

  • Features a new design that is inspired by the original Sega Genesis console.
  • Includes 85 built-in games, such the Mortal Kombat™ series and the Sonic™ series and an integrated cartridge port that plays almost all Sega Genesis and Mega Drive original cartridges.
  • Two high performance 2.4 ghz wireless controllers modeled after the Sega Genesis originals are included, in addition to two legacy ports for optional wired gamepads.
  • Has 720p HDMI output, scan line filtering, and a save/pause/ rewind feature for every game.
Sega Classic Game Console

  • Valued price edition of Sega Genesis Flashback with 81 built in games, such as Shining Force™ and Shining Force II™.
  • Includes two wired controllers modeled after the original Sega Genesis and two legacy controller ports.
Ultimate Portable Game Player

  • Contains 85 built-in Sega Genesis and Mega Drive enhanced games like PAC-PANIC™ and Splatterhouse 2™.
  • Ability to add your own games with an SD card.
  • A built in rechargeable battery for portable gameplay on its high resolution 2.8" display, or on a TV via optional cable.

With all these features and classic games built-in, AtGames is delivering a lot of favorite retro content.

What do you think? Are any of these consoles on your wishlist? Comment below.

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New Logitech G433 and G233 Headsets Hit the Shelves This Month https://www.gameskinny.com/ul903/new-logitech-g433-and-g233-headsets-hit-the-shelves-this-month https://www.gameskinny.com/ul903/new-logitech-g433-and-g233-headsets-hit-the-shelves-this-month https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/l/o/g/logitech-g433-all-colors-8beef.jpg ul903/new-logitech-g433-and-g233-headsets-hit-the-shelves-this-month Thu, 08 Jun 2017 03:15:01 -0400 Valoryan

Today, Logitech announced the release of a new line of headsets, the G233 and the G433. They will both come with a new Logitech audio driver, Pro-G, that “delivers clear highs and lows with minimal distortion.”

These headsets are lightweight and meant to be taken on the go, for listening to high-quality music and playing games.They have mesh ear pads that are breathable and stain-resistant, so they can stand up to the wear and tear of travel. The G433 headset will also come with microfiber ear pads that can be interchanged with the standard mesh ones.

There are currently four color options available for these headsets: Royal Blue, Fire Red, Triple Black, and a special Camo Blue that's sold exclusively through Best Buy in North America. 

The G233 and the G433 will both have removable, noise-canceling boom mics, and are Discord certified to ensure clear communication with your team while gaming. In addition, the G433 will feature DTS Headphone:X® 7.1, allowing for full surround sound and aural positioning. This will let the player to hear games precisely as developers intended, replicating distance and direction for an immersive audio experience.

Both headsets will be compatible with PCs, consoles (including Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and Nintendo Switch), and mobile devices -- and they come with both USB and standard 3.5 mm jack hookups, so that gamers can move seamlessly between sound experiences across all devices.

Logitech plans to have these headsets hitting the shelves later this month. The G433 will be priced at $99.99, and the G233 will be $79.99.

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Should You Be Buying a New Graphics Card Now? https://www.gameskinny.com/o71ya/should-you-be-buying-a-new-graphics-card-now https://www.gameskinny.com/o71ya/should-you-be-buying-a-new-graphics-card-now https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/g/p/u/gpus-317e3.jpg o71ya/should-you-be-buying-a-new-graphics-card-now Wed, 31 May 2017 12:21:47 -0400 blake_1321

If you're a serious PC gamer, sooner or later you will need a new GPU. But is right now the perfect time for buying a new graphics card? With the era of VR at our doorstep, Nvidia was forced to release the Titan Xp. Sure, this amazing GPU is a massive milestone in the industry, but its impact on the current GPU market may be even greater than that.

The emergence of this latest high-end card has caused a drop in prices for all other graphic cards out there. This alone may be the reason why 2017 might be a perfect time for you to rejuvenate your computer and purchase a new graphics card.

Still, this all depends on what kind of graphics card you want to buy, and what price range you can afford. So let's take a look at the three tiers of graphics cards -- entry-level, mid-range, and high-end -- and determine the best picks in each price range, along with the right time to pick them up.

Entry-Level Graphics Cards

Entry-level GPUs are sufficient enough for typical day-to-day usage, HTPC machines, and casual gaming. In recent years we've witnessed a surge of non-GPU intensive games such as League of Legends, DotA 2, CS: GO, and many others -- and these entry-level cards are more than capable of delivering decent framerates at 1080p with high details.

The two best entry-level models out there right now are AMD's RX 550/560 and Nvidia's GTX 1050/1030.

AMD Radeon RX 550/560

RX 560

AMD has an inclination towards re-branding their chips into new generations of graphics cards. This is exactly what happened with Radeon RX 500 series. The fact that they've been using the 14nm process on their Polaris chips for a year gave them the ability to clock them higher out of the box and re-brand them as the RX 500 series.

AMD has unlocked this chip to a full 1024 cores, and clocked it significantly higher. Besides the new RX 560, we also got the RX 550, which is a cut-down version of the RX 460 but with a price tag of just $80 USD.

Nvidia GTX 1050 (Ti)/1030

GTX 1050

Nvidia’s entry-level GTX 1050 and 1050 Ti recently earned a younger (and weaker) brother -- the GTX 1030.

While the 1050 slightly beats AMD's RX 560 in DX11 games, in DX12 it is the other way around. The 1050 Ti is better all-around, but could be considered a bad purchase. Its price hovers around $160 USD -- which is dangerously close to the 20% faster RX 570 that sells at $185 USD.

Verdict

You won’t be making a mistake if you go for either the RX 560 or the GTX 1050. These are priced similarly and are neck-and-neck performance wise. But if you tend to play less graphics-intensive games such as League of Legends or Dota 2 both the RX 550 and GTX 1030 ($80 USD) are a decent purchase as well.

Mid-Range Graphics Cards

The problem with high-end cards is that no matter how good they are, you are not paying just for their performance. You are also paying for the exclusivity to use the newest, most powerful GPU on the market -- especially if that GPU has a clear advantage in game performance.

So people who value high-quality graphics, but are still reluctant to pay more than these devices are worth, are more likely to go with a mid-range GPU, such as the AMD RX 580 or 570, or the Nvidia 1060 or 1070.

Nvidia GTX 1070

GTX 1070

Performance-wise out of the four, the GTX 1070 is far ahead of the rest of the pack -- but it also costs considerably more at around $400. However, the price is directly proportionate to its performance. For twice the price of the RX 470, you get almost twice the performance in games such as The Witcher 3 at 1080p and 1440p. Though this card is borderline high-end, it slid to the mid-range bracket after the release of the 1080 Ti and Titan Xp.

If smooth performance at 1440p with high graphical quality is what you expect from your card, then the GTX 1070 is your best bet.

Nvidia GTX 1060 (+)

GTX 1060

This card is a decent mid-range product which comes in two versions with 3GB and 6GB GDDR5 memory. A few weeks back, Nvidia introduced a refreshed version of the cards, the GTX 1060+, with a 9Ghz clock on the memory. With a price tag of around $250, it is a decent purchase for gaming in 1080p at high detail. To keep smooth framerates at any higher resolution, though, you'd have to compromise on the level of graphical fidelity.

The main drawback with this card is that it doesn't support SLI, and the 3GB model is not suited for gaming in 2017.

RX 580/570

Next up are the RX 580 and the RX 570. Both of the cards pack the same Ellesmere chip on the PCB, with either 4 or 8GB of GDDR5. The difference is that the RX 570 has 256 shader processors (less than its bigger brother), and has lower clock speeds for GPU and memory. In reality, though, those discrepancies translate into single-digit framrate differences. In a 1080p run of The Witcher 3, for example, the RX 580 has 64FPS while the RX 570 manages 58FPS.

Verdict

The absolute champion of this category is the RX 570. The card is just a small percentage slower than the RX 580 and the GTX 1060, but is considerably cheaper. A custom version can be bought for as little as $185 USD.

High-End Graphics Card

GTX 1080 Ti

Finally, there are some people who simply don’t care about the price of their GPU -- all they want is the best possible gaming and graphic experience. Gaming in 4K was hard to imagine a few years ago without several cards stacked in CrossFire or SLI. But now that 4K gaming seems to be the next horizon for the industry, that's changed -- especially with the emergence of single cards that can handle that sort of workload, like Nvidia's GTX 1080Ti and the Titan Xp. 

  GTX 1080 Ti Titan Xp
Shader Units 3584 3584
ROPs 88 96
GPU GP102 GP102
Transistor Count 12B 12B
Memory 11GB 12GB
Bus 352 384
Clock 1480/1582 1418
Memory Clock 1376 1251
Price $699  $1200

 

While there are slight variations in numbers, the performance among these cards is pretty much the same -- which makes the 1080 Ti the best possible high-end purchase at this moment. It will devour any game you throw at it, and do so in stunning 4K. The only real reason to go for the Titan version is if you run neural networks and deal in machine learning.

Should You Wait for New Models to Come Out Before Updating Your Graphics Card?

AMD has announced the official release its Vega based GPUs by the end of June. This particular GPU is something eagerly expected by both gamers worldwide. This particular entry is expected to be a game-changer for graphics processing, which is why it might be worth your while to postpone the purchase of high-end graphics card for at least the next several weeks.

In the end, terms such as ‘better’ and ‘more cost-effective’ are quite subjective. Some people are ready to pay unlimited amounts for even the slightest edge in performance. What card is best for you really boils down to what you really need that GPU to do, and how much you're willing to pay for it. 

]]>
E3 2017: Microsoft Predictions https://www.gameskinny.com/kq2it/e3-2017-microsoft-predictions https://www.gameskinny.com/kq2it/e3-2017-microsoft-predictions https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/2/8/8/2884734-generic2-microsoft-thumbnail-6017e.jpg kq2it/e3-2017-microsoft-predictions Wed, 31 May 2017 09:33:38 -0400 Curtis Dillon

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That wraps up our predictions for Microsoft's E3 2017 showcase. Nothing too crazy, but we're hoping Microsoft really surprises us this year.

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The tech giant has a ton of ground to make up if it wants to keep competing with PlayStation and Nintendo, as its console is currently trailing in sales to PS4, and in mindshare to both. The importance of this E3 for Microsoft cannot be understated -- the company needs to prove to fans that there are new exciting games on the way, and at least a few good reasons to buy the Scorpio.

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I think it would be hyperbolic to say that this is a make-or-break E3 for the Xbox One. The console has still sold very respectably -- but as far as selling the Scorpio and being a part of the console wars conversation again, it's a little less hyperbolic. As the saying goes, "pressure makes diamonds". And E3 2017 will prove if Microsoft crumbles or becomes a diamond.

\n

What can Microsoft do to win gamers hearts at this E3? Would you be happy with a partnership with Oculus? Want to be blown away by the Scorpio? Let us know your thoughts in the comments. 

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Make sure to check out our other E3 predictions: 

\n"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/h/a/l/halo-bde01.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/h/a/l/halo-bde01.jpg","type":"slide","id":"158363","description":"

Halo 6

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Halo 5: Guardians released in October 2015 to a decent reception from fans and critics alike, holding a respectable 84% on Metacritic. That being said, the game didn't sell quite as well as past entries -- and it seems that the adoration and reverence for this series is waning fast. Regardless, it seems all but certain that Microsoft's E3 2017 will close with a trailer for the next installment in the franchise, despite the studio saying it won't make an appearance.

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It was reported a while back that Halo 6 will feature Master Chief as the sole protagonist, with no other playable characters. This comes as a surefire song to the ears of Halo fans everywhere, as the series has often gotten bogged down with secondary characters like Locke. For a while, it even seemed like developer 343i wanted to replace Chief with Locke going forward. Thankfully, it sounds like that idea has been scrapped.

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Halo 6 will definitely make the Xbox's upcoming slate sound a lot better, not to mention it could be a showcase for the graphical power of the Scorpio. 343 Industries has said that Halo 6 will not appear at E3, but developers often lie about these kinds of things, and it's hard to imagine Microsoft not pushing for a CG trailer at the very least.

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Cuphead & ID@Xbox

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Where the hell is Cuphead? That's a question that's been floating around for a couple of years -- and still no answer.

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This highly-anticipated game was revealed at E3 2014, a reported four years into its development (It's worth mentioning that the game started life under the development of two brothers, but now the team consists of almost 20 people).

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Cuphead is a side-scrolling shooter -- like Megaman on steroids, with the art-style of a 1930's cartoon. The game is beautiful and was originally intended to be entirely made up of boss fights. But based on fan adoration, Microsoft decided to fund the developers to make the game significantly larger. So the team set about adding in platforming sections, which have, unfortunately, demoed poorly. Now the game is due for release this year and, surely to God, we will get an official release date at E3.

\n

Aside from Cuphead, the ID@Xbox program will inevitably make a return this year to showcase all of its upcoming indie games. We Happy Few, Below, and Tacoma are just a handful of announced games for the Xbox One, with no full release dates as of yet. These games should be showcased at E3, alongside a handful of exciting new titles to play.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/x/b/o/xbox-one-640x320-7873b.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/x/b/o/xbox-one-640x320-7873b.jpg","type":"slide","id":"158364","description":"

New IPs

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Without a shadow of a doubt -- even more so than the Scorpio reveal -- the most important thing Microsoft can do at this year's E3 is reveal a new IP. The Xbox One needs at least one new game series very, very badly.

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Taking a quick look back, and hindsight being what it is, I think it's fair to say that Microsoft has bungled exclusives all generation long. At first, we had Dead Rising 3, Ryse: Son of Rome, and Forza Motorsport 5 -- all good games, but nothing mind-blowing. Then came the atrocious launch of the Master Chief Collection, the fun Sunset Overdrive, and the promising Titfanfall.

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We didn't know at the time, but Titanfall set a precedent for things to come: Microsoft paid a lot of money for exclusive rights to a game and it ended up selling poorly, thus forcing the developer to put the next game on the PS4 as well. We've seen that happen with Titanfall 2, Rise of the Tomb Raider (kinda), and games from both Insomniac and Remedy.

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The pattern here is very clear: Microsoft doesn't have the resources to develop exclusives and instead pays experienced developers to make games for the Xbox One -- which don't sell well. Microsoft only has a handful of internal development teams, and they have been quite literally forced to work on the same franchises year-in year-out: Halo and Gears of War. On a podcast with IGN this year, Xbox head Phil Spencer admitted that creating a development studio takes a lot of work, money and time, so expecting a talented team to appear from nowhere is unlikely.

\n

On a podcast with IGN this year, Xbox head Phil Spencer admitted that creating a development studio takes a lot of work, money, and time, so expecting a talented team to appear from nowhere is unlikely.What does this mean going forward? It means Microsoft sure-as-hell better have an ace up its sleeve. Should we get a new IP reveal at E3 this year, it's most likely going to be another second-party exclusive that Microsoft paid for. One very possible scenario is a

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One very possible scenario is a Marvel-superheroes game. Marvel has stormed the industry recently, announcing partnerships with Insomniac, Telltale, and Square Enix -- and one of those announcements is a PS4 exclusive Spider-Man game. That partnership could very well lead to a similar deal with Microsoft and a yet-unknown developer. Maybe at E3 Microsoft will reveal an exclusive Iron Man game or X-Men or Fantastic Four. There's a lot of possibilities there.

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Barring any partnership with Marvel, Microsoft needs a new IP that rounds out its exclusive line-up. Right now, it has two shooters and a racing game -- not counting Crackdown, Sea of Thieves, or State of Decay. What does the studio need in order to better compete with Sony? Well, Rise of the Tomb Raider was intended to rival Uncharted, but failed to do so both in commercial success and quality. So the obvious answer is an open-world RPG, akin to Fables or Horizon: Zero Dawn.

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More Details on Games Already Revealed

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This prediction is as safe as can be: We will see more of the games we already know about. Here's a quick rundown of the major games we know about that should make an appearance at Microsoft's big show.

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Forza Motorsport 7
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Over the past several years, the Forza franchise has risen to the pinnacle of the racing genre. But for the first time in years, Gran Turismo is back with a major installment in the series. That doesn't mean there is any real pressure on Forza because the two series are exclusive to their respective consoles. However, It does mean that the spotlight will be on Forza Motorsport 7 for the first time in a while -- but I expect Turn 10 Studios to knock it out of the park.

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Crackdown 3
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Crackdown 3 was revealed two years ago, and we haven't seen anything of it since Gamescom that year. Based on the history of Xbox One games being revealed only to then disappear, this is a little worrisome. Generally, this absence can mean one of three things:

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    \n
  1. The game had barely started development when it was shown at E3.
  2. \n
  3. The game is almost finished and it's being saved for a quick release.
  4. \n
  5. The game is in trouble and it's being hidden.
  6. \n
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Each of these scenarios are equally plausible, and perhaps Microsoft has been saving Crackdown to really showcase the power of the Scorpio. However, if Crackdown skips this E3 as well, you should probably know that it's on the chopping board. Regardless, we will know soon.

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Sea of Thieves
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Sea of Thieves is an upcoming pirate-MMO from Rare. This game was also revealed at E3 2015 and was lauded as a return-to-form for the ex-Banjo Kazooie developer. Hands-on impressions of the game have been positive but it's difficult to see the game being a big success. That being said, it seems an open beta could be announced at E3 2017, as well as a nice new gameplay clip -- and hopefully a release date.

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State of Decay 2
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State of Decay 2 is going to be a big deal. Of all the Xbox One games on this list, State of Decay 2 is by far the most exciting. The original State of Decay was a great video game, albeit with a few issues that held it back. This is the reason I expect the sequel to be a fantastic game that builds upon the best elements of the original.

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The original title is probably the closest you can get to a true The Walking Dead/zombie survival experience. Undead Labs has hopefully fixed a lot of the bugs from the first game while introducing new gameplay mechanics and better graphics. And that's about all State of Decay 2 needs to be.

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Frankly, Microsoft does not have a lot of great games on its roster right now. In fact, I can't recall any time when the Xbox's upcoming slate was this poor. The system badly needs a big new game, especially considering both Halo and Gears of War are no longer the mega-selling franchises they used to be. And with Sony nabbing high-performing exclusives like Horizon Zero Dawn and Nioh, Microsoft really needs to step up its game. 

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A Full Scorpio Reveal

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This reveal is the only certainty heading into Microsoft's E3 showcase -- but it's also the most newsworthy, and arguably the most important. Just what is Project Scorpio? Well, it sounds like a lot more than a high-powered Xbox One.

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Based solely on the innards of the machine, the Scorpio is a next-generation console. However, Microsoft has stressed that it won't have exclusive games, thus making it a machine that merely improves visuals and load times for current gen games. And that begs the question: Why does it need to exist? As is the case with the PS4 Pro, if the Scorpio is solely for visual enhancement, then it becomes a baffling waste of resources.

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There are two alternative scenarios here: 

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1. Microsoft is lying and the power will be used by developers, eventually leading to the standard Xbox One games running poorly and becoming obsolete. If you create a super powerful machine and developers create games for it, then attempt to scale it way down to work on the original Xbox One, chances are the game will not work properly. This happened with Hyrule Warriors on Nintendo 3DS and the New Nintendo 3DS - it ran very poorly on the older hardware, despite Nintendo saying that would never be the case.

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2. All that extra power is secretly for use with Oculus VR. It's no secret that Microsoft has a partnership with Oculus, and all the extra power in the Scorpio could be used to make the Xbox One the best place to play the Oculus. Should that be the case, I think there will be a large amount of disappointed Xbox fans, especially considering Oculus is, so far, the least viable VR platform.

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What the machine is, and its purpose, will be revealed sooner rather than later, along with an official release date and price. The latter is also a huge matter for Microsoft and fans -- considering the specs, conventional wisdom puts the price tag around $499 (at best), which makes it twice as expensive as its closest competitor. Microsoft is in a huge bind when it comes to revealing the Scorpio, which makes E3 all the more exciting.

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We're a month away from E3, so it's high time we start getting hyped beyond any reasonable measure! All month long we will be making some predictions for each of the big E3 conferences, from Nintendo to Sony and beyond. Thankfully, Ubisoft managed to reveal their entire conference in a recent financial earnings call, so they've done that job for us.

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Today, we're talking Microsoft! Heading into E3 2017, Microsoft's conference is without a doubt the most shrouded in mystery. With a huge console upgrade on the way and precious few AAA games to go along with it (for now), Microsoft should have a lot to bring to show-and-tell. That being said, Microsoft's conferences can also be somewhat predictable -- most of the time.

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That's where this type of prognostication comes in. We'll be making a handful of (fairly) safe, yet bankable, predictions to give you an idea of what you can expect from the upcoming conference. Microsoft has a lot riding on this year's E3, having fallen so far behind the PS4 and losing a ton of the remaining mindshare to Nintendo. So we're hoping the company comes out guns-a-blazing! 

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Logitech G Pro Gaming Keyboard Review: A Great Thing in a Small Package https://www.gameskinny.com/fybgb/logitech-g-pro-gaming-keyboard-review-a-great-thing-in-a-small-package https://www.gameskinny.com/fybgb/logitech-g-pro-gaming-keyboard-review-a-great-thing-in-a-small-package https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/l/o/g/logitech-pro-gaming-keyboard-30ed3.jpg fybgb/logitech-g-pro-gaming-keyboard-review-a-great-thing-in-a-small-package Tue, 09 May 2017 16:40:58 -0400 Auverin Morrow

My gaming desk is decked out with Logitech peripherals -- my favorite of which is my G900 Chaos Spectrum mouse. So when I had the opportunity to get my hands on their newest entry in their gaming line, the G Pro tenkeyless mechanical keyboard, I jumped on the chance. 

This keyboard was designed from the ground up for eSports players. And it's no surprise since the tech giant is a sponsor for Team SoloMid; the development team behind the G Pro worked alongside professional gamers to create a peripheral that balances comfort and performance with a diminutive size that will equally suit a pro-LAN setup and a small desk at home. 

Specs for the Logitech G Pro

The Logitech G Pro uses its namesake's proprietary Romer-G mechanical switches. These custom switches are designed to have both short actuation distance and low actuation force, which means this keyboard packs some of the fastest response you'll find on any mechanical switch in the market. These switches have tested for a lifetime of 70 million key presses, so they'll withstand just about any amount of stress you put them under. 

While it has all the standard keys you'd expect from a keyboard -- including extra keys to toggle game mode and lighting -- this keyboard doesn't have the 10 keys that normally take up the right side of the board. That means it's significantly smaller than your standard gaming keyboard. The unit itself measures 153mm by 360.5mm, or 6 inches by 14.2 inches. That makes it small enough for pretty much any space -- even my cramped little corner desk.

Even though the keyboard itself isn't wireless, its braided USB cable is detachable so that it's easier to travel with -- a clear nod toward those eSports players who are going to spend all their time on the road to hit LANs

Last but not least, the Logitech G Pro also features fully customizable RGB lighting. And when I say fully customizable, I mean it. The newest iteration of the Logitech G software that powers this keyboard allows you to not only control the color of each key, but also allows you to create and edit your own dynamic effects. So if you want to make rainbows dance across each key anytime you pop your ultimate key in game, you can do just that. 

Beutiful Performance from a Well-Made Keyboard

I tested this keyboard in a number of SMITE games, ESO dungeons, and in my everyday writing and editing for the GameSkinny site. And it handled everything beautifully. 

This keyboard feels as sleek as it looks. The key caps offer good grip inside its brushed metal chassis, and the response from each key press was as immediate as it was satisfying. Each key sits high enough that it's nearly impossible to accidentally press two at once, which makes a serious difference when you're in the heat of battle. 

For day-to-day typing, the G Pro works well enough. Like any mechanical keyboard, it's not going to let you fly across keys at breakneck speeds without missing a few letters here and there. But even so, this is the only gaming keyboard I've typed on that has actuation speeds and distances which can actually keep up with how quickly I tend to type when I get on a roll. 

Aside from its stellar response in and out of game, my favorite thing about the G Pro is its size. As I mentioned earlier, I work out of a very cramped desk in a small office nook. Between my two monitors, my keyboard, and all the geeky knick-knacks that populate my workspace, there's rarely enough room for my mouse to get the full range of movement it needs to get those killer snipe shots in Paladins

But that's not the case with this keyboard. Without those ten keys -- which I rarely use anyway and didn't miss much when they were gone -- the size of the G Pro is perfect. The extra space it gave me to move my mouse around really helped me out in-game. Not once in my SMITE games did I miss a skillshot or run into an enemy ultimate because my mouse was colliding with my keyboard. And it felt so, so good. 

The G Pro's Software is Excellent, Too. 

I've always loved Logitech's customization software. I use it often for my Chaos Spectrum, and I was excited to get to do a little bit more with it than I have with other Logitech peripherals. 

I sank more time than I'm willing to admit messing around with the custom effects and lighting patterns. It can be a little time-consuming until you get the hang of how everything works, but it's tons of fun to play around with. And it was nice to have basically endless options at my fingertips any time I wanted to bring a fresh look to my keyboard. 

The customization options that are available with the hundreds of game profiles attached to Logitech's PC game database are pretty cool, too. You can get this keyboard to do all kinds of cool stuff in-game -- like light up different colors to let you know your League of Legends match has started, or flash bright red when an enemy is hitting you with an ultimate. 

The ability to turn off certain keys when you activate game mode is also a huge boon that often goes overlooked. Personally, my pint-sized pinky finger has trouble hitting the Tab key instead of Caps Lock when trying to pop my ultimate. Being able to turn the Caps key off entirely doesn't solve my own shortcomings as a gamer, but it does keep me from wasting a valuable ultimate on a single bad key press. 

Verdict

The Logitech G Pro is an all-around great keyboard. It feels nice to use and comes with a ton of customization features that can help you tailor your experience to whatever you want it to be. And it packs a lot of high performance and typing prowess into a small, sleek body that doesn't take up any more room than it needs to. Whether you're an aspiring eSports pro or just a gamer with a limited amount of desk space and an eye for good peripherals, the G Pro should be right up your alley. 

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Full of Stars: Code to Access the Forgotten Temple https://www.gameskinny.com/sryy7/full-of-stars-code-to-access-the-forgotten-temple https://www.gameskinny.com/sryy7/full-of-stars-code-to-access-the-forgotten-temple https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/t/e/m/temple-af860.png sryy7/full-of-stars-code-to-access-the-forgotten-temple Sun, 07 May 2017 20:42:02 -0400 Paige McGovern

If you've made it this far in the space flight game Full of Stars, you should be proud of yourself. You're almost to the Blue Sector!

The Forgotten Temple is one of the last destinations you and your crew will reach in your escape from the intergalactic war. Your crew is skeptical that the temple has anything of value inside. But you know that the Forgotten Temple is worth exploring. Here, you'll unlock a new achievement, gain more resources, and get one step closer to a new home on a safe planet.

Read on to learn how to get there, and most importantly -- how to get inside.

How to Get to the Forgotten Temple in Full of Stars

If you haven't gotten to the Forgotten Temple yet, you can. Starting from Quantum Comms Station, travel either to the corporate battlefield, Vivid Nebula (hard), or Tortuga Station (very hard).

  • From the corporate battlefield, travel to the space telescope (hard), which is the key to finding the mysterious Blue Sector. From there, travel to the Forgotten Temple.
  • From Vivid Nebula, you can travel straight to the Forgotten Temple. This is the most direct route. You won't need to travel to the space telescope.
  • From Tortuga Station, you can either travel to the space telescope or Vivid Nebula. Both destinations will lead you to the temple.

When you arrive, you'll see the doors to the temple are shut tight, with no chance of budging.

How to Access the Forgotten Temple in Full of Stars

Once you get to the Forgotten Temple, you'll need to:

  • Take a good look at the temple doors.
    • There's a mark above the door in Morse code: II..II.I.. You wonder if the door will open if it receives coded radio transmission of this code.
    • Note: Your mark may be different than the one I've provided.
    • Pushing the doors doesn't work, so choose this option instead.
  • Choose your transmission.
    • If your mark is different, know that every I should be 1, and every dot 0.
    • Translate the code accordingly.

Here's the transmission for the Morse code above:

1100110100

Remember that your code will be different if the mark above the temple door is different. Choose the option that correctly resembles your mark.

Here's another example: .III.IIII. Your transmission for this code would be 0111011110.

Once inside the temple, you'll be able to find the sleeping people and unlock the Wake Up People from Cryogenic Sleep achievement. You'll also gain 1,000 idium if you search the urns in exchange for seven leadership points.

How to Complete the Cryogenic Sleep Achievement

Once you're inside the temple, you'll need to:

  • Go to the main altar.
  • Look around when you get closer.
  • You'll see chambers with human corpses, and green vapor surrounding them. Decide to inspect the chambers.
  • You'll realize the corpses aren't corpses after all. Open the chambers for 300 idium.
  • As they slowly start waking from their sleep, try to talk to them.
  • You'll tell them about either the war or the Blue Sector. They'll go into hysterics. To convince everyone to board your ship, be gentle.

Congratulations! You've unlocked the achievement and gained new passengers. 

When you're finished copying down data from the main altar, you'll travel to Heaven's Gate, the only available destination. Who knows what's waiting for you there...

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For more Full of Stars tips and tricks, follow GameSkinny and check out our other guides:

Happy exploring!

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Corsair Glaive RGB Review: A Responsive, Accurate Addition to a Growing Catalog of Quality https://www.gameskinny.com/f2838/corsair-glaive-rgb-review-a-responsive-accurate-addition-to-a-growing-catalog-of-quality https://www.gameskinny.com/f2838/corsair-glaive-rgb-review-a-responsive-accurate-addition-to-a-growing-catalog-of-quality https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/g/l/a/glaive-rgb-reviewers-guide-final-b3fc4.jpg f2838/corsair-glaive-rgb-review-a-responsive-accurate-addition-to-a-growing-catalog-of-quality Thu, 04 May 2017 09:03:21 -0400 Jonathan Moore

The more Corsair products I use, the more I’m convinced the company is completely in tune with its core demographic – gamers. A cursory glance at Corsair’s rapidly expanding catalog of gaming mice is a testament to that. From the Harpoon RGB to the Scimitar RGB Pro, Corsair mice offer myriad bells and whistles with the reliability and durability both competitive and casual gamers demand.

Its latest offering, the Glaive RGB, is no different. Built for speed and precision, the Glaive is no doubt a mechanically sound and efficient gaming mouse. Coming in at $69.99, the Glaive’s price point nestles snugly between the M65 Pro and Scimitar Pro RGB and provides gamers with a suite of features from both mice. But don’t worry; it brings a few new tricks of its own to the game, too.

It may not be the absolute best mouse in Corsair’s expanding line (although that’s still up for debate), but it undeniably fills a niche and provides a wonderful experience on multiple fronts.

Looks and Swagger: The Glaive RGB is a Beautiful Piece of Hardware

We’ll get to specs in just a second, but I want to first talk about how gorgeous this mouse is. The Glaive RGB is the most strikingly elegant mouse in Corsair’s line. Its sleek, contoured design is accentuated by sharp cuts and angles near the front, which lend it a mechanical look from that angle. More so than its brethren, the Glaive RGB looks sophisticated and futuristic – it’s not as clunky looking as the M65 Pro, but provides much more visual pop than the Harpoon RGB or Katar.

On top of that, the Glaive employs the same 3-zone RGB backlighting customization that Corsair uses in many of their other mice and keyboards. That means by using Corsair’s CUE customization software (which keeps getting better and better, by the way), you can fully customize the color on the Glaive, from the light strips on either side of the mouse to the Glaive’s grills across the front and the Corsair logo emblazoned on the aft of the mouse.

I know it’s odd to say, but the Glaive carries with it an aura of class. It’s not trying to do too much, but it’s also making a statement: Bright and flashy aesthetics don’t always mean gaudy and fantastic button arrangements.

Unboxing the Glaive 

As with all Corsair products, the Glaive comes packaged in sturdy box that doubles as a quick and easy-to-use carrying case. In addition to the mouse and a user manual inside, Corsair also provides three interchangeable thumb grips that offer gamers a trio of tailored fits for increased comfort during gameplay. What I especially like about these grips is that each easily snaps onto and off of the left side of the mouse with minimal effort. Unlike other mice, you won’t need any tools, making substitution on the fly effortless, even during fierce multiplayer matches. 

What’s more, I found that each grip provided a different benefit, depending on the game I was playing. The thumb rest variant proved beneficial for slower games like Ark: Survival Evolved and Subnautica, where quick movements were few and far between. But the more traditional rubberized thumb grip offered added control for twitch shooters like Counter Strike: Global Offensive. The third variant, a conventionally smooth thumb grip often found on other mice, proved a bit slick for my personal taste. But nonetheless, its inclusion affords players a viable third option.

The mouse features standard L/R buttons, Omron switches guaranteed to last 50 million clicks, two shoulder buttons, a middle column button with an aluminum, rubber-grip, clickable scroll wheel, DPI cycling button, and a durable braided cable.

Functionality & Feedback: Where the Glaive Really Shines

The Glaive provides some of the best accuracy and stability of any mouse I’ve ever used. In Paladins, I was able to pull off monster headshots and crits with Victor and Tyra, taking my game from a typical 20-12 to an average of 32-8 over 10 or so matches – a massive upswing in performance. And it was because the Glaive is so responsive.

I won’t lie: the Glaive took some getting used to. As I’ve said in other reviews, my every-day mouse is a wireless Razer Type-R II, and while it’s a great mouse for my needs on a regular basis, it’s not nearly as responsive as its wired counterparts -- like the Glaive. So there was a bit of a (re)learning curve when it came to Glaive, but it didn’t take long to slip back in those comfortable Corsair shoes.

The Glaive’s Buttons are Airy, but Responsive

The L/R buttons on the Glaive are light and tad bit airy, but hyper-reactive nonetheless. That means I was able to click them as fast as I could and they responded over and over again, which came in handy in more than one firefight. But the great thing about the Glaive’s new Omron switches is that they’re not only responsive, but they’re micro-contact gap means they’re also accurate. Given their slight airiness, it wouldn’t be surprising if I made a few accidental clicks here and there, but that never happened in my more than 30 hours with the Glaive.

On top of that, one of my favorite things about the Glaive is how big the L/R buttons actually are. Taking into consideration a plethora of grip styles, both traditional and hybrid, the Glaive’s left mouse button is clickable from the front of the mouse all the way up to the top of the DPI selector light-rail. On the other side, the Glaive’s right mouse button is clickable nearly to the back of the mouse – more than ¾ down the side. This feature really comes in handy if you’re working or playing in a confined space and need to change your grip as you move the mouse around.

Where the L/R buttons feel well-made, the Glaive’s shoulder buttons carry an economic feel. Regardless, they are just as responsive as the L/R buttons, requiring only the slightest touch to activate. And just like the L/R buttons, these shoulder buttons took a bit of getting used to. Where the shoulder buttons on my Razer Type-R II require a methodical push to activate that sometimes compromises my grip on the mouse, the Glaive’s larger shoulder buttons are decidedly more sensitive and easier to find.

Rolling your thumb up from the thumb rest and pushing slightly in will easily activate the buttons. And while the shoulder buttons aren’t so responsive that an accidental touch will activate them, they are responsive enough that a light press that doesn’t compromise your grip most certainly will.

The Glaive’s rubber-gripped aluminum scroll wheel feels nice and is positioned high enough that you’ll never accidentally click the L/R or DPI cycle buttons while scrolling. It’s accurate enough that switching weapons in Battlefield 1 was a breeze, but it’s not as fast as I’d hoped for. Scrolling through web pages took a few more spins of the wheel than I’m typically used to. The button beneath the scroll wheel is a bit awkward, too, but considering how all scroll-wheel buttons are a bit awkward, the Glaive’s falls in the more user-friendly end of the spectrum.

And lastly, the Glaive’s DPI cycling button is placed nicely enough, although moving to it can be cumbersome at times, especially if you’re a palm-grip player. Outside of that, it’s a responsive button that allows you to quickly cycle through the Glaive’s five available DPI settings, all of which are customizable using Corsair’s CUE software (the stock DPI settings are 800; 1,500; 3,000; 6,000; and 9,000). What I do really like about the Glaive – on top of mostly everything else – is the DPI selector light-rail, which is a nice user experience touch, providing easy and quick reference for which DPI setting I’m actually using. It’s not a big deal, per se, but it’s definitely one I appreciate more than I thought I would. 

The Glaive’s Sensor is Damn Good

 

Much like Corsair’s Scimitar RGB Pro, the Glaive uses a custom pixart sensor that brings high-performance and crazy-reliable accuracy right to your desktop. Where all of Corsair’s other gaming mice – sans the Scimitar – only go up to about 12,000 DPI, the Glaive is able to hit that elusive 16,000 DPI setting for ultra-speedy sniping or radically precise movements in the RTS and MOBA space.

On top of that, the Glaive also allows users to fully customize their DPI settings from 100 to 16,000, settable at 1DP steps, allowing the Glaive to be fine tuned to any mousepad or surface type. Accentuating this is CUE’s ability to calibrate the Glaive to any play surface as well.

Typically, I play without a mousepad on a less-than-optimal desk covered in divots and scratches from years of moving (yeah, I need a new desk …). But the problem I often run into is that the sensor on my Razer Type-R II sometimes gets lost in the maelstrom, causing my cursor (and avatar) to freeze while I turn the mouse off and on – or frantically shake it until it comes back to life.

But with the Glaive, it doesn’t matter that I’m lazy and won’t get a mousepad – or that my desk has seen better days. Instead, I’m able to calibrate the Glaive in CUE and get continued and reliable response from the sensor day in and day out. And that feels really good.

Lastly, the polling rate for the Glaive is pretty insane. When Corsair claims that the Glaive provides “ultrafast 1ms lag-free game play” they really mean it. The Glaive executes your actions precisely and with minimal delay. Where a typical non-gaming mouse will send a signal to the PC about every 8 milliseconds, the Glaive sends a 1,000Hz signal every single millisecond, meaning that your movements, no matter how rapid, are registered for high-precision, which really makes a difference in those to-the-fire firefights in Paladins.

Comfort

Corsair stresses that they put a lot of emphasis and comfortability with the Glaive – and there’s no doubt they did. But I can’t help but feel a little disappointed in that arena. Sure, the Glaive’s uniquely contoured and sculpted chassis fits myriad grip styles, but its slick surface sometimes makes these grip styles uncomfortable or obtuse.

I’m a palm player and while it took some time to get used to how high my hand rests on the Glaive compared to even the Scimitar Pro RGB, the one thing I couldn’t quite get over was how slippery the Glaive felt – specifically with the thumb-rest grip. In that configuration, I often felt my palm slipping up and down, which caused me to grip the mouse harder and my hand to get fatigued.

Ultimately, I remedied the situation by switching to another thumb-grip (thank you, Corsair for providing more than one). But I can’t help but think that while the Glaive’s finish provides for increased ease-of-movement, it was a bit of an oversight to make it so slick.

But overall, the Glaive RGB is a fantastic feeling mouse that may make claw-grippers feel more at home, but is suited for gamers of all grip styles. Even after 30 hours of play and a few 8-hour marathon sessions, my hand never got tired once I found my optimal configuration.

Verdict

Corsair’s Glaive RGB is a highly responsive, low-latency mouse that provides moderate to high comfortability an incredibly versatile set of grip styles. It’s reliable and accurate with a powerful and consistent sensor that expertly performs on numerous surfaces. It’s a mouse that delivers on nearly all of its promises and doesn’t pretend to be something it’s not.

Coming into Corsair’s peripheral catalog between the M65 Pro and Scimitar RGB Pro, the Glaive combines into a responsive and elegant package a lot of what makes those mice great. At $69.99, the Glaive is one of the more comfortable mice in its price range – and it provides the precision and functionality of a mouse that carries double the price.

The Glaive RGB isn’t the best gaming mouse on the market, but it isn’t claiming to be. It’s lightweight frame and precise angle snapping make it ideal for FPS players, while it's fully customizable DPI settings let RTS and MOBA players dial in the accuracy they need to move across the battlefield. At the end of the day, the Glaive provides a well-made reliable product to competitive and casual gamers who are looking for quality without breaking the bank.

And that’s just something you can’t argue with.

Note: Corsair provided a Glaive RGB model for review.

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RBT, The Carpal Tunnel Relieving Mouse, Has Met Half Its Goal With a Month to Go https://www.gameskinny.com/y7gck/rbt-the-carpal-tunnel-relieving-mouse-has-met-half-its-goal-with-a-month-to-go https://www.gameskinny.com/y7gck/rbt-the-carpal-tunnel-relieving-mouse-has-met-half-its-goal-with-a-month-to-go https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/57fa3974d4a02ad81c0211566dc1b074.jpg y7gck/rbt-the-carpal-tunnel-relieving-mouse-has-met-half-its-goal-with-a-month-to-go Wed, 03 May 2017 17:56:02 -0400 ThatGamersAsylum

Created by QuadraClicks Gaming, the RBT- Original Rebel mouse has just crossed over the halfway point as it strides towards its $5,000 goal on IndieGoGo with roughly a month left to donate. The RBT mouse was developed to relieve and prevent the effects of hand cramping and carpal tunnel experienced by gamers or anyone that uses a mouse frequently over long periods of time.

According to the campaign page:

Our patented Right 'Bove Touch design makes maneuver and click rate faster and reduces pains associated with using the conventional mouse. The RBTs - Original Rebel defies all existing mouse ergonomics in today's market. After 4 years of research & development, we are convinced that, RBTs, are the ultimate computing ideal for gaming enthusiasts, badass designers, and everyday Workaholics.

That being said, the mouse is intended to be fully usable to play competitive games, such as Overwatch, League of Legends, or SMITE. It was created by a gamer, after all. Investing $150 dollars will net you the mouse, which is a 62.5% discount from its $240 projected retail price. While this is oddly the lowest tier that you can back while receiving an award, you can donate regardless. 

You can read more about the process of its creation and intended uses here on GameSkinny as detailed by the creator himself. 

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7 Surprisingly Good MMORPGs on Android https://www.gameskinny.com/pd0m0/7-surprisingly-good-mmorpgs-on-android https://www.gameskinny.com/pd0m0/7-surprisingly-good-mmorpgs-on-android https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/a/n/d/android-d5d3a.jpg pd0m0/7-surprisingly-good-mmorpgs-on-android Mon, 01 May 2017 08:00:01 -0400 Paige McGovern

[{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/fd7aa8e954f2a720fc03ddb8f24faabf.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/fd7aa8e954f2a720fc03ddb8f24faabf.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"10799","description":"

Albion Online

\n
    \n
  • Developer: Sandbox Interactive
  • \n
  • Business Model: Buy to Play
  • \n
  • Required: Android 5.0+, 7" screen tablet, ARMv7 (Cortex), Atom CPU OpenGL ES, 2.0 support or higher, 2 GB RAM or more
  • \n
  • Download Link
  • \n
  • Official Website
  • \n
\n
What It Offers
\n

All characters are classless in this medieval cross-platform MMO. Your equipment determines who you are and what you will become.

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What Makes It Good
\n

Albion Online features a completely player-driven economy with PvP battles of varying sizes. There are hundreds of territories that guilds must compete for. Since the game is cross-platform, all players can interact with one another, making this a truly satisfying MMO experience.

\n

----

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What do you think about these 7 Android MMOs? Are you playing any? Let us know in the comments!

\n

And while you're searching these games, check out our other list on more mobile MMOs you should download right now.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/760a07f02b2b1c8c3b02a57fa8cf6fb1.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/760a07f02b2b1c8c3b02a57fa8cf6fb1.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"10798","description":"

Toram Online

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    \n
  • Developer: Asobimo, Inc.
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  • Business Model: Free; offers In-App Purchases
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  • Required: Android 2.3+
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  • Rating: 4.2 stars
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  • Download Link
  • \n
  • Official Website
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What It Offers
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This is another action MMO by Asobimo, Inc. Play and fight in multiple maps or an open world. Asobimo delivers again with great story missions, graphics, and landscapes.

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What Makes It Good
\n

Toram Online has much more customization variety than most MMOs, both in character appearance and equipment. You can build your own houses and own pets in this adventure, or you can focus only on your character and choose the skills and stats that are unique to you.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/adec66a39656e52f1d8d87a8fb46af52.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/adec66a39656e52f1d8d87a8fb46af52.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"10797","description":"

Arcane Legends

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    \n
  • Developer: Spacetime Games
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  • Business Model: Free; offers In-App Purchases
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  • Required: Android 2.3.3+
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  • Rating: 4.4 stars
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  • Download Link
  • \n
  • Official Website
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What It Offers
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This fantasy action MMO offers superb graphics, decent storyline and questing, and weekly and seasonal events. In addition, there's player housing, which isn't seen too much in mobile MMOs. 

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What Makes It Good
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While there aren't a lot of classes, Arcane Legends makes up for this flaw by its multiple PvP modes and mystical pet collection system.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/d772603be2eba0cf9da5a54d2856a76e.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/d772603be2eba0cf9da5a54d2856a76e.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"10796","description":"

Aurcus Online

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    \n
  • Developer: Asobimo, Inc.
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  • Business Model: Free; offers In-App Purchases
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  • Required: Android 2.3+
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  • Rating: 4.4 stars
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  • Download Link
  • \n
  • Official Website
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What It Offers
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This is another mobile MMORPG by Asobimo, Inc. Its graphics are simple yet beautiful for a mobile device. Fight against enemies of all kinds and build up your combos in this action-packed game.

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What Makes It Good
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Players can participate in open world PvP battles with their friends. Combat is skill-based and challenging. Although players can opt to pay for a subscription, players assure that this game is not pay to win and truly delivers the MMO experience to small screens.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/c79723726a9395406df5210475ea4fe8.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinny/c79723726a9395406df5210475ea4fe8.jpg","type":"youtube","id":"10800","description":"

Order & Chaos 

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    \n
  • Developer: Gameloft
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  • Business Model: Free; offers In-App Purchases
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  • Required: Android 3.0+
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  • Rating: 4.3 stars
  • \n
  • Download Link
  • \n
  • Official Website
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What It Offers
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Choose your race, class, and talent. Thousands of skills are at your disposal. Join a guild or create your own. Choose the pet or mount of your choice.

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What Makes It Good
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This is an old-school style MMO that resembles vanilla World of Warcraft for many players. The world is massive and completely open. The dungeons are praised highly.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/d/u/n/dungeon-8c47b.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/d/u/n/dungeon-8c47b.jpg","type":"slide","id":"157733","description":"

Dungeon Hunter 5

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    \n
  • Developer: Gameloft
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  • Business Model: Free; offers In-App Purchases
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  • Required: Android 4.0+
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  • Rating: 4.2 stars
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  • Download Link
  • \n
  • Official Website
  • \n
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What It Offers
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Dungeon Hunter 5 is a hack-n-slash MMO that features a fantastic story, powerful dungeons, and a large variety of weapons and armor to choose from. Defend your goods or raid others' strongholds.

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What Makes It Good
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Graphics are stunning and game play is smooth for a mobile MMO. You won't easily get bored in this game. Immerse yourself in the single player story mission experience, or compete against others in the Stronghold mode. Earn resources to upgrade your stronghold and become the strongest warrior in the land.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/a/v/a/avabek-2b576.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/a/v/a/avabek-2b576.jpg","type":"slide","id":"157732","description":"

Avabel Online

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    \n
  • Developer: Asobimo, Inc.
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  • Business Model: Free; offers In-App Purchases
  • \n
  • Required: Android 2.3+
  • \n
  • Rating: 4.2 stars
  • \n
  • Download Link
  • \n
  • Official Website
  • \n
\n
What It Offers
\n

Starting off as a classless character, the player must make their way up in power and choose their own path in this beautiful 3D action MMO. Experience many quests, dungeons, and PvP combat. 

\n
What Makes It Good
\n

Classes aren't fixed and can be changed at any time. Combat is fast and fluid. For an older game, there's still an active player base. Avabel Online is fun and easy to pick up whether you're a veteran to the mobile MMO scene or just getting started.

"},{"image":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/a/n/d/android-d5d3a.jpg","thumb":"http://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_85,w_97/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/a/n/d/android-d5d3a.jpg","type":"slide","id":"157739","description":"

When most people think of an MMORPG, they don't think about the mobile market. In fact, the mention of a mobile MMO may be enough to drive interested players away.

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Gamers are concerned that a mobile MMO can't deliver the features and player base that a "traditional" MMO can. Are they right? I don't think so.

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It's time to challenge that idea. Here are 7 MMORPGS on Android that will change the way you look at the mobile MMO market.

"}]]]>
First Ever Photos Revealed for the Xbox: Project Scorpio Developer Kit & Hardware Break Down https://www.gameskinny.com/uz1an/first-ever-photos-revealed-for-the-xbox-project-scorpio-developer-kit-hardware-break-down https://www.gameskinny.com/uz1an/first-ever-photos-revealed-for-the-xbox-project-scorpio-developer-kit-hardware-break-down https://res.cloudinary.com/lmn/image/upload/c_limit,h_360,w_640/e_sharpen:100/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto/v1/gameskinnyc/h/e/a/header-image-ab8a7.jpg uz1an/first-ever-photos-revealed-for-the-xbox-project-scorpio-developer-kit-hardware-break-down Thu, 13 Apr 2017 05:09:21 -0400 Dan Roemer

The Xbox One originally released in late 2013 and is now seeing its first major upgrade, similar to the PlayStation 4 Pro system released last year, known for now as “Project Scorpio” -- Gamasutra were able to get a first look and photos of the system's brand-new developer kit. Today I'll be breaking down all the juicy details and highlights from their coverage, starting things off with the actual specs of the development kit and retail models.

Notably the developer kits have a bit more juice under the hood outside of the CPU, featuring a GPU with 44 CUs (Compute Units) @1172 MHz (Megahertz) with a clock speed of 6.6 TFLOPS (Floating Point Operations Per Second) with 24GB GDDR5 RAM, a 1TB hard drive with an additional 1TB solid state hard drive and an optical disc drive with 4K UHD Blu-Ray support.

The retail model will have a GPU at 40 CUs @1172 MHz with a clock speed of 6.0 TFLOPS, with 12GB GDDR5 RAM, 1TB hard drive and will also have the 4K UHD Blu-Ray support and optical disc drive.

Comparing this to the Xbox One, Xbox One S, and even the PlayStation 4 Pro -- it's a huge upgrade in terms of raw power on the GPU side of things.

For perspective PlayStation Pro's GPU runs with 36 CUs @911MHz at a clock speed of roughly 4.12 TFLOPS. The Project Scorpio will also be boasting almost 50% more memory with its 12GB GDDR5 RAM @326GB/s compared to the PlayStation 4 Pro's 8GB GDDR5 RAM @218GB/s.

Project Scorpio will also incorporate DX12 support, speaking with Gamasutra, Kevin Gammill (Microsoft’s group program manager for Xbox Core Platform) -- had this to say,

“It's the first time I'm aware of us ever doing something like this,” Gammill said. “We actually pulled some of the DX12 run time components directly into the hardware. So basically, these high-frequency DX12 draw calls you'd normally call [to output a frame, for example] which would take up a lot of GPU and CPU cycles, now that that's baked into the system itself, it makes the system significantly more efficient.”

Developer feedback was also given on the previous hardware's 8GB DDR3 ESRAM and was replaced entirely with 12GB GDDR5 RAM -- speaking to Gamasutra,

“This was feedback we got from developers, that targeting ESRAM was harder, so we wanted to not make that an additional challenge,” he said. “The other thing we heard is that they wanted more headroom for their titles, so we moved from 5 gigs of RAM to 8.”

Xbox, Project Scorpio

Microsoft will be shipping out developer kits of the Project Scorpio in the coming weeks, they'll also be able to replicate both Xbox One and Xbox One S developer kits. The kit will feature a real-time clock and battery back up, an OLED screen with navigation buttons on the front of the box and five programmable buttons. (So for example if you're working with a Project Scorpio developer kit, you'll be able to set up the OLED screen to display useful information such as frame rate, GPU or CPU usage, etc.)

They'll feature the same ports as the retail Project Scorpio, but with have three additional front-facing USB ports, an extra NIC (network interface card), and will also sport vents on the back and sides as opposed to the top, this way developers can conveniently stack multiple developer kits without having to worry about overheating issues.

Xbox, Project Scorpio, Stacked

Speaking to Gamasutra:

“I kid you not, I go to first-party studios, I go to third-party studios, and they have dev kits stacked. But they basically built blocks, or used Legos, as a gap so they could vent. Well now you can stack these 10 high.”

In closing with Gamasutra -- Gammill had this to say:

“I want the best version of the games people want to play to be running on our platforms,” said Gammill, by way of explaining why Scorpio exists. “We didn't have that until we came up with Scorpio. So Project Scorpio fills that gap.”

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Project Scorpio is set to release this holiday season, will you be picking one up? Let us know in the comments below and for everything Xbox related, stay tuned to GameSkinny.

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